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Open Pedagogy and Open Educational Practices [clear filter]
Wednesday, November 2
 

3:15pm

Running Errands for Ideas - How We Launched the Open Learning Lab at Lansing Community College
In mid-2015, "open" was not a word anyone would use to describe Lansing Community College and its pedagogical practices. The LMS, closed classrooms, and closed attitudes kept student learning locked up and hidden away. Assignments were disposable. Classes were closed and shut off from the world. But a little over a year later, LCC is now among the leaders in open learning. Today LCC has hosted an OER summit for the state of Michigan, launched a Domains of One's Own project, an Open Learning Lab, and the openlcc.net network. LCC is developing innovative approaches to integrating general education curriculum that faculty are enthusiastically embracing. And it didn't happen because of a grand vision by the college leadership. It happened because of the concerted grass-roots efforts of faculty and librarians, led by 4 accidental heroes.

This talk presents the tale of how we did it and what we learned along the way - all with the intent of helping (inspiring?) others to follow suit and light a revolution at their own schools. In this talk I will focus on the promotion of open learning practices, creation of our Open Learning Lab, and the innovations we are developing for our school's integrated general education initiative. We will tell the tales of our adventures, hoping to inspire and empower others to emerge as heroes.

Our accidental heroes include:

- Regina Gong, a librarian who drives our OER efforts (about which she will likely present in separate talk at OpenEd16)

- Our faculty Senate president, an historian without a lot of technology background but a great understanding of social revolutionary movements

- Leslie Johnson, (@mtflamingo) who started as "only" a composition professor, but is really a pedagogical Lara Croft. Starting with her own explorations of the pedagogical uses of social media, she surmounted numerous obstacles to emerge as champion of open and connected learning. Today she leads our Center for Teaching Excellence, our Integrated Gen Ed initiative, and has integrated a public-writing essay assignment into our core faculty development course.

- and myself, who at one-time appeared to be an ordinary economist that just got bored teaching his classes the same failed way every semester. I started with an anonymous blog to assist his classes in 2008. The resulting engagement and response from students led to converting the principles courses into a kind of open, mini-MOOC on WordPress (nobody knew about on campus, but there were rumors). That led to student blogs, student public writing assignments, and "secret" efforts to help other faculty (like Leslie) to begin experimenting ....

...and when the four of us came together, we spotted an opportunity to light the fire of an open learning revolution that has now taken hold.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Luke

Jim Luke

Professor, Lansing Community College
Currently Professor of Economics and founder of Open Learning Lab at LCC. 19 yrs teaching + 22 yrs in corporate planning & consulting. Inventor & innovator. Spent my whole life helping orgs change, invent, innovate, adapt to tech, and generally succeed. Switched to higher ed 15... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B16

3:40pm

Open Practice as a Tool for Educational Change
Often institutions focus on textbook cost and saving money for students as a reason to invest in open education. Opportunity and access are important missions, and OER help us to meet those missions by focusing on the value of saving students money. This very necessary part of OER initiatives causes many of us to focus on the adoption of OER- because the more adoptions we can pursue the greater cost savings to students. However, OER is about more than saving students money. Open education initiatives should also focus on intrinsic motivations toward education such as interest in classes and high-value learning experiences. Open practices are the key toward moving the institutional conversation beyond savings and adoptions to scaled and sustainable growth of pedagogies that value openness above the access to education. After all, access isn't the true goal of educational institutions; our goal is to graduates who think critically and engage responsibly with our communities and world. Open education should be bigger than saving students money so that they can afford to take more classes. Open education initiatives, at their best, should focus on the rights of open access, open licensing, and open practices to encourage the best learning experiences for a variety of students.

At Pierce College our efforts focus heavily on adoptions, but greater emphasis is being made on open practices that encourage leadership, faculty, and students to focus on the power of openness as a way of practicing education. This presentation will discuss the philosophy of open practices and how to grow them into the opportunity to improve institutional goals through focusing on the core principles of openness and institutional interest in improved student achievement.

Speakers
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B16
 
Thursday, November 3
 

9:00am

Criss Cross: One hand washes the other
The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) recently developed a new Framework for Information Literacy in response to the changing information environment and how people operate within it. The Framework opens up opportunities for connections, collaboration and conversations about learning.

At the same time, open pedagogy and open educational practices seek to step beyond OER as free textbooks to a transformative model of learning and teaching. Within Ehlers' framework for OEP and Hegarty's attributes of open pedagogy, there are multiple openings for connections to information literacy concepts.

This presentation will explore the web of connections among the frameworks, concepts and attributes, in order to promote a synergy between the advocates for information literacy and open education.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Bond

Paul Bond

Library Instruction Coordinator, University of Pittsburgh-Johnstown
I'm into lifelong learning, open education, information literacy, and playing around on the internet. That why I became a librarian.



Thursday November 3, 2016 9:00am - 9:25am
B16

9:25am

Building an OER-EAP Corpus
A language corpus is a collection of language texts, which can be both written and transcribed spoken, that is usually stored as a text file on a computer or a web server. The plural form of corpus is corpora. Often a concordancing program is used to search the corpus for language use patterns which can be helpful in language teaching and learning. The theoretical underpinnings of using corpora in the classroom can be attributed to the early work of Hymes (1966) and later Canale and Swain (1980) and Canale (1983) in their Communicative Competence models and usage-based approaches to second language learning and pedagogy (see Tyler, 2010). These approaches are based on the idea that the primary purpose for learning language is communication and using real target language in the classroom should be central to classroom language instruction. Coupled with this approach is the multidimensional nature of real language use and the various ways in which language forms connect to language meanings. Corpus-based pedagogy helps the learners understand and work through sometimes subtle meaning differences in language structure. This presentation focuses on the development of an OER corpus which can be used in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) classrooms for teaching and materials development. The OER-EAP corpus was created by the presenter using OpenStax academic texts and is freely available for EAP teachers and linguistic researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Brent Green

Brent Green

Associate Dean, SLCC SAT, ESL, CAR & Testing


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:25am - 9:50am
B16

9:50am

It's Not About the Books: Let's talk about Open Pedagogy
We talk a lot about the money saved, but the money saved isn't the true value of open education. Students are more engaged when they get to contribute to course and assessment design. Come hear about a smorgasbord of student led projects that live beyond the quarter and give value to the world. Learn about a repository tool that will help us collaborate on open pedagogy project ideas and share open educational resources created by students.

Speakers
avatar for Christie Fierro

Christie Fierro

Instructional Designer & OER Coordinator, Tacoma Community College


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:50am - 10:15am
B16

11:35am

Video-based Copyleft OERs for Teachers: Lessons Learned
Abstract:
Experiences & realizations from designing, producing, & sharing CC-BY-SA video-based, interactive online short courses for K-12 teachers.

More information:
Earlier this year, we developed and shared customizable, modularized, online "short courses" that are designed to help elementary and secondary teachers learn to plan curriculum-based lessons, projects, and units that incorporate educational technologies in effective ways. (See: http://activitytypes.wm.edu/shortcourse/.) As we designed and developed these courses, we planned to offer the materials to the larger teacher education community as OERs. In so doing, we worked to anticipate the needs of a wide range of teachers with varied experience, working in differing contexts and cultures, as much as possible. Framing our work in this expansive way brought much unanticipated learning, which we hope to share with interested OpenEd16 participants.

The content of the courses is divided into brief, sequential modules that help teachers to build their professional knowledge while learning to design technologically enriched instruction. Each module begins with an overview and learning goal for the segment, and is presented as video-based content that includes narrated slides, interviews with practicing teachers, imagery, and additional online resources. Each of the videos ranges from 2-13 minutes in length, and includes verbatim closed captioning. In addition to the video segments, the modules also offer editable student learning guides that scaffold each step of the learning, and regular prompts for realtime or asynchronous discussion with colleagues and mentors. The modules can be used as supplements to face-to-face courses or as a completely online learning experience that would span approximately 2-3 weeks. We have created different versions of the short course for elementary and secondary preservice and inservice teachers so that we could customize the examples included to maximize relevance for the learners.

We consciously created the materials to be perhaps too prescriptive and detailed for more experienced and/or advanced learners, since we suspected that it would be easier for users to remove some of the material than to have to create additional supports. We acknowledge, however, that despite our efforts to create content and structure in the short courses that could be used productively in many different teacher learning programs, providing options for other teacher educators to freely customize, amend, and remix the modules and supporting materials offers the most flexibility for using these materials. Therefore, we offer the course materials in three forms, providing instructors with maximal options for addressing their students' professional learning needs.

1. The courses can be used "as-is" through open Web sites.

2. Users can also download a learning management package file to import into a number of different learning management systems, such as Blackboard and Canvas. Once imported, users can modify the content, prompts and materials.

3. For those who would prefer more customization options, we also offer all of the course components for download, including video files, PowerPoint slides, and Microsoft Word document versions of the scripts and student materials. These can be modified, remixed, and used in any digital learning format.

We hope that our efforts will catalyze more widespread sharing and adaptation of professional learning OERs among teacher educators.

Speakers
avatar for Judi Harris

Judi Harris

Professor and Pavey Family Chair in Educational Technology, College of William & Mary
I work as a professor, coordinating the doctoral program in Curriculum and Educational Technology (CET), in the School of Education at the College of William & Mary in Virginia. My research and development focus upon technology integration in K-12 curricula, and the TPACK (technological... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B16

1:40pm

Free + Freedom: The Role of Open Pedagogy in the Open Education Movement
What if faculty co-constructed their course syllabi with their students, allowing them more control over learning outcomes, policies, required readings, assignments, and even grading? What if students were encouraged to engage in public scholarship and tasked with producing or refining open resources for the commons? And what if universities collaboratively developed their courses with radical transparency? Would rethinking education in this fashion prompt students, faculty, and administrators to recoil in fear or give in to territoriality? Or are there ways that open pedagogy can contribute to a new and relevant vision for education, one built on an ethos of sharing?

Post-secondary institutions frequently claim to be student-centered; however, they are often hard-pressed to offer any truly compelling ways in which their students (not faculty, course content, accreditation or testing requirements, or budgetary concerns) actually drive the learning process. Open education advocates routinely describe OER as "beyond free"; however, faculty who reuse, redistribute, and retain OER (themselves a minority) vastly outnumber those who revise and remix OER (let alone those few who involve their students in the process). Taken together this begs the question of whether "student-centered" and "permissions" are just soothing ideas or marketing ploys that are rarely implemented? In other words, are we are merely paying lip service to the pedagogical potential of open?

At OpenEd15, spirited conversations began about the role of open pedagogy in the OER community and the question of whether "free" is truly a gateway to "freedom." This presentation considers how "open" can manifest a learner-driven educational philosophy and how its practice can enhance our classrooms, our courses, and even our advocacy. We will offer a broad definition of "open pedagogy," explore it in practice (including providing specific examples from a range of academic fields and levels), and then raise questions about the potential benefits and pitfalls of widening the focus of open education advocacy and scholarship from open textbooks and cost-savings to include pedagogy and the value of the open license. Embedded in this presentation is our belief that the power of "open" is being underutilized, and that we as advocates should be thinking more broadly about access and more ambitiously about how the big tent of "open" can contribute to a critically needed, sustainable, and aspirational vision for education by and for the public.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Robin DeRosa

Dr. Robin DeRosa

Director of the Open Learning & Teaching Collaborative, Plymouth State University
Robin DeRosa is the Director of the Open Learning & Teaching Collaborative at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. The Open CoLab is a dynamic hub for praxis around pedagogical innovation, open education, and integrated approaches to teaching and learning. An advocate for public... Read More →
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, BCcampus
I am the University Teaching Fellow in Open Studies and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as the Senior Open Education Advocacy & Research... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B16

2:15pm

Making Open Special
Mountain Heights Academy, formerly Open High School of Utah, has learned a lot over the past 8 years in operation. Through failures and successes our faculty have elevated their open pedagogy and practice to best serve the needs of their students. Special education students benefit greatly from openness. General ed teachers can adapt and tier open content to meet student needs. Special ed teachers have access to a wealth of open educational resources to remix to customize lessons for their students. Open pedagogy + open practice + special ed students = winning. The best practices discovered for SpED also make the general ed courses better as well.

Speakers
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula. I'm passionate about digital learning, OER, students as instructional designers, and secondary ed. David Wiley g... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B16

2:40pm

Open Practice as a Tool for Educational Change
Often institutions focus on textbook cost and saving money for students as a reason to invest in open education. Opportunity and access are important missions, and OER help us to meet those missions by focusing on the value of saving students money. This very necessary part of OER initiatives causes many of us to focus on the adoption of OER- because the more adoptions we can pursue the greater cost savings to students. However, OER is about more than saving students money. Open education initiatives should also focus on intrinsic motivations toward education such as interest in classes and high-value learning experiences. Open practices are the key toward moving the institutional conversation beyond savings and adoptions to scaled and sustainable growth of pedagogies that value openness above the access to education. After all, access isn't the true goal of educational institutions; our goal is to graduates who think critically and engage responsibly with our communities and world. Open education should be bigger than saving students money so that they can afford to take more classes. Open education initiatives, at their best, should focus on the rights of open access, open licensing, and open practices to encourage the best learning experiences for a variety of students.

At Pierce College our efforts focus heavily on adoptions, but greater emphasis is being made on open practices that encourage leadership, faculty, and students to focus on the power of openness as a way of practicing education. This presentation will discuss the philosophy of open practices and how to grow them into the opportunity to improve institutional goals through focusing on the core principles of openness and institutional interest in improved student achievement.

Speakers
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B16
 
Friday, November 4
 

11:30am

Slaying GOBLINs: Gamification as Open Educational Practice
How do we slay the GOBLINs of traditional instruction and use open educational resources (OER) to instill new pedagogies? As we move beyond content delivery as the paradigm for education and the textbook as the posterchild for OER, can we reintroduce play and with it the motivations accompanying agency and personal growth into professional development and the classroom?

Games Offer Bold Learning Insights Nowadays (http://goblin.keeganslw.net) or GOBLIN is an open, interactive adventure game built as a vehicle to experientially teach and learn. GOBLIN combines professional development, storytelling, and a role-playing game into a faculty development opportunity for instructors at the University of Oklahoma.



Traditional approaches to gamification in education have relied on badges and extrinsic motivations. Instead, GOBLIN baked elements of gamification-including agency, personalized feedback, and collaboration-into the gameplay to engage participants in metacognitive reflection.



Taking a commercial approach to building a game or gamifying an entire class can be expensive and time consuming. GOBLIN consists of an in-person workshop, a table-top role playing game, a website, and a participant-curated collection of resources. By repurposing the public domain assets of an open source video game (https://www.glitchthegame.com/) and using open source tools, we developed the multi-modal components of GOBLIN in a free and replicable model. However, this was not without its challenges. For instance, the limited nature of open artwork meant that it was hard to present diversity (both in terms of gender and race) within our fantasy world.



The gamified GOBLIN workshops offered an experiential faculty development opportunity demonstrating the utility of play as motivation. Being in the GOBLIN game, allowed us as instructors to approach games in education from a critical perspective. Interaction within the workshop and our post-course study reflect strong faculty engagement. Twenty-one participants produced more than two hundred reflections, blog posts, and curated resources-all of which were optional assignments-and they have integrated gamification and open resources into their own courses (see http://goblin.keeganslw.net/participant-responses/).



In this presentation, we will present the gameplay and faculty experience of GOBLIN. Like GOBLIN, our presentation will use gamification to open a dialogue on the role of gamification and open pedagogy in professional development, instructional design, and the classroom. And of course, we need your help to defeat the GOBLIN!

Speakers
avatar for Keegan Long Wheeler

Keegan Long Wheeler

Educator | Open Practitioner | Web Creator | Design Dabbler | Instructional Hacker/Remixer | Game Maker | Ed Technologist/Problem solver of last resort @TeachOU Let's make learning more fun, together! My favorite project at the moment is eXperience Play (https://experienceplay.education... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B16

1:15pm

The Open SUNY COTE Quality Review (OSCQR) Process and Rubric for the review and improvement of online courses.
The Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence (COTE) has developed an online course design rubric and process that addresses both the instructional design and accessibility of an online course that is openly licensed for anyone to use and adapt. The aim of the Open SUNY COTE Quality Review (OSCQR) Rubric and Process is to assist online instructional designers and online faculty improve the quality and accessibility of their online courses, while also providing a system-wide approach to collect data that informs faculty development, and supports large scale online course design review and refresh efforts systematically and consistently. The OSCQR rubric and process are currently being used by 38 SUNY institutions.



There are two components OSCQR:

1. The OSCQR Process provides a Framework and Dashboard that support a campus-tailored and scalable approach to improving the instructional design of online or blended courses.

2. The OSCQR Rubric has 37 online course design standards and 37 accessibility standards. The Rubric is flexible and designed to be used in a variety of course quality assurance approaches.



We are in the process of improving OSCQR and will launch a new version of the rubric that will have integrated accessibility standards and will include course-level standards for incorporating OER into online instruction and be more extensible for standards dealing with other topics.

The rubric can be used formatively with new online faculty to help guide, inform and influence the design of their new online courses. It is non-evaluative: Conceptually the rubric and process approach course review and refresh as a professional development exercise, to guide faculty in their understanding of improving course design from an effective practices perspective, rather than as a course evaluation, or quality assurance procedure. It prioritizes changes. An Action Plan is automatically generated by the course review process that presents recommendations for course design improvements based on the review, and assists in prioritization of course revisions based on the estimated time to make those improvements. The rubric also provides suggestions for course design improvements for each standard that can be selected from a menu of options by each reviewer to supplement reviewer feedback. The rubric can be customized. Standards can be added, edited, and /or eliminated. There is no license fee for use of the rubric. It is shared with a creative Creative Commons license: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US. Because the OSCQR Rubric is licensed under Creative Commons, and the Dashboard is licensed under LGPL, the entire process can be shared, used by anyone with no cost, and can be customized to address individual campus environments.

If you attend this session you will:

1. Become an Open SUNY Fellow in the "Friend of SUNY" role so we can continue the conversation started in the session.

2. Earn a badge for participation by giving us feedback on the planned improvements to the rubric.

3. Take home the OSCQR Rubric



OSCQR Links:



The Rubric:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ICwNCdRQTw7thRKCMLonrVaoyIin584gjUcu96YGzS8/edit?usp=sharing



OSCQR rubric annotations:

https://1e91997432919e6f3d6f400e666382bb0475f7f7-www.googledrive.com/host/0BzXVZ_L-QpX8ZUtERjhBU2UyZUU#1a



Adopting the OSCQR rubric:

http://commons.suny.edu/cote/course-supports/oscqr-rubric/if-you-want-to-use-the-oscqr-analytics-on-your-campus/



A video overview of the rubric and dashboard:

https://youtu.be/XfoHwjb_AEA

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra  M. Pickett

Alexandra M. Pickett

Director, Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence
I lead the Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence. Talk to me about online teaching and learning. Online faculty development. Online instructional design. Large-scale online faculty development. Building online communities of practice. Online course quality, standards, and... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B16

1:40pm

Playing with Jello: Faculty experiences adopting openness as a core value
This presentation reports on the experiences of three faculty members designing and developing a Master's degree in Learning and Technology when they adopted openness as a core value and key design principle.



A growing body of evidence suggests that adoption of open educational resources (OER), and especially open textbooks, leads to lower costs for students without having negative impacts on academic outcomes (e.g., Hilton, in press; Wiley, Williams, DeMarte, & Hilton, 2016). While the benefits of open textbooks and OER are compelling, little is known about programs that are designed with openness as a core value. What does it mean to embrace open practices and embody an open philosophy at the program and course level within a Master's program? What are faculty experiences with such an approach? How can the student experience be optimized? In what ways does openness support a diverse student body? What tensions arise and what supports are required to facilitate the transition to an MA degree that not only uses open textbooks but is defined by openness?



The MA program that we will present represents a case study for the open community. In this degree, students contribute meaningfully to digital learning networks and communities in the field. The degree prepares students to work in the creation and evaluation of digital learning environments and apply theoretical and practical knowledge to critically analyze learning innovations and assess their impact on organizations and society. Openness is central to the achievement of this program goal. Openness was adopted as a program value predicated on the philosophical stance that open practices lead to collaboration and the development of a digital mindset that values sharing and cultivates networked learning.



In this case study of an MA program, open practices are evidenced at the course level in the design of the online experience; through the use of "renewable assignments"; authentic assessment opportunities, in resource curation and, through online facilitation approaches. At the program level, it manifests itself in the intentional open spaces that have been designed into the program which require student identification and completion of personalized areas of inquiry. It is also evidenced through the adoption of open pedagogy as a design principle that informs design and delivery decisions at the course and program level.



Initial tensions such as coming to a common understanding of openness and what openness can be within the constraints of an institution; how openness supports or detracts from online community; the role of openness in the creation of safe learning environments and, ways to support adjunct faculty for designing for openness will be highlighted in this presentation. This MA program is currently under development so by November additional strategies that have been used to develop a common understanding around openness and open pedagogy at the faculty and institutional level will also be discussed. In addition, various supports that have been used in working with adjunct faculty in course design with openness as a core value will be shared.



References



Hilton III, J. (in press).

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Associate Professor & Program Head, Royal Roads University
At RRU we are designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.


Friday November 4, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B16

2:15pm

Transforming and opening education with practical pedagogy and publishing strategies
The value of academic libraries is established by demonstrating support for student and faculty success, however, our role and value is expanding as a result of the demands to transform the academy; making college education more affordable, increasingly accountable for performance, increasing student access, while controlling costs. These extraordinary challenges for colleges and universities are opportunities for libraries to provide key leadership and support strategies that open doors for transformation and sustainable practices that enhance teaching, learning, research and scholarship.



This talk focuses on a set of high-impact strategies that support student and faculty success by developing open access digital scholarship, publishing open textbooks, and providing student scholar internships. The presentation will provide useful ideas that draw from experiences with Open SUNY Textbooks, Digital Thoreau, Humboldt State University Press, and the HSU Library Scholar Internship program. Attendees will understand practical library tactics that can become crucial assets to campuses, and emerge as key strategies for transforming higher education.


Speakers
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

Library Dean, Humboldt State University
Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/


Friday November 4, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B16

2:40pm

Open Pedagogies: Levels of Learning, Support, and Community
During the Spring 2016 Semester, three instructors at UMW collaborated on an open pedagogy experiment, all teaching a section of "DGST 101: Introduction to Digital Studies." With over 100 students over four sections, we wanted students in each of our sections to benefit from participating in that larger peer community and share their experiences and work with an authentic and supportive audience. To accomplish this, our students blogged on websites created through the Domain of One's Own Project, used resources and assignment modules on a central website (DGST101.net), and shared their work through discussions in the messaging and productive app, Slack. The faculty also used the Canvas LMS for logistics and communication specific to each of our sections. We also incorporated the web tool Hypothes.is to allow students to annotate spaces online, and to promote discussions around data and online presence. Each of these tools and platforms provided opportunities for students to share and interact with each other and the instructors in different ways with varying levels of openness and privacy that students were given agency to engage with at their discretion. The purpose of our presentation is to explore how these different technologies promoted openness and at the same time supported student's agency to decide how open they choose to be, while protecting their privacy and promoting safe spaces to experiment. Finally, this presentation will discuss the underlying pedagogical philosophies that informed our decisions and what we learned from the experience.


Speakers
avatar for Lee Skallerup Bessette

Lee Skallerup Bessette

Instructional Technology Specialist, University of Mary Washington


Friday November 4, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B16