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Wednesday, November 2
 

8:30am

Keynote: Gardner Campbell
Wednesday November 2, 2016 8:30am - 9:15am
Grand Ballroom

9:15am

Open Pedagogy Showcase
Wednesday November 2, 2016 9:15am - 10:00am
Grand Ballroom

10:00am

Break
Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
TBA

10:30am

Personalized Professional Learning Pathways for OER implementation
The goal is changing. The approach is changing. The infrastructure is changing. Our materials are not keeping pace. Why should our children learn in an entirely different environment when preparing for the professional world? Openly licensed educational resources have become more prevalent in school districts in the past year. With support from the US Department of Education, state leaders, and new platforms for curation and discovery, there has never been a more exciting time to begin innovating classroom instruction. Participants will learn how to begin making the transition to openly licesned educational resources in your school district and hear about examples across the country where this transition is taking place. 



Speakers
avatar for Kristina Peters

Kristina Peters

K-12 Open Education Fellow, U.S. Department of Education
Talk to me about transitioning to the use of openly licensed educational resources in place of traditional instructional materials. #GoOpen
JS

Joseph South

Director of Office of Educational Technology, U.S. Department of Education


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B17

10:30am

The SUNY Open Education Research Lab
The Open Education Research Lab's learning scientists use a methodology that blends theory and practice of learning - Design Based Research (DBR). As a methodology, DBR enables inquiry into complex problems facing educators and learners. DBR mandates study in-vivo using an iterative and responsive process in order to understand how a theory of learning operates in a real-world setting. A researcher using DBR works to understand and inform practice at both a micro, local level while also improving the macro, understanding within the Learning Sciences. A result of a study that utilizes DBR could be the refinement of an educational theory or the development of a new theory. The presentation will focus on the creation of the SUNY OE Research Lab at the University at Buffalo and discuss the results from an Innovative Instruction Technology Grant (IITG) where students and faculty were surveyed on their perceived benefits of OER.

Speakers
MM

Mark McBride

SUNY, Monroe Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B11

10:30am

What 'Open' Means to the Saylor Academy Learner
Since 2008 Saylor Academy has been building open online courses. Internally, we know and agree upon what open means to us as an organization. From our own perception, Saylor courses are "open" in that they are available to learners for free 24/7, and just as importantly, because they are built using openly licensed materials and are released under a CC-BY license themselves.



However, our meaning of open is not necessarily the same as that of our users, and looking deeper into that potential difference may be telling in the understanding of what attracts individuals to freely available materials on the web, and useful in developing and spreading initiatives that have an aim to make access to education more equitable through the use of open materials.



During this presentation, Saylor staff will share the results and analysis of on ongoing survey of our student and user population that aims to get at the question of "What does open mean to you?"


Speakers
avatar for Sean Connor

Sean Connor

Director of Community Relations, Saylor Academy
Open online courses; LMS; marketing; business & institutional use cases for OER; community management; libraries; edtech; equity; college affordability; alternative credit options; alternative credentials.
avatar for Devon Ritter

Devon Ritter

Director of Education, Saylor Academy



Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B12

10:30am

Secrets to Success as a Faculty OER Champion
The most successful OER initiatives are those that are faculty driven and administratively supported. Key to this success are faculty champions who either by design or desire take on the role of OER advocate. In this presentation, Linda Williams, Faculty Team Lead and Champion for Tidewater Community College's Z Degree shares lessons learned, including keys to success and challenges faced by faculty champions. Among topics covered are building consensus, garnering support and overcoming objections to OER adoption.

Speakers
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B13

10:30am

The Personal API Path: Steps Towards Nirvana
Kin Lane, API Evangelist, has long been a traveler on the API path. Tom Woodward has newly come to it. Kin will explain API Nirvana, that it's more a journey than a destination, and Tom will explain the path and patterns of his early progress towards that destination. The use of APIs will range from the practical to the whimsical. The API path is, after all, what you make of it.

While each person must walk their own API path, there is a direction to follow. All seekers must extinguish the fires of-

-Ignorance - not knowing where your content is or how it is governed

-Short-sightedness - not realizing how temporary so many things are

-Compartmentalization - not taking advantage of the connecteness of all things

Note: This is a #reclaim sect and will weave in elements of reclaiming your own work as well as ways to make that practical through APIs. It will also branch into the exploration of API whimsy- where you do things simply because they amuse you. References will include external tools that make it possible to use APIs for those who don't code while also providing code and other considerations for those who do.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B14

10:30am

The Village People: Creating Infrastructure for OER Degree
In order to develop an infrastructure to support OER degrees at a large multi-college system, a number of roles have been identified to support the identification and provision of OER courses towards degrees. The roles include a mix of District-level personnel, college administrators, management, faculty, librarians, instructional designers, student services personnel and more.

This panel discussion will provide an opportunity for participants to learn about the roles, responsibilities, successes and lessons learned and how these roles have affected scaling of OER.

The panel will include several people in these roles who will also be able to share their reasons for joining the project and their experiences:

Alisa Cooper, Co-chair Maricopa Millions Project and English Faculty Glendale Community College
Tracey Haynie, Math Faculty, Scottsdale Community College
Hazel Davis, Library Faculty, Rio Salado College
George Gregg, Chemistry Faculty, Glendale Community Collee
Lisa Worthy, Psychology Faculty, Glendale Community College

Additionally, the members of the audience will be asked to share their models and roles for scaling their OER projects.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Young

Lisa Young

Faculty Director, Center for Teaching and Learning, Scottsdale Community College
I serve Scottsdale Community College as the Instructional Design and Educational Technology faculty member. | | I am passionate about helping our students learn whether it be through excellent instructional design, the use of educational technology to resolve and mitigate instructional needs, and/or providing open educational resources to eliminate barriers to access and provide more relevant and useful learning materials


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 11:20am
B16

10:30am

Promoting Government use of OER: the Federal Open Licensing Playbook
Over the course of 2016, the U.S. Department of Education, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and the U.S. Department of State are working with federal program officers, policymakers, and civil society representatives to build an Open Licensing Playbook. The Playbook will provide information on how agencies can effectively use open licensing requirements and draw upon existing OER to advance their public missions and better serve citizens. The Playbook aims to answer common questions on the institutional use of OER and on open licensing requirements for grants, such as (a) how and where to best retain resources once produced, (b) how to encourage grantees to use existing openly-licensed materials, and (c) how to provide support to grantees who are developing openly-licensed materials for the first time, among other issues. In addition to providing recommended approaches, the playbook will also highlight case studies from across the federal government. The draft Playbook will be released in the third quarter of 2016. The final product will carry an open license and may be applicable for other governments and institutions.



This presentation will introduce the content of the Playbook and cover some of the lessons learned from its development.


Speakers
PK

Paul Kruchoski

U.S. Department of State
JW

Jennryn Wetzler

Department of State


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:30am - 11:20am
Grand Ballroom

10:55am

Anatomy of a System-Wide Open Education Initiative
Many community colleges, universities, and even entire state systems have launched open educational resources (OER) initiatives. For most, the focus has been on saving students money by replacing expensive textbooks with openly licensed, "free" textbooks. Students have indeed saved millions of dollars already. Motivated by these first movers, the University System of New Hampshire (USNH) has launched a similar initiative, but rather than focusing on textbooks alone, the system has decided to support an Open Education initiative that includes OER, open pedagogy and open access. USNH enrolls 34,000 students, and consists of four public institutions: Granite State College, Keene State College, Plymouth State University, and the University of New Hampshire. To our knowledge, we are the first 4-year state university system in the country to implement an Open Education initiative. We believe that embracing and supporting all three components of open education provides a platform for transforming our educational experiences into truly student-centered learning opportunities. This presentation will explain how we built support for this initiative, and share results from the first phase of implementation.

The initiative will kick off at the sixth annual USNH Academic Technology Institute (ATI) in June 2016. Historically, the four-day conference focused on faculty professional development around specific academic technologies (hardware, software, etc.) and how they could be used by the 40 faculty ambassadors attending each institute. Over the last three years, we have shifted focus from the technology to the pedagogy. In 2014, Cable Green gave an invited keynote about Creative Commons licensing, the broken publishing model, and working and sharing openly. For most faculty and support staff there, this was an exciting and new way to think not only about content, but about teaching and learning as a whole. Enough energy and interest came out of ATI 2014 that we decided on an "Open Education" theme for ATI 2015; this again generated a considerable amount of excitement and awareness around Open Education, which led to the development of an OER pilot project with nine University of New Hampshire faculty. The pilot project saved students over $148,000 in the fall 2015 term alone. Using that and other supporting data from the pilot, we created a formal proposal to expand support for open education capacity across all four campuses in the upcoming year-long initiative. Funds were also requested for technical support, library resources, website development and maintenance, marketing, project management, administrative assistance, and program assessment. The system approved the proposed budget for $385,000 which is $285,000 above what had been budgeted for previous ATIs. The majority of the fifty faculty ambassadors participating in this initiative have chosen OER for their projects but there will also be a contingent of faculty working in the open pedagogy and open access areas. At OpenEd16, we will share faculty projects and success stories, but our primary focus will be on presenting the process by which we developed and implemented this system-wide initiative and on sharing preliminary results.

Speakers
avatar for Robin DeRosa

Robin DeRosa

Program Director, Interdisciplinary Studies, Plymouth State University
Interested in Open Pedagogy, interdisciplinarity, and learner-centered futures for public higher education. Find me on Twitter @actualham.
avatar for Scott Robison

Scott Robison

Director, Learning Technologies and Online Educati, Plymouth State University
Open pedagogy, open education resources, personal learning networks, informal learning, botany


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B17

10:55am

Collaborations and divisions: Sharing, strategizing, and supporting nascent institution-wide OER initiatives in higher education
Since the 12th Annual Open Education Conference, staff members at Boise State and Clemson University have sought to establish institution-wide initiatives around open educational resources (OER). Despite holding a shared identity as public universities, these two institutions-one located in the Northwestern and one in the Southeastern United States-harbor distinct cultures, climates, and agendas as they relate to the sustainable implementation and support of OER initiatives. Simply stated, common solutions for spreading awareness and adoption of OER at Boise State and Clemson seemed unlikely.

Yet, over the last year, administrators, librarians, researchers, and technologists of both universities have consulted each other, surveyed additional institutions, interviewed outside representatives, analyzed strategic materials, vetted technology partnerships, developed pilot programs, built digital infrastructure, and recruited campus populations, under the notion that open education is appropriate for and important to the missions of their respective institutions. And while administrative programs have now been established at the institutional level, certain variables remain that help and hinder proliferation of OER at each university.

If minimal institutional support, a lack of technological tools for sharing and adapting resources, inconsistent skills and time for users, varying quality or appropriateness of resources, and issues of trust between faculty and administrators can be considered common threats to the creation of long-lasting OER programs in higher ed., the members of this panel (having faced these stakes firsthand) claim that the best approach toward tackling such problems is an open one that spans disciplines, departments, and institutions.

In pursuit of sharing novel experiences and identifying common ground, panel members will discuss their recent research and experiences in founding, supporting, and sustaining OER initiatives at universities in the U.S.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Lashley

Jonathan Lashley

Director of Texts and Technologies, Clemson University


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B18

10:55am

Student Survival: Improving Course Throughput in TCC's Z Degree
Data from Tidewater Community College's Z Degree will be presented in support of the hypothesis that the most powerful educational interventions may be those that lead to increases in the overall course survival rate, which could in turn lead to higher graduation rates. In this session, the presenters will share results from a current study that appears to demonstrate that OER adoption by faculty is associated with improvements in course survival rates.

Speakers
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd
avatar for Linda  S. Williams

Linda S. Williams

Professor, Tidewater Community College
Business Professor Linda Williams has become the face of TCC’s Textbook Free Degree. She’s been featured in countless articles and television interviews about the cutting edge program that enables TCC business students to earn an entire degree while spending zero funds for textbooks. | | “It is amazing to be the first accredited institution of higher learning to offer a fully OER-based degree,” said Williams. “While we see the... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B11

10:55am

Library Usage as a Map for Targeting OER Advocacy and Growth
Library collections contain significant analytics about the demand for and usage of course content that we are mining to guide advocacy and outreach for open educational resources. The NCSU Libraries has analyzed portfolios of request and usage data for this purpose. Data points such as general collection circulation, reserve use, and interlibrary loan requests all provide indicators of faculty textbook assignments and purchase alternative demand among students. Library request and usage data provide indicator signals of course content students are seeking to access through alternatives to standard purchase options. Librarians at NCSU compile usage data for required textbooks, compare it to course enrollment data, and identify courses and instructors for targeted alternative textbook outreach. Factors such as the demographics of enrolled students, course level, availability of content through the Libraries, and affordability of required content can influence the level of demand through the library. This presentation will outline the analytical techniques used to guide advocacy efforts and discuss the efficacy of that outreach in promoting alternatives to traditional textbooks.

Speakers
avatar for Greg Raschke

Greg Raschke

Associate Director for Collections and Scholarly C, NC State University Libraries


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B12

10:55am

Faculty Experiences, Reflections and Perceptions of Open Textbooks
The rationale for adoption of open textbooks for students is easy, but for faculty the decision to adopt open textbooks may occur for multifaceted reasons. A selection of a random subset (n=25) of faculty members in British Columbia will mine the experiences of educators through the lens of activity theory. In particular the questions will seek to uncover:

- Motivations for adopting open education

- Nature of adoption/adaption

- Experiences with adopting/adapting

- Perceptions of open textbook

- Perceived impact on the adoption of open textbooks on their students

- Reflections on changes to teaching philosophy or pedagogy

- Evaluation of the open textbook adopted (based on a rubric)

Additional themes the researchers seek to uncover will include faculty member's exposure to targeted OER training programs or open textbooks advocates, how storage and search functionality advances open textbook adoption, and what community of learning supports exist for instructors wanting to implement open textbooks and share their experiences.

By investigating faculties adoption of open textbooks through the lens of activity theory, we are exploring open textbook adoption through the analytical components of subject, tool and object where the subject is the faculty--including consideration of their personality and teaching philosophy, the object is an open textbook, and the tool is the mechanism by which the adoption took place.

In addition, the lens of activity theory will illuminate the historical context and current environment in which faculty implement open textbooks. A holistic approach to exploring researcher's experience includes consideration of the community the faculty member finds herself in, the rules of OER, and the way that the relationships of faculty to open textbooks are mediated by the division of labour.

OER development and implementation practices have become well documented in open education. As the movement grows beyond grassroots activism to widespread adoption, a research gap still remains in exploring educator's experiences in adopting open textbooks.

As John Hilton (2016) has stated "OER has moved into theory from practice" and in Canada and the United States open textbooks are the most obvious point of entry into OER. Textbooks offer an easy alternative to full-scale course development when Universities are employing more adjuncts and instructors are finding themselves struggling to catch up with changing technologies.

Exploring the motivations and perceptions of faculty allows for the gradual development of "case studies' and a chance to study the emergence of best practices in open textbooks through every step of the development and implementation process. British Columbia is an ideal place to document the successes of open textbook adoption as they have seen great success in open textbook initiatives.

Speakers
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am the Open Studies Teaching Fellow and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. I have revised two open textbooks—for... Read More →
avatar for Danielle  Paradis

Danielle Paradis

Co-Researcher, Kwantlen Polytechnic University


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B13

10:55am

Choral Explanations: An Introduction
As Open Educational Resources move into the mainstream, producers of these works must decide whether they wish to replicate the standard textbook process and format or explore new options in presentation and production. In this presentation, we present an alternative to traditional textbook production we have named "choral explanations". This model allows for broad student and faculty-based production while providing a better experience for the reader as well.

Speakers
MC

Michael Caulfield

Washington State University


Wednesday November 2, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B14

11:30am

Netease Online Open Courses - Connecting China, Connecting the World
Netease Online Open Courses is the largest provider of OER in China. By revising content and creating its own Netease Online Open Courses hopes to leverage OER to connect China to the world, and the world with China. In this presentation I will provide a brief background on how Netease Online Open Courses operates and what its core mission and values are. At its essence, Netease Online Open Courses is an educational platform where learners can access materials in Chinese. We have revised OER such as Khan Academy and also provide access to OER from local Chinese universities. In addition, we have created our own open content and apps. We hope through this presentation that we can help connect China to the world, and the world with China.

Speakers

Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B17

11:30am

Fundraising for 'Free' - one pathway of sustainability
One of the challenges for OERs is sustainability, especially in light of offering many open educational resources at no cost. This session focuses on MIT OpenCourseWare's annual fund efforts. We'll share lessons learned in running online fundraising campaigns and the stewardship activities that can inspire sustained giving for the long-term.

Speakers
avatar for Yvonne Ng

Yvonne Ng

External Outreach and Annual Giving Manager, MIT OpenCourseWare
Marketing, social media, fundraising, and stewardship.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B18

11:30am

Briefing: OER Policy in the United States
Public policy is an important component of the environment around OER. Policy can be leveraged to help advance the use and creation of OER by providing resources, creating programs, or giving direction to institutions and schools. It can also be used to remove barriers, such as older systems or practices that favor traditional publishing models. Policymakers themselves can also play a role as effective advocates and validators.



This session will provide a up-to-the minute briefing on the current U.S. policy environment around OER: what is happening in Congress, which states are most active, how the Presidential election will affect the space, and where OER policy connects with other open movements, such as open data, open government and open access to research. It will also include behind-the-scenes analysis of policy opportunities coming up in the next year, and how members of the audience can become involved.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e



Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B16

11:30am

The Impact of OER at Salt Lake Community College
At SLCC we have one of the larger OER initiatives nationally. In fall 2016, we will be running close to 500 OER-based sections. We have flipped entire courses open, including courses in Biology, Math, and History. We also have larger numbers of sections in Education, Sociology, History, and Business. Finally, we have emerging OER projects in Geology, Economics, and Psychology. While we haven't yet built an open degree, we have scaled OER laterally so that we're now poised to save a majority of SLCC students significant money with the initiative.

Now that we have achieved scale, we're turning our attention to researching the efficacy of the OER initiative. Our study utilizes a mixed methods approach, combining survey and institutional data, to evaluate student success outcomes. We are interested in understanding if easing the textbook cost burden leads to higher retention, persistence, transfer, and completion rates.

We have three waves of survey data on student attitudes toward textbooks--both traditional and OER. In addition, the scale of our OER initiative allows us to mine a rich institutional data source and draw firm conclusions about the effectiveness of open educational resources. Taken together, these qualitative and quantitative methodologies allow us to make an important contribution to the study of the impact of OER.

Speakers
avatar for Jessie Winitsky-Stephens

Jessie Winitsky-Stephens

Statistical Analyst, Salt Lake Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B11

11:30am

Using a 'Course Refresh' initiative to open the OER Door
The Herkimer College/SUNY Internet Academy staff have developed and initiated a course development - course refresh process to provide its online students the highest quality, most accessible and most personally relevant learning experience possible. Courses refreshed under this program provide online students with state of the art learning strategies which encourage deep learning, course completion, and success. Three highlights of the process are its emphasis on 1) selecting and/or creating Open Educational Resources to replace expensive proprietary course content, 2) incorporating personally relevant applied learning experiences into the courses, and 3) designing heutagogical components into each course to maximize student engagement and deep learning. While the initiative was implemented to elevate the quality of online courses, the impact on campus courses has also been dramatic.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Murray

Laura Murray

OER Coordinator, SUNY OER Services
I coordinate projects and support services for the fabulous team at Open SUNY Textbooks and SUNY OER Services.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B12

11:30am

Does Your Talk Match Your Walk? Setting the Example for OER Doubters.
Many faculty resist adopting OERs, questioning their quality; others say they are too busy to consider developing their own. However, when a college is fortunate to have faculty who have developed and/or adopted OERs, those faculty can recommend their use to others with an added air of credibility. The experienced faculty are in a position to offer expertise to others throughout the process of considering new OER development and adoption.

Mark Kelland is a psychology professor at Lansing Community College (LCC) who wrote a personality textbook for a major publisher. Eventually, however, he regained the ownership of his copyright and began giving the textbook to his students for free. Now that his book is available on OpenStax CNX, he is the first faculty member at LCC to make a full textbook available as an OER. Recently he began developing OERs for another course, and he led the way successfully encouraging his colleagues to adopt the OpenStax College textbook for introductory psychology. In this presentation, Mark will share his experiences writing traditional academic material as compared to OERs, and the advantages of choosing the OER option.

Kari Richards is the faculty chair for the foreign language program at LCC. She has actively adopted OERs for her own classes in German, and supported others in considering the adoption of OERs for courses in French and Spanish. With Kari's encouragement and support, our first OER foreign language course (Conversational German) launched fall 2015, and in spring 2016 there were two additional OER foreign language courses (Conversational French & Spanish). All three OER foreign language courses were created by adjunct faculty and have received positive feedback from the students. Along with Mark, Kari has been identified as one of the leading faculty advocates for OERs on LCC's campus (Mark as a full-time professor; Kari as an adjunct professor).

The latter point is an example of one of the most interesting experiences we have encountered: that many adjunct faculty are the ones eager to consider OERs. We have begun enlisting and encouraging our adjunct faculty in particular to help develop enough OER-based courses to support several z-degrees at LCC (zero-textbook-cost degrees in psychology and our two general transfer degrees). Both Mark and Kari are focused on encouraging campus-wide use of OERs at LCC, supporting the faculty who are willing to participate, and ultimately winning over everyone else. An important part of this presentation will be a discussion of what we envision as the future of OER development and adoption at LCC, and the initial positive experiences we have encountered while attempting to enlist others to join us.

Supported by an academic librarian who has become the OER Project Manager on campus, with Mark representing the full-time faculty and Kari representing the adjunct faculty, we have a motivated and active team supporting the development and adoption of OERs on our campus. We anticipate a groundswell of support across campus as we move forward in our own programs and the initial z-degrees.

Speakers
MK

Mark Kelland

Professor, Lansing Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B13

11:30am

OER in the LMS via LTI
Like them or hate them the LMS is where students are most likely to interact with content. Creating new tools that implement the LTI protocol can be expensive and time consuming. We'll demonstrate how to quickly, easily, and cheaply construct an LTI tool that can bring your OER content into the LMS.

Speakers
avatar for Justin Ball

Justin Ball

CTO, Atomic Jolt
I measure my chocolate consumption in pounds.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B14

12:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday November 2, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Grand Ballroom

1:15pm

The OERu 1st year of study: open, online and international
Here is a link to the presentation: http://slides.com/marcsinger1/deck

In this presentation, we will look at how the members of the OERu consortium, an international group of institutions of higher education, have worked to develop a first-year curriculum and credential consisting entirely of open courses. This credential is designed to be accepted internationally, by all member institutions and any others who want to make use of it. To achieve this goal, we have designed courses and assessments, created transfer and articulation guidelines, and relied upon expertise both of the partner institutions and volunteers committed to the mission of the OERu.

We will review the unique open model employed by the OERu, and also some of the challenges that the OERu partners have had to address along the way, including alignment of course content, requirements of national curricula, and development of satisfactory measures of successful course completion. We will also explore the impact of these efforts on the individual institutions themselves, and how their work in OER has led to a consideration of Open Educational Practices in their own course design, pedagogy, and the empowerment of their students.


Speakers
avatar for Marc Singer

Marc Singer

Vice Provost, Thomas Edison State University
Talk to me about anything. I will try to keep up. But job-related: prior learning assessment, adult learners, competency-based education.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B17

1:15pm

Collaborative OER Course Design and Development
Presenters will share a collaborative course development process used to create hybrid OER courses for a 2015 project funded by the Chancellor's Innovation Fund of the Virginia Community College System. They will discuss how to select OER materials that align with course objectives, the advantages and disadvantages of faculty collaboration, and the benefits of hybrid course design. This model can serve any discipline.

Speakers
avatar for Laura Young

Laura Young

Associate Professor of English, Northern Virginia Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B18

1:15pm

Inclusive design, addressing accessibility, and changing the way you think
The Floe Project funded by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has been producing resources to help OER hosts and creators make learning environments and content more inclusive. The goal of breaking down barriers to learning and reaching those slipping through the cracks is being accomplished through a suite of embeddable components (learner options, sonification, chart authoring, and more), and through a handbook of techniques for making content more inclusive. The components are easily integrated into applications, sites, and WordPress; while the handbook tackles gnarly problems with complex content like math, simulations, sonification, simplification and more.

By using an inclusive design approach to all activities (hackathons, workshops, meetings, design, and development), the Floe community has carved out a process for conducting inclusive design. This process helps build open communities of participants who can solve for accessibility, represent an inclusive perspective, and think deeply about problem solving. And by building out these communities, Floe has extended the impact that an inclusive process can have - well beyond checklists and one-off solutions. This process yields more inclusive solutions that empower content hosts and creators to break down barriers to learning while better meeting the needs of diverse learners through transformation, augmentation, and personalization of the learning experience.

This session will provide a practical, hands-on approach to inclusive design using the tools, handbook, and processes described above. Participants will learn how to use the Inclusive Design Cards to collaboratively learn and teach inclusive principles, practices, tools, and activities - and in doing so disrupt old ruts of thinking and problem solving. Come ready to embrace diversity, exercise your design thinking, and learn how to co-create.

Speakers
avatar for Jess Mitchell

Jess Mitchell

Senior Manager, Inclusive Design Research Centre, OCAD University
Jess Mitchell is Senior Manager, Research + Design at the Inclusive Design Research Centre (http://idrc.ocad.ca). She manages large-scale international projects and initiatives focusing on fostering innovation within diverse communities while achieving outcomes that benefit everyone. | Jess is a community leader who works in a highly collaborative, open, and iterative manner borrowing methods from complex project management, agile... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B12

1:15pm

Taking Advantage of MOM
After developing training workshops on how to use MyOpenMath (MOM), we are ready to share some information on how to get training, some basic features of MOM and so tips and tricks in using MOM. MOM can be adapted to use for any course that using an online homework system, and one can learn how to do so by taking our training workshop. We will also cover the pros and cons and what students have to say about MOM.

Speakers
avatar for Libby Watts

Libby Watts

Assistant Professor, Tidewater Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B14

1:15pm

Recent Findings from the OER Research Fellows
In 2015, twenty three individuals were selected as OER Research Fellows. This panel feature several OER Research Fellows discussing recent research. Topics include adoption of math, psychology and other OER, interviews with students and faculty, comparitive studies in OER quality, and much more.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:15pm - 2:05pm
Grand Ballroom

1:15pm

Breaking Tradition: A Faculty-Developed Open Writing Resource at VCU
As part of a shift toward open education at VCU, the OER committee in the Department of Focused Inquiry has begun a grassroots project to build a re-envisioned writing resource to replace our traditionally-published print handbook. The Department of Focused Inquiry primarily teaches a sequence of three courses focusing on critical thinking, information fluency and writing (among other objectives). VCU enrolls over 4000 students in this innovative first- and second-year sequence that replaced traditional freshman and sophomore composition and is taught by over 65 interdisciplinary faculty.

A faculty survey revealed that the use of an $80 required reference book was primarily limited to teaching citation and documentation. Based on these results and a series of committee discussions and votes, the OER committee gained department-wide support for developing OER to replace this expensive handbook.

Given that most of the material in our previous book is freely available and new material is frequently needed to respond to rapidly emerging technologies, we recognized an ideal opportunity to build an OER. Because our faculty already embraces a shared curriculum and frequently and freely shares teaching materials, it was a natural choice for eight faculty members, including VCU Libraries faculty, to develop a project that would initiate our larger OER endeavors. The group sees this and future OER projects as a way to extend the department's collaborative efforts to develop content and establish a comprehensive and fluid set of resources for learning across multiple audiences.

Faculty in our department and elsewhere can develop original content to be included in the OER, and the project will include links to high-quality content available on the web. Individual professors can then design their own course material by selecting from the content and tools we offer, thus giving them an unprecedented amount of control. Our approach will also allow us to quickly add new information, citation styles, and other tools based on user requests and changing technology.

In this presentation, we will explain the history of this faculty-initiated project, our current process and methods for generating content, and showcase the product thus far. We will discuss the challenges we are facing, including the need for funding and support, which has been difficult to find. Further discussion will include planning for updates in citation styles and other content and the ongoing need for programming and technical support. We welcome input, feedback, and content suggestions from our audience.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:15pm - 2:05pm
B13

1:40pm

Designing Next Generation OER for Developmental Education
How can we design learning experiences that use open educational resources to help our most at-risk student populations? Cerritos College and Lumen Learning are collaborating to deliver OER courses that use personalized and adaptive learning tools to strengthen students’ metacognitive skills and support them as they progress towards college-level work. Join two veteran course designers to see and discuss results of this collaboration. Learn how these courses help teachers identify the needs of diverse classroom populations quickly and encourage individualized outreach and support.

Speakers
JF

Joni Felt

VP for Institutional Impact, Lumen


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B17

1:40pm

Winning Friends and Influencing People: OER and Higher Education Affordability
Higher Education stakeholders, including students, parents, faculty, administrators, legislators, state higher education boards, trustees, alumni, and donors are all concerned about the high cost of education and its impact on students. Positioning OER within the broader context of college affordability creates interest in the creation and use of OER, as well as powerful allies for OER initiatives. Approaches and examples of how to communicate OER value for affordability efforts and influence these varied stakeholders will be included in this presentation. Portland State University and its use of OER and the creation of open textbooks in the context of university initiatives to increase affordability by reducing student costs for course materials will be described as one example. Insights and lessons learned will also be highlighted.

Speakers

Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B18

1:40pm

Open Licensing Policy Development and Implementation: Case studies from Higher Ed and K-12
This session will introduce attendees to the establishment of an open policy by two state-government agencies in Washington: the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) and the State Board for Community and Technical Colleges System (SBCTC).

Presenters in this session will introduce SBCTC and OSPI as two examples of how open policies might be crafted and implemented. Even though the end goal of applying an open license to course or instructional materials is the same, the creation, rollout, and implementation need to address the unique needs of the organizations. This session will address both different stages in the process and differing needs of stakeholders in Higher Ed and K-12.

SBCTC has had an open policy in place since 2010 and will speak to the the benefits, challenges, and lessons learned over the course of implementation. OSPI just put an open policy into place earlier this year and will address the initial concerns, development process, and stakeholder needs that have shaped the early stages of instituting an open policy.

Specifically, in 2010, SBCTC instituted the statewide Open Licensing Policy as an explicit measure to support that planning principle and to begin to use SBCTC-sponsored or managed initiatives to create momentum and competency around OER throughout the system. This policy is focused strongly on educational access, specifying that "All digital software, educational resources and knowledge produced through competitive grants, offered through or managed by SBCTC, will carry a Creative Commons Attributions license."

OSPI's developing Open Policy focuses on defining the copyright owner for any materials created by employees, grantees, and contractors and clarifying the requirement for open licensing of those materials used in educational programs. This policy will allow school districts, Educational Service Districts, and members of the public, to realize the educational impact from the substantial investments the state, the federal government, and foundations have made (and will continue to make) towards open educational resources.

Together, both agencies consider these policies as starting points for a more expansive/far reaching Open Policy that will eventually support not only the internal works, but also all resources produced by fellow state government agencies. Presenters will discuss the longer term goals of additional state agency outreach and uptake.

http://tinyurl.com/OpenEd2016-Open-Policy 

Speakers
avatar for Boyoung Chae

Boyoung Chae

Policy Associate, eLearning & Open Education, Washington State Board for Community & Technical Colleges
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B16

1:40pm

What could we do if all Textbooks were Open
We know about the obvious advantages of Open Textbooks, reflected in the 5Rs (as defined by David Wiley), the ability to: Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix, Redistribute. We tend to think of this on the individual scale, rights granted to an individual professor, or student.



But beyond this critical set of freedoms for authors, faculty, and students, Open (Networked) Textbooks offer something equally exciting, the possibility of building a truly open learning system. A system where the information itself (the content in the books) becomes a "public utility" upon which we can experiment and build new and better ways of interacting with information, new and better ways of helping students learn and understand.



Does this mean educational AI chatbots that interact with students while they read? Does it mean direct messaging with a prof or a TA? Does it mean a Slack channel connected to your text, with all the students from your class in it? Or all the students in the world? Does it mean new and better analytics and monitoring of students progress?



Thinking about Open (Networked) Textbooks means we must start to think about building radically new learning tools and services on top of the "raw information" -- we need to think about why, and how. And just as importantly, why not, and how not.



Let's put on our see-the-future goggles and imagine what world we want once every course in the world has an Open Textbooks available in every language. What happens next?


Speakers
HM

Hugh McGuire

Founder, Pressbooks


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B12

1:40pm

WeBWorK: Online open source homework system for Math
WeBWorK is a well-tested homework system for delivering individualized calculus problems over the web. By providing students with immediate feedback as to the correctness of their answers, students are encouraged to make multiple attempts until they succeed. With individualized problem sets, students can work together but will have to enter their own work to receive credit.

WeBWorK can present and grade any mathematics calculation problem from basic algebra through calculus, matrix linear algebra and differential equations. Its extensible answer evaluators correctly recognize and grade a wide variety of answers including numbers, functions, equations, answers with units and much more, allowing instructors and students to concentrate on correct mathematics and "ask the questions they should rather than just the questions they can."

More than 770 institutions currently use WeBWorK. WeBWork and it's 30,000 plus library of creative commons licensed problems is open source and free for institutions to use." (see map at http://webwork.maa.org/wiki/WeBWorK_Sites )

WeBWorK has its own stand-alone Learning Management System which only checks homework. But if desired the WW mathematics question rendering and answer checking engine can be used to power Moodle quiz questions, and via LTI each WW homework assignment can interoperate with Canvas, Moodle, Blackboard or other LTI capable LMS.

When using LTI to promote interoperation between WeBWorK and an LMS the students have automatic single-sign-on into their homework assignments on WW and the total grade for their assignment is passed back. It is even possible to embed a live WW question in a web page for practice use. The WeBWorK software repository is GPL licensed and can be found at https://github.com/openwebwork.

The WeBWorK information wiki is at http://webwork.maa.org/wiki. Once registered on wiki users can post to the WW forums using the links in the left margin of the wiki.

Slides of this talk and additional information at https://hosted2.webwork.rochester.edu/gage/2016oec
 

Speakers
MG

Michael Gage

Professor of Mathematics, University of Rochester
I'm one of the founders of WeBWorK on line homework


Wednesday November 2, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B14

2:15pm

The Use of Open Education Materials in Accounting
The presentation will discuss the journey of one professor using open education materials in Principles of Accounting courses. The presentation will cover how OER materials are used to replace the traditional textbook and online homework tools, the student responses to OER materials, and the grade results compared to traditional textbook courses. The presentation will also review changes to accounting OER during the past 3 years.

Speakers
DP

Debbie Porter

Associate Professor, Tidewater Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B17

2:15pm

Pay or Pay It Forward: Navigating the Licenses in Credentialing and Credit Partnerships
As a vanguard in the effort to connect meaningful credentials and college credit to its OER-based online college courses, Saylor Academy has facilitated a range of diverse institutional and partner agreements to widely distribute its twenty-two credit-recommended courses, while also honoring the rights of the original content creators. This presentation seeks to examine the question: How does a college credit recommendation change how the retained rights of content creators will be communicated to the benefactors of the recommendation.



This presentation pays particular mind to the reserved rights of third party content creators, especially commercial rights, in contexts where students may incur tutoring costs, proctoring costs, and/or tutition and fees while leveraging Saylor Academy credit-recommended courses for their own purposes. We will share examples of innovative business models which interpret that critical first modifier in the license code's prohibition against using materials for "primarily commercial purposes."



We will also briefly discuss threats and opportunities for alternative credentialing and credit-potential courses which arise from the need to respect the Share Alike and No Derivative works langauge of the licenses.



Context: For over eight years, we have published our courses under a Creative Commons Attribution license. For licensing purposes, we have defined a "course" as the structure, syllabus, learning outcomes, unit descriptions, and the framing text that accompanies resources curated from third parties. Much of these curated, third party educational materials which populate the courses are Public Domain or are licensed variably under the other Creative Commons licenses. Since 2012, twenty-two Saylor Academy courses and counting have been recommended for college credit by ACE and/or NCCRS. A larger share of our courses have also passed muster with an international credentialing authority called Qualifi, a UK Awarding Organization with ability to extend Office of the Qualifications and Examinations Regulator recognition to testing centers located throughout the English-speaking world. Thus spreading the utilization of Saylor Academy exams for practical benefit worldwide.

Speakers
avatar for Nathan Thompson

Nathan Thompson

Education Project Manager, Saylor Academy
Instructional design and pedagogy | Communicating with subject-matter experts | OER, credit, and credentialing | | Fun stuff: non-fiction storytelling, podcasts, NBA


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B18

2:15pm

An OER Policy Guide for Higher Education
In March 2016, Daniel DeMarte (Tidewater Community College) and Amanda Coolidge (BCcampus) attended the Institute for Open Leadership in Capetown, South Africa. The purpose of the Institute is to see more open licensing policies flourish, which feed the commons, promote cross-discipline collaboration, and even increase the transparency of government and philanthropic investments. During the Institute, Daniel and Amanda made a commitment to create an OER Policy Guide for High Education. The OER Policy Guide is intended to help post-secondary institutions develop their own OER policies and has suggested action items to ensure successful policy implementation and sustainability. This presentation will showcase the OER Policy Guide and walk participants through the creation, implementation, and sustainability of an effective OER policy.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B16

2:15pm

So, a Librarian, an ID, and a Faculty Member Walk into a Student Union...Creating Awareness about OER at ASU
In this 25-minute presentation an Arizona State University librarian (Anali Perry) and an instructional designer (Jenni Hayman) will describe how they have been helping to build an OER and Open Access awareness and adoption campaign at a large, four-year public research university. Tactics, successes, and challenges will be shared, and a conversation with participants will be engaged. Jenni Hayman is also in her second year of the ASU Doctor of Education program conducting research on the effectiveness of the overall campaign to increase awareness about the opportunities of OER campus-wide, and specifically increase use of OER in online courses. Anali will describe the successes and challenges of establishing and maintaining an open access repository for ASU researchers, as well as the library's efforts to promote OER.

Speakers
JH

Jenni Hayman

Arizona State University


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B12

2:15pm

How to Open an Academic Department: A Case Study
This presentation is the story of how my psychology department embarked on the winding and pot-holed road to openness. In the space of two years we went from virtually zero open educational resources and practices to a department that leads our institution in terms of the number of sections taught with open textbooks. This achievement helped our institution become the first in the province to reach 100 class adoptions, with an estimated quarter million dollars in savings for our students. Today, our faculty have authored, adopted, or adapted open educational resources such as textbooks, courses, test banks, and wikis. We have collaborated with student groups, librarians, other disciplines, administrators, government agencies, and non-profits. Our open educational resources (OER) committee facilitates open initiatives. And we have conducted research into the efficacy of open vs. traditional textbooks.



This presentation provides insights into how an academic department opened itself to the principles, practices, and possibilities of open education. This embracing of openness is remarkable given the closed nature of most academic departments. Academic departments are the scholarly enclaves where new and powerful ideas are endlessly generated. Ironically, new ideas applied to the department itself and that might improve governance models, program offerings, or traditional practices are typically met with resistance. Academic resistance to change is rooted in the nature and history of universities themselves. For more than 95% of their thousand-year-old history, universities were primarily tasked with knowledge transfer from master to student. This task was facilitated by the hierarchical, parochial, and tradition-bound governance structures and organizational processes that emerged over those centuries and which are still largely in play today. The painfully slow adoption of open educational resources and practices is the latest consequence of this reality.



This presentation will cover strategies, lessons learned, and practical advice for opening your academic department, specifically, (a) ideas for fostering a departmental culture of openness; (b) advice for addressing quality issues related to OER; and (c) suggestions for increasing departmental control over open education initiatives.


Speakers
avatar for Farhad Dastur

Farhad Dastur

Faculty Member, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I believe that open education is one of the most important and exciting developments in higher education. I have taught using open textbooks; I have consulted on a Research Methods course using an open development platform (WikiEducator); I am co-creating an Intro Psychology course for OERu; I have conducted research on the efficacy of open textbooks; and I am writing an open textbook on Critical Thinking.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B13

2:15pm

The RISE Framework: Continuously improving OER using learning analytics
In this presentation, we present The RISE Framework (Resource Inspection Selection and Enhancement). Aggregate resource use has been collected using Google Analytics and aggregate assessment data has been collected using Open Embedded Assessments. The page resources and the assessment items are linked to a common set of outcomes for the course. By examining aggregate resource use and aggregate assessment data at the resource page level, poor performing resources can be identified. Poor performing resources may include low use and low grade resources, low use and high grade resources, or high use and low grade resources. The purpose of this presentation is not to provide prescriptive advice on how to redesign OER. Instead, we provide a framework to help identify resources that need to be improved. The RISE Framework is a 2x2 matrix with use on the x-axis and grade on the y-axis resulting in four quadrants.

Quadrant one is the high use high grade quadrant. This could be explained by the resources being effective, the assessment being effective, or having strong outcome alignment. Quadrant two is the low use high grade quadrant. This could be explained by the students having high prior knowledge, the outcome being inherently easy, the content being highly effective, or the assessment being poorly written. Quadrant three is the low use low grade quadrant. This could be explained by students having low motivation or high life distractions, the module having too much material, or the resources having technical or other difficulties with access. Quadrant four is the high use low grade quadrant. This could be explained by the resources being poorly design, the assessments being poorly written, the outcomes being poorly aligned, or the learning outcome being inherently difficult. Resources that are located deep within quadrants 2, 3, and 4 should be evaluated for continuous course improvement.

Because the continuous improvement process can consume a significant amount of time and many institution's incentive systems provide greater rewards for other activities (like writing grants or publishing articles), most faculty and instructional designers never engage in the process systematically. The framework described above provides a fully automatable method for identifying the OER that could potentially benefit from continuous improvement efforts. Both the quadrant analysis and the resource type analysis can immediately provide faculty and instructional designers with the information they need to focus in quickly on the most problematic areas of a course. This framework (and others like it we hope to see emerge) can eliminate the need for significant investments of time and data science skill in the first step of the continuous improvement process - identifying what needs improving. We hope the availability of the framework will dramatically increase continuous improvement of OER-based courses as they continue to multiply in number.

Speakers
RB

Robert Bodily

Graduate Researcher, Brigham Young University
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B14

2:15pm

Experiences, perceptions, and outcomes of using open textbooks: Research from the BC OER Research Fellows
Thanks to the success of the BC Open Textbook Project and a critical mass of early adopters, British Columbia has earned a reputation for leadership in open education. However, despite that open textbooks have now been adopted at 21 out of 25 public post-secondary institutions in the province, thus far only two empirical studies have investigated the perceptions and impact of open textbooks in this context. The first of these was a survey of faculty users of OER (Jhangiani et al., 2016) while the second was a quasi-experimental efficacy study that compared the course performance of psychology students using open and commercial textbooks in both print and digital formats (Jhangiani et al., in preparation).

In this session, three Research Fellows with the Open Education Group present results from several surveys of students, faculty, administrators and instructional designers at post-secondary institutions in British Columbia.

1. A survey of students in a very large introductory physics course (800 students) at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver that started using an open textbook (embedded within the EdX platform) during the 2015-2016 academic year. This survey investigated students' use of textbooks generally, their perceptions of the open textbook used in their physics course, and the educational impact of traditional textbook costs. A comparison of student outcomes in the course during terms in which a traditional textbook was used and those in which the open textbook was used will also be reported. This study was conducted by Dr. Christina Hendricks (Department of Philosophy, University of British Columbia-Vancouver). Dr. Hendricks will also present results from a survey of all undergraduate students at UBC conducted by the student government, on how much students spend on textbooks and how often they go without buying them.

2. A survey of >400 students across 12 British Columbia post-secondary institutions enrolled in a variety of courses that adopted open textbooks. This survey assessed the experiences and perceptions of students using open textbooks, the economic and educational impact of traditional textbook costs, as well as how these outcomes are relate students' educational background, study habits, personality characteristics, and instructor ratings. This study was conducted by Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani (Department of Psychology, Kwantlen Polytechnic University).

3. A survey of students, administrators, faculty, and instructional designers at Thompson Rivers University (British Columbia) during the 2015-2016 academic year. The study assessed respondents' experiences and perceptions of using BCcampus Open Textbooks in campus-based and online courses in relation to the cost savings of open textbooks, the influence of open textbooks on the attainment of learning outcomes, and how open resources are used differently from traditional textbooks. This study was conducted by Colin Madland (Centre for Student Engagement and Learning Innovation, Thompson Rivers University).

Speakers
avatar for Christina Hendricks

Christina Hendricks

Professor of Teaching, University of British Columbia-Vancouver
UBC, Philosophy, WordPress, OER
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am the Open Studies Teaching Fellow and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. I have revised two open textbooks—for... Read More →
avatar for Colin Madland

Colin Madland

Director, Online Shenanigans, Trinity Western University


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:15pm - 3:05pm
Grand Ballroom

2:40pm

The Intersection of Teaching and Technology: Using OER and Next Gen Tools to Transform Learning
The call for more accessible, affordable, and relevant education has never been louder. Between rising tuition costs and expensive course materials, many students are being priced out of receiving higher education.

Open education has made great strides in bridging accessibility gaps and lowering costs, making quality education experiences available on a much wider level. But we've only reached the tip of the iceberg. OER can revolutionize the traditional education model by going beyond simply transforming content delivery. Enhanced with the right tools, open source content can be used to deliver truly engaging learning experiences that improve student outcomes and retention.

This session explores how Forsyth Tech is mapping their efforts to create an innovative classroom experience through the combination of OER and Next Generation Learning principles. Come learn how to use Next Gen Learning and OER to increase student engagement, outcomes, and retention, while better preparing them to be successful in today's workplace.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Moe

Joshua Moe

Founder/CEO, Odigia
Josh brings over 15 years of experience leading technology design and development teams for small, medium & large organizations. Josh spent over 4 years working in Boston’s higher-ed IT space, where his passion for education technology helped him identify opportunities to improve it with user-centric design principles. When he’s not manning the helm @Odigia, you can usually find him outdoors trailblazing in his Jeep, hanging from a cliff... Read More →
KW

Kirsten Williford

Program Coordinator Physical Sciences/Chemistry In, Forsyth Technical Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B17

2:40pm

The Advantages of Creation and Sharing: OER in Higher Education
Located within the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences (EMS) at Penn State, the John A. Dutton e-Education Institute serves as the College's learning design unit and oversees the College's online offerings. Working in close partnership with the College's five academic units and Penn State World Campus, the Dutton Institute has helped create more than 130 online courses that are part of 18 fully online certificate and degree programs.

In 2008, the Dutton Institute launched the College's Open Educational Resources initiative as a strategic effort to make the College's online courseware accessible to teachers and learners around the world who are not be able to afford to enroll in its courses or who don't need to earn academic credit. Since that time, faculty across the College have voluntarily contributed the content of 71 online courses, 4 non-credit modules, and 9 additional sets of resources, all related to topics in the Earth and mineral sciences (meteorology and atmospheric science, energy and mineral engineering, geography, geosciences, and materials science and engineering).

Making the resources available to the public was actually the easy part! The hard work has been in the form of engaging faculty in the initiative, managing the resources, promoting the availability of the resources to others within the institution and around the globe, and making the OER truly "open" - providing the right to access, adapt, and reuse; ensuring such rights are non-discriminatory (i.e., provided to everyone, everywhere); and making no limits on their use or form.

In this session, we will share our story from the very beginning of our OER efforts, highlighting the challenges we have faced, the lessons we have learned, and the issues we still confront. We will also examine how our OER initiative has helped our own faculty and students and has contributed to our international reputation for accessible, quality education. In addition, we will discuss how the suit against Berkley's open content may affect our OER offerings.

Speakers
avatar for Stevie Rocco

Stevie Rocco

Assistant Director, Dutton Institute, Penn State


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B18

2:40pm

Building a Culture for Open Textbooks at Oklahoma State University
Proponents of open textbooks, particularly at a university level, often utilize a three-prong approach in their advocacy. The first is anchored in what Okamoto (2013) termed "the textbook affordability crisis" which results in students spending "on average $1,168 on textbooks and other course materials per year" (p. 268). The second approach is time related, whereby the length, which textbooks take to go from concept to print, can render them out of date before they enter the classroom, especially in fields that are innovation driven and oriented. The third approach is to argue that the technology available today makes it possible to easily and at a low-cost distribute widely various intellectual properties (Frydenberg, Matkin, & Center, 2007) for the benefit of others world wide. Other approaches and arguments exist, but the overall goal remains to create a culture that facilitate diffusion of an idea amongst varied stakeholders such as instructors, who may need encouragement to adopt, adapt or create open textbooks.

In an effort to build a culture for open textbooks, The Oklahoma State University Library launched the Wise OSU Library Open Textbook Initiative in 2015. Modelled on a similar program offered at the Kansas State University Libraries, the Wise OSU Library Open Textbook Initiative has a mandate to encourage OSU instructors to adopt, adapt or create open textbooks for their curriculum by offering them a financial incentive to facilitate the transition. Since unveiling the program last year, the Library has reached out to instructors to inform them of the program and encourage the submission of proposals. To date, the Library has received proposals from all levels of instruction at the University, including undergraduate and graduate classes in diverse disciplines such as Educational Technology, Psychology, Soil Science and International Composition. Additionally, interest in the program is coming in from other academic departments around the campus and we anticipate the program will continue to grow moving forward.

The program has presented the new opportunities and challenges for the Library as we position ourselves to provide new services, meeting new needs in new areas with fewer financial and staff resources. It has also encouraged the Library to reach out across the campus community to explore and forge new partnerships to provide those necessary services to support the development of open textbooks at the University.

This session will discuss the development of the Wise Initiative, the Library outreach efforts to publicize the program, the process of working with instructors to create their open textbook projects, determining needs for support services, tapping into campus expertise to support the program participants, and the sometimes steep learning curve the Library is currently engaged in as we learn (often alongside our program participants) what is necessary to support and encourage the development of open textbooks at OSU. The session will also present a case study of the Educational Technology Program as they process through their goal of running a program solely on OER.

Speakers
avatar for Alesha Baker

Alesha Baker

Oklahoma State University
avatar for Dan Chaney

Dan Chaney

Associate Professor, Oklahoma State University Libraries


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B12

2:40pm

The Impact of Student Savings on Faculty Willingness to Adopt OER
This presentation will synthesize the results of two surveys completed within the last two years. The first focus will be on examining barriers to and incentives for faculty adoption of OER. Our research found that faculty members are concerned with the high costs students face in education and considered the cost savings associated with OER as an incentive to overcome adoption barriers. Little research has been done, however, to explore how students use, or would use, the money saved from OER implementation. We will present results from a survey in which students who used OER in their courses provided insight into how they repurposed these funds.

The first study will report on 218 faculty free responses regarding OER perceptions. Responses were qualitatively analyzed and ten categories were discovered in the coding process. The top three categories that indicated barriers to the adoption of OER were need more information (faculty wanted more information before they would be willing to adopt OER), lack of discoverability (faculty wanted to be able to easily find repositories of OER, and confusing OER with digital resources (faculty were unaware of the difference between digital resources and OER). The top incentives identified in this analysis to overcome these barriers include student cost benefits (saving students money), student pedagogical benefits (faculty being able to make changes to OER to improve course content and instruction), and institutional support for the adoption of OER (whether in the form of course load reduction, curricular research assistance, or library support for finding and adopting OER).

Understanding that cost savings for students is identified as the greatest incentive for faculty that may motivate them to overcome adoption barriers, looking at how students use these saved finances is valuable.

This second report presents the results of a study conducted with students at a Virginia community college who took courses that used OER. At the end of the semester, students were asked to rate their perceptions of the OER quality and their level of engagement with OER as compared to traditional textbooks. Results indicate that a majority of students found the OER to be as good as or better than traditional textbooks in both quality and engagement. These results will be mentioned, but the main purpose of the study that we will discuss is the way in which students used the money saved by using OER in their courses. Many students indicated they used the money to reinvest in their education by paying tuition, purchasing materials for other courses, or taking additional courses; day-to-day expenses and savings were the next most common responses.

It is our hypothesis that should faculty be aware of the reinvestment of these finances into paying tuition and into other facets of students' education, they would be more motivated to overcome potential adoption barriers of OER.

Speakers
avatar for Olga Belikov

Olga Belikov

Student, Brigham Young University
JR

Jane Rosecrans

Professor of English, OER Curator, Reynolds Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B13

2:40pm

A Great Babbling Bazaar: an approach to developing software for open textbooks
Pressbooks is the open source book creation platform used by many Open Textbook projects, including BCcampus, OpenSUNY, Open Oregon among others. Established work flows, tools and technologies used in the creation and maintenance of open source software provides one model that can inform what is likely necessary when creating open educational resources. Both having the tools and knowing how to organize people and resources towards accomplishing mutually beneficial goals is relevant for makers of things.



A bazaar conjures up images of variety and abundance which is relevant to the number of ideas and agendas that people bring to the table on a collaborative project. This is something we are tapping into with the development community that is growing around Pressbooks. The tools and workflows that are used to capture this diversity and produce meaningful things will be of interest to other makers and managers of openly licensed material.



Feedback is important in any open source project and helps inform the development direction and focus. Attendees will be encouraged to participate by discussing features, problems, and will be invited to join us in exploring how we can grow and improve the open source development community around Pressbooks.



Brad Payne, Senior Technical Analyst at BCcampus and Hugh McGuire, Founder of Pressbooks will talk about the development roadmap of Pressbooks, challenges and possibilities.

Speakers
HM

Hugh McGuire

Founder, Pressbooks
avatar for Brad Payne

Brad Payne

Technical Analyst, BCcampus
Brad Payne is currently the lead developer for the Open Textbook Project whose work focuses on open source software using PHP (LAMP). When not contributing to other developers’ projects on github, he builds his own and invites participation. Through exploiting API’s and with a penchant for design patterns, he helps BCcampus implement new technologies for post-secondary institutions. Prior to his current position at BCcampus, Brad worked in IT... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B14

3:15pm

Designing an open e-textbook for international use
This session will present an open textbook project that arose out of a collaboration between a US and Indian university. The collaboratively-authored text is being used in courses offered at both the US university, VCU, and at the Indian Institute of Technology (Kharagpur). In addition, students from the two universities are participating in other joint projects, including online courses and creation of a database serving both teaching and research purposes. We are planning to extend the collaboration to additional international partners and have secured partners in China, South Africa, and Russia.



The subject matter of the textbook, and of the associated courses, namely intercultural communication, calls out for an international perspective. Additionally, the principal author (US) and the collaborating author (India) approach the field from different perspectives, respectively applied linguistics and business communication. The additional partners represent more disciplinary diversity. Examples will be given of how the different viewpoints have contributed to provide a more balanced narrative. The unique perspective provided here is rarely found in commercial textbooks, which favor single national perspectives and respect traditional disciplinary boundaries.



The presentation will provide a discussion of the design of the e-text. In order to provide as much flexibility as possible, the text is modular, with no prescribed order in the units, and each unit being available separately. This allows for a mix and match usage, so instructors can leave out a particular topic or substitute in one or more chapters from other sources. The text is available in multiple formats, with the base from which all versions are created being standard HTML. Thus, content can be freely edited and repackaged. The versions made available to students in the US and India are in HTML, PDF, and EPUB. The text units also form the core of a set of online tutorials which enhance the content in a number of ways. That includes a set of learning objectives, a glossary of terms, an advanced organizer in the form of a short video clip, narrated presentations, and interactive exercises and assessments. The tutorials are available as webpages or e-books. The web version can be used as standalone webpages or integrated into a learning management system such as Blackboard or Moodle. In that case, instructors have the option of recording to the LMS gradebook individual student access to the tutorials as well as assessment scores.



Providing a variety of formats enables the text to be usable in a variety of settings, including in contexts in which mobile phone delivery is most common. One of the advantages of the e-book format is the ability to download the content once to a mobile device, where it is then available off-line. Videos in the tutorials have been reduced in length, size, and bit rate to accommodate slow connections. They are also available on YouTube, along with subtitles, an important consideration for students whose first language may not be English. The no-cost availability and international perspective of the e-text should make it attractive for others to use as well.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Godwin-Jones

Robert Godwin-Jones

Professor, School of World Studies, Virginia Commonwealth University
I am a Professor of Languages and International Studies at VCU. I do research principally in the areas of applied linguistics and language learning and technology. I write a regular column on emerging technologies for the journal "Language Learning & Technology".


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B17

3:15pm

Crowdsourcing Open Assessment Items
Open Assessments, an Open Education Resource (OER), can be more affordable, adaptable, and available by crowdsourcing content creation, evaluation, and distribution of educational materials. Affordable, adaptable, and available open assessments augment the abilities of assessment in formative environments and may serve as a resource to quickly create adaptable summative assessments. Despite the possibilities of crowdsourced OER, limitations still exist for employing a crowdsourced method including discovering incentives for generating materials, a lack of formal process for creating, evaluating, and distributing the materials, and technological barriers inhibiting growth. With time, development of a crowdsourcing platform can make open assessments and other OER more affordable, adaptable, and available for instructors and students.

Crowdsourcing would work especially well with assessment items. Research shows students can successfully create higher level assessment items with training and a review process of the items. Making open repositories successful hinge on disseminating the items effectively, and the question repositories need to have the breadth and depth of questions to form item banks large enough for formative and summative quizzing. While studies are needed to quantify the effects of crowdsourcing on the adaptability, affordability, and availability of educational resources, the success or failure of crowdsourced open assessments establishes a model to crowdsource other educational resources. Other resources that could benefit from a crowdsourced platform include textbooks, videos, and tutoring services. Crowdsourcing open assessments is a viable solution to make Open Education Resources available, adaptable, and open to enable learning autonomy.

Speakers
BM

Benjamin Mackley

Brigham Young University


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B13

3:15pm

Factors Influencing Faculty Innovation and Adoption of OER in Higher Education
This session will review the status and findings of a research study that examines the adoption process and use of faculty created OER in higher education. Faculty that use OER and have support from administration extend the institution's outreach, augment collaborations among colleagues, and benefit the global community (Perkins, 2010). However, the extent of those benefits depends on the very donations of intellectual energy and time faculty and administration are willing to contribute (Perkins, 2010). The study described in this session seeks to describe the innovation and adoption process of OER, which includes the attributes faculty believe constitute a valuable and sustainable OER and what instructional supports are meaningful to the use of faculty created OER. New innovations that improve student learning, are efficient, and save money are prevalent in higher education. Now is the time to find out why some faculty support and adopt OER while others stop.

Research studies on OER and faculty adoption have been implemented in certain global regions. For example, The Teacher Education in Sub Saharan Africa (TESSA) program developed OER to promote innovative and sustainable pedagogical change aimed to improve education in higher education institutions (Murphy & Wolfenden, 2013). Hodgkinson-Williams and Gray (2009) studied a program at the University of Cape Town with respect to key attributes of OER, to find out how to make the transition processes from traditional materials to OER more effortless for the educators. In Canada, faculty and instructional designers reviewed a large number of OER and identified challenges for potential reuse in a variety of higher education disciplines (DeVries, 2013). There is a lack of research being performed in the United States on this global issue. New studies such as this performed in the United States are putting the innovation and adoption of OER into a new context and support future innovation and adoption.

Speakers
VC

Virginia Coleman-Prisco

Northeastern University/Mercy College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B18

3:15pm

Running Errands for Ideas - How We Launched the Open Learning Lab at Lansing Community College
In mid-2015, "open" was not a word anyone would use to describe Lansing Community College and its pedagogical practices. The LMS, closed classrooms, and closed attitudes kept student learning locked up and hidden away. Assignments were disposable. Classes were closed and shut off from the world. But a little over a year later, LCC is now among the leaders in open learning. Today LCC has hosted an OER summit for the state of Michigan, launched a Domains of One's Own project, an Open Learning Lab, and the openlcc.net network. LCC is developing innovative approaches to integrating general education curriculum that faculty are enthusiastically embracing. And it didn't happen because of a grand vision by the college leadership. It happened because of the concerted grass-roots efforts of faculty and librarians, led by 4 accidental heroes.

This talk presents the tale of how we did it and what we learned along the way - all with the intent of helping (inspiring?) others to follow suit and light a revolution at their own schools. In this talk I will focus on the promotion of open learning practices, creation of our Open Learning Lab, and the innovations we are developing for our school's integrated general education initiative. We will tell the tales of our adventures, hoping to inspire and empower others to emerge as heroes.

Our accidental heroes include:

- Regina Gong, a librarian who drives our OER efforts (about which she will likely present in separate talk at OpenEd16)

- Our faculty Senate president, an historian without a lot of technology background but a great understanding of social revolutionary movements

- Leslie Johnson, (@mtflamingo) who started as "only" a composition professor, but is really a pedagogical Lara Croft. Starting with her own explorations of the pedagogical uses of social media, she surmounted numerous obstacles to emerge as champion of open and connected learning. Today she leads our Center for Teaching Excellence, our Integrated Gen Ed initiative, and has integrated a public-writing essay assignment into our core faculty development course.

- and myself, who at one-time appeared to be an ordinary economist that just got bored teaching his classes the same failed way every semester. I started with an anonymous blog to assist his classes in 2008. The resulting engagement and response from students led to converting the principles courses into a kind of open, mini-MOOC on WordPress (nobody knew about on campus, but there were rumors). That led to student blogs, student public writing assignments, and "secret" efforts to help other faculty (like Leslie) to begin experimenting ....

...and when the four of us came together, we spotted an opportunity to light the fire of an open learning revolution that has now taken hold.

Speakers
avatar for Jim Luke

Jim Luke

Professor, Lansing Community College
Currently Professor of Economics and founder of Open Learning Lab at LCC. 19 yrs teaching + 22 yrs in corporate planning & consulting. Inventor & innovator. Spent my whole life helping orgs change, invent, innovate, adapt to tech, and generally succeed. Switched to higher ed 15 yrs ago teaching economics (heterodox preferred). Still teach. Still innovating. Led strategic planning & change on campus. Now leading the LCC Open Learning... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B16

3:15pm

Does it matter how much open? Impact in learning and degrees of openness
The International Development Research Centre IDRC proclaims "openness" as a pivotal condition for development in disadvantaged contexts as an "Open Development" produces increased access, inclusion, efficiency, engagement, increased distribution, informed decision making, policy outcomes around enabling environments, and changes to political processes (empowerment). IDRC's cutting-edge research raises the issue of "quality of openness" as the range of qualities of openness within open initiatives, and the quality of the outcomes from those initiatives.

There is a great diversity of educational resources referred to as OER, but nevertheless, previous studies cluster the resources as OER with different characteristics, making it difficult to isolate openness and make meaningful conclusions about use practices and added value. This issue, what the OER Research Hub refers as a dimension of OER: "Level of Openness", is relevant as we need to dig deeper into specific types of openness as enablers for educational quality, innovation and sustainability, consequently, promoting development.

These reflections have emerged with the findings of a OER adoption and impact research investigation, "The effectiveness of OER use in student's mathematical outcomes: A case study of first and second year higher education students in Chile", sub-project 9 of the Research on Open Educational Resources for Development (ROER4D) framework (http://roer4d.org/sp-9-oer-use-in-first-year-mathematics). One of the settings of the present research, compared what we call a "less-open" OER (Khan Academy CC-BY-NC-SA) and "more-open" resource (CC-BY Teacher produced Open Textbook), where the more or less depends on the type of licensing they were coined.

As major agreement grows that a "more open" licenses (CC-BY and CC-BY-SA) are better suited for education in the institutional level policy making because they exploit the possibilities of openness, maximizing its flexibility for different type of uses, in specific, re-purpose/re-use, some questions arise:

* does this presumption also apply to impact issues in the institutional level?

* does a "more open" OER rank higher from the quality perspective?

* is a "more-open" OER or a higher level of openness of an OER make a better or bigger difference in student educational performance or teacher's practice?

* does the degree of openness an issue for underserved or developing countries from the impact or efficacy perspective?

* does the degree of openness urge to be taken into account for OER infrastructure, deploying a "more open" scenario?

Speakers
avatar for Werner Westermann

Werner Westermann

Chief of Civic Education Program, Library of National Congress of Chile


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B11

3:15pm

OER in K12 schools: An Alberta discussion
Education is a universal human right, and this right is supported by using free and legal OER. Such discussions are now in process in Alberta, in other provinces and in several US states as a way of exposing the issues and determining paths towards improving the quality of learning, while at the same time increasing the cost-effectiveness of taxpayer dollars spent on education. More importantly, the implementation of OER in Alberta schools will allow the teachers and students to take full advantage of what is becoming the world's intellectual commons - the Internet.

OER are gaining in popularity and are now being effectively introduced into primary and secondary schools in many regions of the world. K-12 educators, more than other groups, found OER useful in their practice, demonstrating "a need and a desire for continued growth and development [of OER]" (CCSSO, 2015). Open licences add significant value to content that has been developed and/or acquired with public funds. Licensing publicy-funded content as OER, makes them more accessible to the public who pay for them.

There are many benefits to using OER other than just the lower costs. Although lower costs are real and substantial. OER also provide pedagogical and technological benefits. Pedagogical benefits include their accessibility, and reusability for personalisation. The main technological benefit of OER is the ability to easily port applications between computers without digital locks or licensing restrictions.

Accessibility to and usability of content are enhanced through OER and this can be seen as one important quality measure. OER are also essential for learning analytics that is emerging as an important source of information about students and activities in the schools. OER are also an essential component of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) that are being used to deliver learning to thousands of learners, living in diverse jurisdictions. MOOCs grew out of the OER movement and their effectiveness depends heavily on the open access that OER provide. There are many ways to approach building an OER ecology and there are different ways of initiating the process.

OER can be viewed as a catalyst for educational change especially when introduced along with tablets and other mobile devices which can quite reasonably be assumed to become the norm in education worldwide. The world economy is digital, jobs are digital, our culture is digital, so our schools must become digital. The effective use of resources on digital media demands open content. The restrictions placed on commercial resources severely limit and often derail the effective use of digital devices, inhibiting educational activities, such as sharing, collaborating, mixing, reusing and adapting course materials. OER allow Alberta teachers and students to take full advantage of the world's intellectual commons that is the Internet.

Speakers
avatar for Rory McGreal

Rory McGreal

Professor, Athabasca University
I am the UNESCO/Commonwealth of Learning/International Council for Open and Distance Education Chair in Open Educational Resources and the director of TEKRI at Athabasca University


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B12

3:15pm

Making it Easier -- or Adventures in Open Textbook Adaptation: Finding our way
The great promise of OER is that they are customizable, but faculty are often stumped when they try to figure out how, in practice, to adapt an open resource. The Open Textbook Network (OTN) commissioned a working group to write a best practices document on overcoming the technical hurdles to adapting open textbooks. The group, hailing from five different institutions, consists of a library dean, two open education librarians, a former editor-in-chief of a university press, and a coordinator for statewide OER initiatives. Individuals have a variety of skills and abilities including current or past experience as production managers, multimedia editors, and digital publishing coordinators. Our presentation will summarize findings of the group, propose solutions to common technical stumbling blocks, and identify areas where further research and development are needed.

Presenters include Anita Walz, Cheryl Cuillier, Karen Lauritsen, Kathy Labadorf, Amy Hofer, Peter Potter, Annie Johnson, Richard Saunders 

Speakers
avatar for Cheryl Cuillier

Cheryl Cuillier

OER Coordinator, UA Libraries
I'm the Summon Coordinator at the University of Arizona Libraries and led the project team that implemented Summon 2.0 in 2013-14. I also led the project team that evaluated various discovery products for the library. Within our Research & Learning Department, I coordinate the library's Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives and serve as a liaison librarian for business and architecture.
avatar for Amy Hofer

Amy Hofer

Coordinator, Statewide Open Education Library Serv, Open Oregon Educational Resources
avatar for Kathy Labadorf

Kathy Labadorf

Reference, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, UConn Library
Leading a burgeoning OER Initiative at UConn. Excited about the Social Justice elements of Open and Creative Commons licenses. Talk to me about Open Pedagogy and how to grow that initiative at a Research 1 University!
avatar for Karen Lauritsen

Karen Lauritsen

Director of Publishing and Collections, Open Textbook Network
avatar for Peter Potter

Peter Potter

Director, Publishing Strategy, Virginia Tech
I'm looking for good ideas on how to develop and enhance library publishing workflow
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Open Education, Copyright & Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University Libraries, Virginia Tech. In this role, she leads library exploration and initiatives related to open education, OER, and online learning; she serves as a library liaison to the Legal studies, Economics, and Mathematics Departments at Virginia Tech and manages several active collaborations with the University’s learning technologies and... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B14

3:40pm

Students and Open Education - How to Engage Student Leaders on College Campus
Open Education is a critical topic that brings together a number of stakeholders - educators, administrators, book stores, libraries and students. Due to the nature of student governments, student's tenure working on student-centered issues on college campuses can be transient and short-lived . In order to help grow the open education movement on college campuses, it is critical for administrators, librarians, faculty and other valuable stakeholders to understand the role that student leaders and advocates can play in open education efforts, develop strategic action plans for engaging student leadership on campuses, and understand the value and role that students can play in shaping this conversation.



As a student leader at West Virginia University, I was greeted with open arms by my institution's Library and administration. Our open education movement started from the students, and morphed in to a university-wide initiative aimed at brining low-cost, high-quality open educational resources to our campus. As I have engaged on the national level in regards to this important topic, I have found that student leadership on other campuses are not as engaged or focuses on open education. This can change, and it starts with understanding the role of student leaders as it pertains to open education.



Students can be terrific champions for open education, but they also need to be given measurable, tangible goals to accomplish. Whether this is working on outreach efforts, sponsoring open education-themed events or launching social media campaigns to help bring awareness to open education efforts on campus students are powerful catalysts. The key to increasing student participation and engagement in open education efforts is simple - and in this presentation, I will share that with session participants. From the perspective of a student, I believe I provide a unique perspective on this issue and can give conference participants valuable insight about the role of the student leader and advocate in the open education movement.



Understanding what makes the student the leader is critical, and it will allow for university librarians, administrators and faculty to help engage student leaders in a meaningful, relevant way. Open education is a powerful movement, and the power of the movement can and will be strengthened by students adding their voice to this important conversation. We must all be a part of the conversation if we are all going to be a part of the solution.



For any further questions or comments, please contact me! My email is bnhumphrey @mix.wvu.edu.



BIO:

Blake Humphrey is a junior at West Virginia University majoring in Political Science and Economics.Blake is a former Member of the West Virginia University Student Government Association's Board of Governors. During his time in SGA, he served as an intern, and he has worked tirelessly to advance the cause of college and textbook affordability.Currently, Blake is serving on the Library Textbook Committee and the Library Student Advisory Committee. Mainly, Blake's work with textbook affordability revolves around Open Source Textbooks (OSTs) and Open Educational Resources (OERs).

Speakers
BH

Blake Humphrey

West Virginia University Student Government Association


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B17

3:40pm

Massachusetts Community Colleges Go Open! A New Statewide Initiative
OER is growing in Massachusetts! A new statewide OER initiative, funded by the federal TAACCCT grant, kicked off this year for the Massachusetts community colleges. While many of the 15 community colleges had an existing OER project, this new initiative seeks to develop a collaborative process where faculty can work together to adopt, adapt and if necessary, build, high quality OER materials for courses that are common across the state.

Led by Sue Tashjian and Jody Carson of Northern Essex Community College in Haverhill, MA, this project began with the development of an OER council that included representation from each of the 15 community college campuses. The council's main focus is to promote an Open philosophy and to encourage collaboration on OER adoption and development across the state. Go Open grants are the council's main project, scaled from NECC's Adopt Open initiative. These mini-grants solicit proposals from faculty across the state seeking to "Go Open" in their courses. The council also supports statewide events which promote and provide training on OER pedagogy and is selecting a common OER repository where materials can easily be found and shared.

Sue and Jody will share the model of the initiative they developed including their role as consultants to the other colleges, the Go Open grant proposal written by the council, the resources collected so far and an update on the project. The presentation will also include information on the benefits and challenges to working with 15 very different and independent community colleges and share some of the unique ideas developed through the collaboration. And, of course, all the materials that go with this work!

Speakers
avatar for Jody Carson

Jody Carson

Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education, Northern Essex Community College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B18

3:40pm

Open Practice as a Tool for Educational Change
Often institutions focus on textbook cost and saving money for students as a reason to invest in open education. Opportunity and access are important missions, and OER help us to meet those missions by focusing on the value of saving students money. This very necessary part of OER initiatives causes many of us to focus on the adoption of OER- because the more adoptions we can pursue the greater cost savings to students. However, OER is about more than saving students money. Open education initiatives should also focus on intrinsic motivations toward education such as interest in classes and high-value learning experiences. Open practices are the key toward moving the institutional conversation beyond savings and adoptions to scaled and sustainable growth of pedagogies that value openness above the access to education. After all, access isn't the true goal of educational institutions; our goal is to graduates who think critically and engage responsibly with our communities and world. Open education should be bigger than saving students money so that they can afford to take more classes. Open education initiatives, at their best, should focus on the rights of open access, open licensing, and open practices to encourage the best learning experiences for a variety of students.

At Pierce College our efforts focus heavily on adoptions, but greater emphasis is being made on open practices that encourage leadership, faculty, and students to focus on the power of openness as a way of practicing education. This presentation will discuss the philosophy of open practices and how to grow them into the opportunity to improve institutional goals through focusing on the core principles of openness and institutional interest in improved student achievement.

Speakers
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B16

3:40pm

Open Textbook Student Usability Research Results
Most research on open textbooks concentrates on student savings from faculty switching from traditional texts to open texts. John Hilton III and Barbara Illowsky researched student perceptions of the quality of and value of learning from an open textbook, instead of an assigned traditional textbook. Two studies were completed. The first study focused on student perceptions of "Collaborative Statistics," one of the first open textbooks produced by Connexions. This open textbook was produced in in single text color. The second study was conducted two years after the first study and with a different group of students. It focused on perceptions of the more fully developed "Introductory Statistics" by OpenStax College. The OpenStax OER was produced in color and looks more like a traditional textbook, when printed, than the original text did.

The authors discovered that most students considered both versions of the open textbook, whether used online or printed, as good as or better than traditional textbooks they typically used. Most students would prefer to continue using open textbooks in order to save money. The authors were surprised that there was not a significant difference in quality perception between the original and the improved versions, even though faculty perceive the color version a higher quality.

The presenters will share the results of the studies. They will also facilitate a discussion among the participants, as to the implications for future open textbook development and use.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Illowsky

Barbara Illowsky

Dean, Basic Skills & OER, FHDA CCD - OEI


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B11

3:40pm

Communicating 'Open'
Whether you are a seasoned open education advocate or a newcomer to the movement, communicating about "open" can be a challenge. The English language alone has more than 40 definitions of "open" (according to Dictionary.com), and the term has gained myriad nuanced meanings to different communities, from free software to open access research to open education. Effective communication is the key to success for any movement, so it's important for OER advocates to hone their skills.

The session will provide a general overview of communication in an advocacy environment, with tips and tricks learned during the session leaders' more than 15 combined years in campaign organizing.

Communications topics include:

- Defining your audience

- Constructing an effective message

- Cutting back on jargon without diluting the facts

- Communicating through stories and values

- Working with the media

- Counteracting "open washing"

- Responding to bad press

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Nick Shockey

Nick Shockey

Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC
Nick Shockey is the Director of Programs & Engagement for SPARC and founding Director of the Right to Research Coalition, an international alliance of student organizations that promote Open Access to the results of research through advocacy and education. As the Director of Programs & Engagement, Nick is responsible for growing SPARC’s engagement with members and the wider community, managing SPARC’s digital platforms, and... Read More →


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B12

3:40pm

Enabling open education in Australian universities with an Open Education Licence Toolkit
One of the most critical challenges confronting the effective implementation of Open Educational Practices (OEP) in the Australian higher education sector has been copyright law and the licensing of educational resources for online access (Trounson, 2012). This is because Australian copyright law currently provides less flexibility around the use of copyright material for education than the law in other jurisdictions such as the US, Canada and Singapore (Harris, 2013). Also, there has been a perceived lack of understanding of copyright and licensing for effective engagement with Open Educational Practices (Bossu, Brown, & Bull, 2014). With funding obtained via the Australian Government Office of Learning and Teaching, Swinburne University in partnership with the University of Tasmania have undertaken a two year project to understand and address these challenges.

Fundamentally, the project allowed for the bringing together of key stakeholders to gain an understanding of the broader debate around copyright law reform, licensing and the delivery of practical outcomes for teaching and learning practitioners. The project team surveyed business and teaching professionals in Australian universities and drew upon existing research into pedagogical and business methods for the creation, use and delivery of open educational online resources. There was also an examination of existing intellectual property research and government and industry reports on copyright exceptions and the digital environment. The major deliverable of the project was the development and implementation of a practical Open Education Licence Toolkit for use by Australian universities informed by the project data collected, user experience research and stakeholder testing.

This presentation will provide an overview of this two year project, including the methodology applied and some of its outcomes. In addition, it will also discuss some of the key research findings regarding the current state of play of OEP in Australian higher education in comparison to previous research of similar nature. Most importantly, this presentation will explore and demonstrate the interactive online Toolkit that was developed to support Australian university teachers and managers to make effective business and pedagogical decisions around online education materials and services.

You can try the toolkit for yourself at http://oel.edu.au/kit4V/ 

References

Bossu, C., Brown, M., & Bull, D. (2014). Adoption, use and management of Open Educational Resources to enhance teaching and learning in Australia. Sydney: Australian Government Office for Learning and Teaching. Retrieved from http://www.olt.gov.au/system/files/resources/CG10_1687_Bossu_Report_2014.pdf.

Harris, R. (2013). Universities Australia Member Update. (33). Canberra: Universities Australia.

Trounson, A. (2012, 7 November). Copyright fears for online offerings. The Australian. Retrieved from http://www.theaustralian.com.au/higher-education/copyright-fears-for-online-offerings/story-e6frgcjx-1226511715912


Speakers
avatar for Luke Padgett

Luke Padgett

Manager, Teaching Innovation and Copyright, University of Tasmania
Luke Padgett is the Manager of Teaching Innovation and Copyright with the Tasmanian Institute of Learning and Teaching (TILT) at the University of Tasmania. His work and research primarily focus on Open and Non-traditional approaches to education in higher education, specifically challenges related to learning resources, copyright, intellectual property, licencing and engagement.


Wednesday November 2, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B14

5:00pm

Wednesday Night Reception Sponsored by OpenLearn
Wednesday November 2, 2016 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Marriott Hotel Salon F 500 East Broad Street Richmond Virginia 23219
 
Thursday, November 3
 

9:00am

Criss Cross: One hand washes the other
The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) recently developed a new Framework for Information Literacy in response to the changing information environment and how people operate within it. The Framework opens up opportunities for connections, collaboration and conversations about learning.

At the same time, open pedagogy and open educational practices seek to step beyond OER as free textbooks to a transformative model of learning and teaching. Within Ehlers' framework for OEP and Hegarty's attributes of open pedagogy, there are multiple openings for connections to information literacy concepts.

This presentation will explore the web of connections among the frameworks, concepts and attributes, in order to promote a synergy between the advocates for information literacy and open education.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Bond

Paul Bond

Library Instruction Coordinator, University of Pittsburgh-Johnstown
I'm into lifelong learning, open education, information literacy, and playing around on the internet. That why I became a librarian.



Thursday November 3, 2016 9:00am - 9:25am
B16

9:00am

Beyond the Textbook: Student Performance in an Anatomy and Physiology Lab with an OER and a Traditionally Published Lab Manual
Data on textbook costs reveals hard science courses have the highest per-book cost of any discipline (Kopf, 2015). These costs are further compounded by additional expenditures students in these courses must incur such as lab fees, equipment costs, and lab manuals. Given in hard science courses, almost 30 percent of students do not purchase the textbook (Schick & Marklein, 2013), this can contribute to the high withdrawal and failure rates observed in these courses (Chen & Soldner, 2013).
One option to help mitigate these costs is to focus on open educational resources (OER); OER represent a resource that can be shared at no cost, where content is freely available and open for use via public domain or an open license. OpenStax College has been a main facilitator in the creation and distribution of open peer-reviewed textbooks, especially for introductory courses in the hard sciences. While this is a strong first step, it does not address the additional costs faced by students, particularly with associated lab manuals, which can average $150 per lab.

This presentation focuses on the learning outcomes and student perceptions associated with a new, open lab manual developed to pair with the current OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology textbook. This lab manual was developed and will be piloted in both lab sections of the anatomy and physiology course sequence at the University of Georgia with 160 undergraduate students in Summer 2016.

For this study, students will be randomly assigned within their lab section to using the open lab manual or the traditionally published lab manual. The university department is covering the cost of the traditionally published lab manual for the purposes of this study to assure all students receive no-cost learning materials. By using the randomized design within the lab sections, differences between the teaching assistants should be mitigated.

This presentation details the results of this initial lab manual implementation by addressing the following:

- How did students perceive the quality of the open lab manual versus a traditional lab manual at the beginning of the semester versus the end of the semester?

- Was there a difference in lab performance (class final course average, number of students receiving a C or better) between students who used the open lab manual and students in past semesters who used a traditional text?

At the end of the summer semester, data is expected to show that while students may have had hesitations or quality concerns regarding the OER at the beginning of the term, these were mitigated over the course of the semester. Data is also expected to reveal there were no student performance differences between the groups using the OER versus the groups using the traditional lab manual. The goal is that this study would offer a compelling case for both the implementation of OER as the primary learning material in hard science courses, as well as for the development of accompanying lab manuals to continue to decrease costs for students and increase retention in hard science programs.

Speakers
DC

Deanna Cozart

Coordinator of Open Educational Resources, The University of Georgia


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:00am - 9:25am
B11

9:00am

Critical Instructional Design and Open Education
bell hooks argues that "To teach in a manner that respects and cares for the souls of our students is essential if we are to provide the necessary conditions where learning can most deeply and intimately begin."



Critical Instructional Design is a theoretical approach to the design of teaching and learning that grows out of the tenets of Critical Pedagogy as forwarded by educators like Paulo Freire and bell hooks. Assuming that education is a liberatory, discursive act of resistance, and one that now takes place on a landscape of digital technology, Critical Instructional Design seeks methodologies that embrace learner agency, most often in the form of open educational practices and resources.



It also resists traditional approaches to instructional design, born out of technical writing and training lineages, that rigidly define design processes and outcomes. Just as we might expect faculty to move toward a "radically open" approach to teaching (hooks, 1989), instructional designers too must embrace, examine, be affected by openness, and relish the uncertainty openness creates in our work. This uncertainty makes space for emergence in instructional design. Critical instructional design does not accept openness as an uncontested virtue, but rather views openness as an approach to raising questions about our practices and goals, while also questioning what kinds of closures come with openness.



In this presentation, we will consider the ways that instructional design, using the tools of open education and practices that can subvert the dominant modes of digital pedagogy, as well as the dominant modes of openness (and/or the performativity of openness) that, as Bonnie Stewart notes, "reduc[es] the digital to instrumental, task-based impersonality, rather than recognizing it as a human space with all the potential - educative and destructive, both - that that implies." We will resist the call to transform instructional designers into "learning engineers" as we ask: How might instructional designers problematize the closed-ness of educational technologies like the LMS and work with faculty to design with respect and care for learners? How does instructional design make room for passion, need, difference, beauty? How do we anticipate the broad and specific intersectionalities of our learners, and what they bring to the table? And how can open educational resources, an "open" classroom, facilitate these objectives?

Speakers
avatar for Amy Collier

Amy Collier

Associate Provost for Digital Learning, Middlebury College
avatar for Amy Slay

Amy Slay

Instructional Designer, Middlebury Institute for International Studies at Monterey


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:00am - 9:25am
B13

9:00am

OER Algebra Sequence: from One to All Sections
Tompkins Cortland CC has used Open Educational Resources (OER) for Intermediate Algebra, saving students $200,000 in 5 semesters, with significant increase in success and retention. During 2016, College Algebra and Trigonometry were added, followed by Precalculus, Beginning Algebra, and Statistics. Resources, data, and lessons learned will be shared.

Speakers
avatar for Sophia Georgiakaki

Sophia Georgiakaki

Professor of Mathematics, Tompkins Cortland Community College



Thursday November 3, 2016 9:00am - 9:25am
B14

9:00am

The Faces of OER: Student Reflections on the Z Degree Experience
Participating students: Michael Bounds, Brenna Dietrich, Rickkita Taylor, and Jeremis Windbush.

A documented need for educators to remove barriers to access and increase student success continues to push OER higher on the list of institutional priorities. The focus of many initiatives is on policy, course redesign, data collection and the economic sustainability of OER. This presentation shifts the focus to the other side of the desk - the students' perspective. This session will allow attendees the opportunity to hear about how removing traditional textbooks and replacing them with OER changes the student learning experience. Students will discuss the challenges and benefits of moving from a traditional textbook to OER in both online and face-to-face courses. The panel will also address how OER changed their classroom experiences and the personal impact of using OER. After sharing their unique experiences, there will be an opportunity for attendees to ask the students questions.

Speakers
DR

Diane Ryan

Dean, Tidewater Community College


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am
B12

9:00am

OER Advocacy: Lessons and Strategies
This mega-panel will discuss lessons learned about effective OER adoption advocacy.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Sarah Cohen

Sarah Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network
avatar for Amanda Coolidge

Amanda Coolidge

Senior Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
BCcampus
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am the Open Studies Teaching Fellow and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. I have revised two open textbooks—for... Read More →
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:00am - 10:15am
Grand Ballroom

9:25am

Building an OER-EAP Corpus
A language corpus is a collection of language texts, which can be both written and transcribed spoken, that is usually stored as a text file on a computer or a web server. The plural form of corpus is corpora. Often a concordancing program is used to search the corpus for language use patterns which can be helpful in language teaching and learning. The theoretical underpinnings of using corpora in the classroom can be attributed to the early work of Hymes (1966) and later Canale and Swain (1980) and Canale (1983) in their Communicative Competence models and usage-based approaches to second language learning and pedagogy (see Tyler, 2010). These approaches are based on the idea that the primary purpose for learning language is communication and using real target language in the classroom should be central to classroom language instruction. Coupled with this approach is the multidimensional nature of real language use and the various ways in which language forms connect to language meanings. Corpus-based pedagogy helps the learners understand and work through sometimes subtle meaning differences in language structure. This presentation focuses on the development of an OER corpus which can be used in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) classrooms for teaching and materials development. The OER-EAP corpus was created by the presenter using OpenStax academic texts and is freely available for EAP teachers and linguistic researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Brent Green

Brent Green

Associate Dean, SLCC SAT, ESL, CAR & Testing


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:25am - 9:50am
B16

9:25am

Advocating for open: The instructional design experience
Instructional designers can have an important role as change agents in institutional pedagogical approaches and practices in the development of open and online courses and programs. They are in a position to influence awareness and adoption of open educational practices (OEP) as these relate to course and program development. Instructional designers are often on the front line of implementation of OEP including advocacy for and incorporation of open educational resources (OER) and open pedagogical learning designs. They often need to grapple with both the institutional barriers and practical challenges that arise in this role. Based on analysis of survey and other data this study explores the practices and strategies for OEP and OER implementation reported by instructional designers in higher education institutions across Canada.




Speakers
avatar for Irwin DeVries

Irwin DeVries

Interim Associate Vice-President, Open Learning, Thompson Rivers University, Open Learning
TRU


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:25am - 9:50am
B13

9:25am

The OER World Map Project- Building an 'Open Operations Room' for the OER Community
1973 the ambitious Cybersyn project aimed at developing a real time control system for the Chilean economy. Based on Stafford Beers cybernetic management theory an "Operations Room" was developed, bundling all collected information, which was transmitted at that time with the help of telex machines.



2016, 43 years later, our capacity to collect and process data has multiplied. Nevertheless it is still difficult to get an overview of the fast growing global OER community, causing redundant development of infrastructure and content as well as missed chances for cooperation, reuse and knowledge transfer.



The OER World Map project is providing a solution for this problem by providing an "Open Operation Room" for the OER community which can be used by everyone to get high quality information on current, past and future OER activities. By combining elements of both social network and management information systems it fosters cooperation and sharing within the OER community and supports effective use of resources allocated worldwide by governments, cooperations and the civil society.



While the dataset provided by the OER World Map supports all types of cooperative action within the OER community, we are currently focusing on following main user stories (Epics):

1. As an OER actor I would like to find other OER actors and connect with them, so that I can cooperate in a coordinated way and share resources and knowledge with them.

2. As a teacher or learner I would like to get qualified, complete and current lists of existing OER offers, so that I can easily find open resources, which fit to my current learning or teaching context.

3. As an OER policy maker I would like to get meaningful statistics and oversights on the status of the OER movement in order to take and defend decisions in favor of OER.



After an initial competitive prototyping (phase I) The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation funded the North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Center (hbz) 2015 to develop a first version of the production system, which allowed to collect relevant data on organizations, persons, services, projects and events (phase II). The current phase III of the project will bring refined usability, new functionality and a significantly increased population of the map.



In early 2016 we provided a printed report called the "OER Atlas" for the German OERde Festival, which includes an estimated 80 percent of OER activities in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. By doing so, we provided a proof of concept, that it is possible to collect all OER related data for a complete country with reasonable effort.



The presentation will summarize the main results of phase III of the project and give an outlook on the development planned for 2017.



Beer, Stafford: "_Plattform for Change", Chichester 1975

Neumann, Jan: "_The German speaking OER landscape in numbers", online available under https://oerworldmap.wordpress.com/2016/03/18/the-german-speaking-oer-landscape-in-numbers/

Neumann, Jan: "_Printing the OER World Map: The OER Atlas", online available under https://oerworldmap.wordpress.com/2016/03/08/printing-the-oer-world-map-the-oer-atlas/


Speakers
JN

Jan Neumann

Head of Legal Affairs & Organization, North Rhine-Westphalian Library Service Centre


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:25am - 9:50am
B14

9:50am

Open Oregon Educational Resources: One and Three-Quarters Years (and counting!)
Having a statewide OER librarian for Oregon's community colleges was a brand-new position when I started my job in January 2015. But it was backed by years of prior OER work on various campuses and a great deal of interest from faculty, support staff, and administrators. With that groundwork established, Open Oregon Educational Resources takes a top-level view and connects OER initiatives happening at 17 separate community colleges that are not in a system.

This presentation will cover the challenges that I initially perceived and the reality of the past one and three-quarters years. With a tremendous amount of shared effort from partners all over the state, Open Oregon has created a name and online presence for Oregon community college OER efforts; encouraged adoption by sharing information, funding projects, and showcasing successes; and offered in-person and online trainings to build capacity throughout the state. There is growing interest in open degree pathways and a cohort of 35 grant projects underway.

This spring Oregon also hired a statewide OER Specialist for all of higher ed, including our 7 universities. This position within state government is a new colleague and partner for community college OER champions and can advocate within the legislative process. This provides a complement to my position at the community college level.

What's working? What will I never try again? What's next? Stop by this session and find out.

Open Oregon Educational Resources connects OER initiatives happening at 17 community colleges. What's working? Stop by and find out.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Hofer

Amy Hofer

Coordinator, Statewide Open Education Library Serv, Open Oregon Educational Resources


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:50am - 10:15am
B17

9:50am

It's Not About the Books: Let's talk about Open Pedagogy
We talk a lot about the money saved, but the money saved isn't the true value of open education. Students are more engaged when they get to contribute to course and assessment design. Come hear about a smorgasbord of student led projects that live beyond the quarter and give value to the world. Learn about a repository tool that will help us collaborate on open pedagogy project ideas and share open educational resources created by students.

Speakers
avatar for Christie Fierro

Christie Fierro

Instructional Designer & Open Educational Resource, Tacoma Community College


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:50am - 10:15am
B16

9:50am

A Quantitative Analysis on the Efficacy of OER
At the core of the discussion of OER adoption, one of the main questions raised is the efficacy of OER. There is currently very limited research done to address this question. In our study, we conduct a quantitative analysis on the efficacy of OER for a calculus course with a large enrollment at Purdue University to contribute to the literature in this area.

We compare students' performances on the final exam in Fall 14 and Fall 15, where commercial versus OER materials are used respectively. The comparison is conducted at the course wide level, as well as at the subgroup levels based on students' demographic, socioeconomic and academic backgrounds.

Speakers
avatar for Huimei Delgado

Huimei Delgado

Continuing Lecturer, Purdue University


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:50am - 10:15am
B11

9:50am

Establishing actual costs of textbooks across curricula: Data from the Virginia Community College System
The dominant form of open education in North America is the proliferation of open textbooks and OER with the aim of making education more affordable and accessible. However, much of the work in higher education on this front is built upon ill-founded claims about the costs of educational materials for students (Hill, 2015). In response, Quill West, Open Education Project Manager for the Pierce College District, devised a simple approach to collecting data from bookstores to establish costs based in localized contexts. The methodology was shared through the LibOER group of the Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC). All members were invited to contribute their own data with the hopes of ultimately collecting a robust data set to represent textbook costs in a variety of contexts from across North America. To date, colleagues from Temple University, UMass-Amherst, and the Oregon Community Colleges (Hofer, 2016) have collected and shared their data.

One particularly appropriate candidate for establishing textbook costs is the Virginia Community College System (VCCS), consisting of 23 community colleges across the state. As of fall 2014, the VCCS reported that 183,443 students were enrolled at the 23 community colleges (VCCS, 2015). In order to provide greater access and affordability, colleges in the VCCS began exploring OER in 2013. That year, Tidewater Community College was the first college in the VCCS to develop and offer a Z-degree program in Business Administration. During the same time, Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) developed the Digital Open OER-Based General Education project, which provided two pathways to a Z-degree for online students either in General Studies or Social Science. As of fall 2015, over 10,000 NOVA students have taken a zELI OER course since the fall 2013 launch. Building on these successes and as part of the ambitious Complete 2021 strategic plan, the VCCS partnered with Lumen Learning to launch the Zx23 program in 2015. With funding from a Hewlett Foundation grant, 16 of the 23 Virginia Community Colleges were provided training and technical support to build Z-degree programs. To date, the Zx23 program has resulted in more than 70 OER courses being made available.

Thus, establishing student costs outside of these OER program offerings will help to solidify the evaluation of impact as well as contribute to the larger national dataset. In this session, we will present our data collection methods that are customized for the VCCS context as well as the data collected in summer and fall 2016. Using descriptive statistics and GIS software, data will be analyzed across each of the colleges to reveal cost patterns among and between the state's community colleges. By compiling a localized empirical data set, our aim is to provide the VCCS with robust data to help support policy and program development around OER. Establishing actual student costs will support the argument for OER by basing the potential savings in real numbers instead of the estimates provided by the National Association of College Stores or The College Board.

Speakers
avatar for Amanda Carpenter-Horning

Amanda Carpenter-Horning

First Year Retention Coordinator, John Tyler Community College
I spend my days navigating the world of higher education and the occasional evening blogging. I am native of Richmond and I currently reside in the suburbs with my husband Jerad, and our dog Clark.
avatar for Jamison Miller

Jamison Miller

PhD Candidate, The College of William and Mary
I am a doctoral candidate and early-career researcher in open education theory, policy, and practice.


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:50am - 10:15am
B12

9:50am

Learning By Doing in Open Education
Like the internet itself, much of OER started out as static text and images. However, years of cognitive science research tells us that students learn by doing - interacting with the content through questions, activities, and simulations.  The ability to deliver immediate, targeted feedback is one of the key benefits of online learning.  How do we continue the journey away from static content to rich interactive courses, and what open tools are there to help us with this journey?

Speakers
RS

Ross Strader

Director of Learning Engineering, Lumen Learning


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:50am - 10:15am
B13

9:50am

Learning Circles: Online Learning, Offline
In 2015, Peer 2 Peer University and Chicago Public Library developed Learning Circles: lightly--facilitated study groups for learners who want to take online courses together, in-person. Meeting weekly in the library for 6-8 weeks, patrons worked through online courses in subjects ranging from resume writing to public speaking to web design. Retention rates over 6-8 weeks were close to 50%, very high for both online courses and for adult programming at libraries. Learning Circles are now an ongoing feature of CPL's programming, and P2PU has released and open source toolkit for running Learning Circles that communities around the world are starting to use (see p2pu.org for more details).



The development of Learning Circles address a number of issues at the core of the OER movement. These include the disconnect between open access and equal access, the role of nonformal learning environments in promoting OER, and better understanding how technology and social support can leverage OER to create empowering and meaningful learning experiences. In this presentation, the P2PU Learning Lead, Grif Peterson, will discuss the affordances and limitations of OER in the Learning Circle model along the lines of these issues.



Equal Access: Just because resources are freely available, doesn't mean they are equally shared. The P2PU/CPL relationship strived to expand OER and online course dissemination to a wider audience, and this was largely successful. More than half of the Chicago Learning Circle attendees did not have a college degree, and only about half had a computer at their home. 40% had never heard of online courses before, and 65% had never taken an one. The promotional efforts to get new learners in the door and the work required to onboard them into the world of online learning garnered us a number of insights as to how OER can position itself for maximum exposure for first-time online learners.



Nonformal Environments: We will discuss the benefits of teaming up with libraries to disseminate OER, and how such partnerships might be better leveraged in the future to align OER with the extensive programming already offered. Most libraries have an e-learning webpage where expensive, licensed-based learning materials sit and often gather digital dust. Our proposition is that less money should be spent on licensing and more should be spent on making sure online resources are utilized by patrons. This, of course, requires that OER cater to the needs and background of library patrons, something we have found with varying degrees of success.



Support for OER: Through the Learning Circle toolkit, we've developed a methodology and supporting technology that has the potential to increase learner access, retention, and outcomes without a formal teacher. There are a number of lessons from our experience that will be relevant to those who create, disseminate, and use OER. We think these lessons are transferable to a number of domains outside of libraries, including community college and higher education institutions, adult literacy programs, community centers, and online learning providers.



We are looking forward to joining this discussion!


Speakers
GP

Grif Peterson

Peer 2 Peer University


Thursday November 3, 2016 9:50am - 10:15am
B14

10:15am

Break
Thursday November 3, 2016 10:15am - 10:45am
TBA

10:45am

The HOW of Adapting an Open Textbook
Adapting or modifying educational resources is what gives open the competitive advantage over its commercial counterparts. Adapting an educational resource means that a faculty member can change the content to best suit the learning outcomes of their course; it means that students can take an active role in adapting and changing material for assignment and assessment purposes. However, adapting is rarely done across open educational projects. BCcampus's Open Textbook project is one of the few open projects to have successfully completed a series of adaptations on a number of open textbooks. This presentation will walk you through the steps of HOW to adapt an open textbook. Participants will be introduced to a step-by-step approach to adaptation, including technical format considerations and style guide supports. Participants will leave the session with an adaptation toolkit, produced by BCcampus, that is CC licensed and can be adapted for the needs of each institution or project.

Speakers
avatar for Lauri Aesoph

Lauri Aesoph

Manager, Open Education, BCcampus
I support the development and sharing of open educational resources in British Columbia. I have project managed and led workshops and webinars on the adoption, adaptation, and creation of open educational resources. I also provide technical and instructional design support for the B.C. Open Textbook Project as a Manager of Open Education, as well, blog about and create support guides and other materials for faculty and staff working in this area... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 10:45am - 11:10am
B18

10:45am

Making OER Dynamic: Platform and Meta-tagging Considerations in Michigan

In this presentation, we tell the story of Michigan's path towards a statewide strategy to develop and promote Open Educational Resources for K-12 schools. 

Michigan’s OER efforts are underway.  The initial work on OERs created by Michigan educators centers on social studies curriculum support materials through the MiOpen Books project.  OERs that support other content areas, and will enhance the existing social studies materials, will be drawn from existing resources available around the nation and beyond. 

As the OER movement continues, the state is now examining the use of a more robust platform to house existing and emerging resources and align the platform with the state education network (SEN) infrastructure and connect resources to student academic achievement data as we migrate to an integrated, personalized learning environment. A critical component of this enhanced approach will include how the meta-tagging of resources in ways that will allow educators to best personalize and integrate resources on behalf of student learning.

In February of 2016, the Michigan Department of Education (MDE) announced that it had joined the U. S. Department of Education's (USED) #GoOpen campaign. Joining #GoOpen was an important moment in solidifying the MDE's ongoing process towards embracing OER in K12.

The MI Open Book Project is a multi-year textbook development project (http://textbooks.wmisd.org/index.html) that is funded through the MDE's Technology Infrastructure Readiness Grant (TRIG). The project has developed and continues to develop versions of open textbooks aligned to Michigan's curriculum, geography, and unique history.

In 2016, the MDE is attempting to build on this work by expanding its OER focus beyond a 1-1 replacement of publisher-produced textbooks with OER textbooks. The MDE sees OER as integral to its efforts to provide dynamic and personalized curriculum to its 1.5 million-plus students.

We specifically focus on two key strategic areas in our efforts to capitalize on the flexibility provided by the 5R permissions of OER: choosing a dynamic platform for OER delivery to students and expanding on existing meta-tagging to facilitate personalized learning options for teachers and students.

 


Speakers
AM

Ann-Marie Mapes

Education Technology Consultant, Michigan Department of Education/TRIG
JR

Jared Robinson

Manager, Office of Educator Talent/MDE


Thursday November 3, 2016 10:45am - 11:10am
B11

10:45am

Is the price right? A pilot evaluation of open vs traditional textbooks on student performance'†
Publishers are increasingly recommending the use of online learning materials, citing the positive impact of active learning systems on student performance (Pearson, 2015). At the same time, the ever-increasing cost of textbooks pose a financial burden for students, with some researchers hypothesizing that the high price of course materials may result in students opting to not purchase the text and being under-prepared for the course or taking fewer classes per semester, both resulting in a delay to graduation (Florida Virtual Campus, 2012). Current research suggests that open textbooks may improve student performance or, at worst, not adversely impact performance when compared traditional publisher materials (Fischer, Hilton, Robinson, & Wiley 2015). The aim of this study was to determine whether student performance would differ when using traditional publisher materials compared to open educational resources. Student performance, as measured by a common multiple-choice exams, was not statistically significant across courses. Midterm student feedback slightly favored the use of open resources.

Speakers
avatar for Veronica Howard

Veronica Howard

Assistant Professor, University of Alaska Anchorage


Thursday November 3, 2016 10:45am - 11:10am
B12

10:45am

OER Learning Pathway Application
Open Educational Resources (OERs) are poised to take the education world by storm! With the vast array of technology at our fingertips, figuring out how to actually harness and implement OERs in the classroom has become educators' latest challenge. Every lesson, assessment, activity, and project that we have developed for our classrooms can openly be shared with educators and students around the world. As we embrace our roles as educational pioneers, programs built with OERs will pave the way for education to become a world restricted only by the imagination. But we're not there yet!



To reach these aspirations, an easy-to-use vetting tool coupled with an OER Learning Pathway Application is vital in curating appropriate resources, organizing and personalizing Learning Pathways, and assessing student performance. Key features allow teachers to access vetted, pre-established Learning Pathways mapped at the skill/objective level, customize them for their classes needs and assign that content easily to students. Teachers can open a vetted Learning Pathway, search for related resources and remix the materials to supplement their personalized Playlists with new resources. Teachers may also submit their customized playlist both to the OER community and to the vetting organization for verification and conversion into a Learning Pathway.



From a student perspective, the OER Player couples an engaging interface which delivers identified resources and teacher direction at transitional points within each Playlist. Objective based assessments are part of each Learning Path so that teachers can check progress and performance so that this formative insight data can drive daily classroom activities. The OER Learning Pathway Application also serves as a bridge between the classroom teacher and the US Department of Education's Learning Repository.



The purpose of this presentation is to introduce participants to the OER Learning Pathway Application being developed as a joint venture by the Enlarged City School District of Middletown in New York, Education Elements, and Spider Learning, Inc. Through the use of this application, educators will have the ability to design, modify, and repurpose Learning Paths that serve up content to students by functioning as carousels of vetted skills based resources coupled with custom content and assessments.



Truly Open Educational Resources (OERs) meet the five R's of copyright and fair use law. The OER Learning Pathway Application facilitates each of these requirements, by allowing educators the ability to retain, reuse, revise, remix, and redistribute personalized Playlists in perpetuity. This tool is designed to support teachers by providing curated Learning Pathways composed of vetted OERs, along with the ability to customize them into student-facing Playlists. The OER Learning Pathway Application serves as a solution to the challenge of effectively implementing OERs in every classroom.


Speakers

Thursday November 3, 2016 10:45am - 11:10am
B14

10:45am

Putting Knowledge to Work with HigherEd.org: A New Educational Portal and Search Engine Using OER in Competency-Based Education
Knowledge to Work (K2W) is a U.S. Department of Labor TAACCCT grant project at Lord Fairfax Community College (LFCC) in Virginia. K2W has developed seven regionally-accredited direct assessment competency-based education degree and certificate programs using personalized learning plans, prior learning assessments, and free and low-cost learning resources (including OER) tied to competencies. In addition to implementing these programs at LFCC, K2W has made this work freely available online at the domain HigherEd.org for learners anywhere to benefit from. This presentation will provide an overview and demonstration of HigherEd.org and its uses for adult learners.

HigherEd.org is an educational portal and search engine designed to assist adult learners with achieving their career goals. HigherEd.org allows learners to create their own personalized learning plans based on their career goals, review competency frameworks associated with the credential(s) they will need in order to achieve those goals, and locate a variety of free and low-cost learning materials (including OER) to help them obtain those competencies. Users are also provided access to career pathway information, assessments, badges, nationally-recognized industry certifications, and tools for locating apprenticeship and employment opportunities. HigherEd.org also connects users with LinkedIn to market the competencies and credentials they have obtained to potential employers.

Speakers
avatar for Kiri Dali

Kiri Dali

Digital Librarian, Knowledge to Work, Lord Fairfax Community College
I am the Digital Librarian for a round 4 TAACCCT grant project called Knowledge to Work (K2W) at Lord Fairfax Community College in Virginia (USA). K2W is a direct-assessment competency-based education program using OER as learning materials wherever possible, and free or low-cost learning materials where relevant OER cannot be located. I assist faculty members with locating digital learning materials tied to the competencies they are teaching. We... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 10:45am - 11:10am
B13

10:45am

Case studies: Creating successful OER institutional initiatives with big impact
Are there tried-and-true best practices to make a big impact in OER at your institution? Absolutely! Nicole Finkbeiner of Rice University's OpenStax will cover the key components partner schools utilized to increase the number of students impacted by OER by 490% in one year. Kat Flies of Central New Mexico Community College and Adam Croom of University of Oklahoma will then discuss the specifics of their OER initiatives, including how they motivated faculty to use OER, how they received support from senior administration, and how they successfully impacted thousands of their students in a short amount of time.


Thursday November 3, 2016 10:45am - 11:35am
B17

10:45am

Floating in a Sea of Data: Why Higher Ed Needs #SoNAR
Narrative is an everyday social practice with important research implications. Narrative research captures the ways people and organizations make sense of the complex material and social environments in which their lives and experiences unfold.

In a time when big data, analytics, and evidence-based practices dominate educational policy and practice, narrative research offers an important alternative framework from which to approach what it means to know and learn. Narrative research approaches knowledge as always- situated in a given perspective; rather than claiming objectivity, narrative research investigates many given perspectives in depth, framing their intersections.

Social, networked and narrative research practices are not new and have been used traditionally in psychology, sociology, and other academic domains that focus on complex social dimensions that underpin all human functioning.

Narrative researchers help organizational decision-makers sense and respond to trends and zeitgeist changes within the workplace and broader society.

In open education and open pedagogy, narrative research investigates the seemingly universaland all-encompassing discourse of open, examining how some stories are valued over others and the hiding of assumptions and hegemonies at work in the field. Narratives help us to keep the human at the center of our research, embodied beings that are often disembodied by large-scale research now in the spotlight of an evidence/accountability movement in education.

Narratives also reveal cultures and contexts often less visible through positivist methods of analysis. "How individuals recount their histories--what they emphasize and omit, their stance as protagonists or victims, the relationship the story establishes between teller and audience-- all shape what individuals can claim of their own lives. Personal stories are not merely a way of telling someone (or oneself) about one's life; they are the means by which identities may be fashioned." (Rosenwald & Ochberg, 1992b, p. 1).

Emerging discourse research, especially when computational linguistics are involved, assists to provide a nuanced mixed methods approach to understanding a large corpus of text and/or narrative.

This panel will look at narrative as a principle of open pedagogy that challenges the idea of resource as a fixed thing. Using examples from existing courses and R&D projects, we will examine feedback models that take into account the dispositional, resilient, open and emergent aspects of learning. We will address the ways social narrative as an open pedagogy is linked to social narrative as a research method.

There are some emerging challenges facing researchers as we seek to apply narrative insights more openly and consistently to higher education. What do we mean by narrative? Whose narratives are heard and valued? Who is overlooked? When is it most useful to use narrative in research? What quantitative and qualitative relationships exist for narrative research?

These challenges are intensifying as institutions turn to big data projects to understand and reshape learning. Our aim in developing the Social and Narrative Research (SoNAR) network is to address these questions directly and to expand capacity for researchers to collaborate across institutions on developing open and robust narrative models for higher education research.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Collier

Amy Collier

Associate Provost for Digital Learning, Middlebury College
GS

George Siemens

University of Texas Arlington, Link Lab
avatar for Bonnie Stewart

Bonnie Stewart

University of Prince Edward Island
Bonnie Stewart is a writer, educator, and researcher fascinated by who we are when we're online. She explores the intersections of knowledge and technologies in her work, taking up networks, institutions and identity in contemporary higher education. Published in Salon.com, The Guardian UK, and Inside Higher Ed, as well as peer-reviewed academic venues, Bonnie has advised educational projects and programs in Sweden, the UK, the US, and Canada... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 10:45am - 11:35am
B16

11:10am

Is Your Institution Ready for OER? SUNY's OER Institutional Readiness Process
Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives are underway on multiple campuses across SUNY and are already saving students hundreds of thousands of dollars, while enabling faculty to rethink, innovate, and create. The State University of New York Faculty Advisory Council on Teaching and Technology (FACT2) organized a task group composed of faculty, instructional designers, librarians, and students, to propose a systematic and complete framework for SUNY campuses to assess their readiness to develop and/or curate, implement, support, scale up, and sustain OER.



Based on an existing Institutional Readiness process developed to achieve excellence in online teaching and learning, the OER Institutional Readiness process is designed to build capacity and sustainability both on individual SUNY campuses and system-wide. It will be driven by measurable outcomes based on mission and goals.



In the process of working toward our goals and outcomes we had to address issues ranging from the technical challenges of making curated OER easily available to faculty to strategies for changing campus cultures based on traditional textbooks and learning materials. OER is not just about saving students money, it is also about empowering faculty to create, use, and reuse learning materials optimally, flexibly, and creatively.



The Task Group Charge was:



Standardize a definition of OER



Engage the SUNY community and other OER experts to determine the necessary elements for a successful campus-wide OER implementation.



Use the Open SUNY Institutional Readiness Process as a model to adapt for assisting campuses to build their own capability to implement a successful OER initiative.



Create a potential set of tools that would be helpful to campuses for implementation of OER (consider the tools used in the Open SUNY Institutional Readiness Process as a starting point).



Determine where there would be benefits for benchmarking and sharing best practices between campuses to advance the development and implementation of OER across the SUNY system.



Guide SUNY campuses in using OER to improve the academic quality of educational offerings



Our Outcomes/Deliverables Were:



1--The Ensuring Success in the OER Implementation Process Rubric



7 categories 28 Indicators

Institutional Support of OER

Technology Support of OER

OER Integration into Course Development & Instructional Design

OER Course Delivery

Supporting Faculty in the use of OER

Supporting Students in the use of OER

Evaluation and Assessment of OER initiative



2 -- A Three Step Self Assessment Process



This process allows you to explore the benefits your campus can experience from implementing OER. A successful OER implementation requires a strategy that includes addressing the following criteria: financial and human resource commitment from campus leadership; infrastructure and support; accessibility; sustainability; and copyright and licensing. The provided rubric, process, and assessment tools will help you identify the resources you already have and what you may need to move forward with OER.



Overview of Process & Campus Commitment & Expectations (1-2 hours virtual or on campus)

Self-Assessment (facilitated, - day on campus)

Implementation Planning (facilitated,1/2 day on campus or virtual)



3 --A recommended set of tools to be used in the process:



Scoring forms

Gap analysis template

Best practices template

Implementation Plan template

List of Support Resources across SUNY

Speakers
TD

Tony DeFranco

SUNY, Tompkins Cortland Community College
MM

Mark McBride

SUNY, Monroe Community College


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:10am - 11:35am
B18

11:10am

Quantitative and Qualitative Evidence on the Efficacy of Lumen Learning's Waymaker Platform
This presentation by a faculty member and student will provide both qualitative and quantitative evidence on whether Lumen Learning's Next Generation Waymaker platform leads to better student outcomes, in terms of engagement and learning, than commercial texts for the courses.

The Waymaker platform was released in beta in August 2016 and pilot-tested at a variety of universities across the country for four courses over the 2015-2016 academic year. The courses were Introduction to Business, Principles of Marketing, Principles of Macroeconomics and Principles of Microeconomics. We participated in the pilot test, as student and instructor in using the platform while taking/teaching the two principles of economics courses at the University of Mary Washington.

Waymaker is more than a digital text. Modified from the OpenStax Principles of Economics text, Waymaker includes video, animations and simulations, which are particularly helpful in learning analytic subjects like economics. Waymaker also includes several aspects of personalized learning, based on a mastery-learning approach.

Waymaker is more than a source of course content. It is designed to promote metacognition by the students, as well as to provide actionable intelligence about student learning to both the student and the instructor.

Students begin each module with a formative assessment to identify what content they already know, and therefore where they should efficiently put their learning effort-namely, the content they do not know. As students progress through the content, they take a series of short formative quizzes. If they do not achieve mastery on a quiz, Waymaker suggests they review the content before attempting the quiz again. At the end of the module, students take a module quiz, which is summative but weighted very little. Again, if they fail to achieve mastery, they are encouraged to study again before redoing the module quiz. The philosophy is that assessments are activities to support the learning activities; they are not simply or primarily about grades.

The instructor receives reports from the module quizzes whenever a student fails to achieve mastery. This allows the instructor to reach out to offer help and encouragement to students who are struggling. We used the Waymaker platform in online courses where often it is difficult for the instructor to know how students are faring. The Waymaker reports allow instructors to efficiently allocate their time to the students that need it.

In this presentation, we will

1. Briefly demonstrate the Waymaker platform;
2. Present our personal perspectives (student & instructor) on how the platform worked;
3. Present survey results of student perceptions from the two classes; and
4. Present results of a statistical analysis comparing student outcomes on the final exam compared to outcomes obtained using commercial textbooks.

We will end with time for Q&A with the audience.

Speakers
SG

Steven Greenlaw

Professor, University of Mary Washington


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:10am - 11:35am
B11

11:10am

Open, but not for criticism
It is postulated there would be "little scientific advance" without individuals who are open-minded to assimilating new discoveries whilst discarding their prior beliefs and practices (Kuhn 1970). Underpinning the advancement of any subject is the ability of the individual to think and reflect critically, and as part of a self-regulating research community, we engage in the critical appraisal of the work of others in return for feedback on our own endeavors. This is not without difficulty and it is recognized we rarely negatively cite the work of others (Ball 2015), or publish negative results (Peplow 2014).

We are further subject to critical debate which would be confined to traditional academic activities such as question sessions at conferences or 'letters to editor' exchanges. Today, as traditional methods converge with our digital working environments, our activities become painted with emotional and social pressures, and the term critical "Öengagement' better describes our experience (Wohlwend & Lewis 2011).

This paper explores the nature of critical engagement of research communities within their digital spaces. A literature review will be conduced using a systematic approach to identifying research articles within a defined area of open education. A range of peer-reviewed and other scholarly articles such as blog posts will be used to assess the nature of the critical debate. The articles will be examined to identify the locations of where social interactions take place, e.g. blog comments, letters to editors? A further detailed analysis will explore the nature of research practices themselves, from the quality of methodology, biases within data published and cited, and self-awareness of the limitations and reproducibility of the studies by the author. A framework will be drawn up based on the meta-research approaches derived from Ioannidis et al (2015).

This paper will provide insight into critical engagement within the open education research community. This work will provide us with insight into our working practices that might call for us to open our minds to more critical debate.

References

Ball, P. (2015). Science papers rarely cited in negative ways. Nature News.

Ioannidis, J. P., Fanelli, D., Dunne, D. D., & Goodman, S. N. (2015). Meta-research: evaluation and improvement of research methods and practices. PLoS Biol, 13(10), e1002264.

Kuhn, T. (1970). Scientific Revolutions (2nd. ed., Enlarged), Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Peplow, M. (2014). Social sciences suffer from severe publication bias. Nature, August.

Wohlwend, K., & Lewis, C. (2011). Critical literacy, critical engagement, digital technology: Convergence and embodiment in glocal spheres. In D. Lapp, & D. Fisher (Eds.), The handbook on teaching English and Language Arts. (3rd ed.). New York: Taylor & Francis.

Speakers
avatar for Vivien Rolfe

Vivien Rolfe

Lecturer, University of the West of England
Sharing open educational resources to support life sciences education. Like to animate physiological processes. Saxophoning. Dog walking. Jellied Eels.


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:10am - 11:35am
B12

11:10am

Next Generation Learning: Are Faculty and Administrators Prepared?
It's time to push the boundaries of what open education and OER can do. Making education more accessible and affordable is only the beginning.



The traditional one-size-fits-all education model is evolving. OER has the power to revolutionize it, but simply digitizing traditional content isn't enough. Students deserve engaging, personalized learning experiences that prepare them to be successful in the future. Next Generation Learning provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to increase student engagement, outcomes, and retention; better prepare students to be successful in today's workplace; and reduce cost for institutions and for students. But, what is Next Generation Learning exactly? And, how can it be incorporated into the classroom?



Come and learn about Next Gen Learning and how it can take OER to the next level. Open education opened the door to modernize education. It's now time to explore where that door leads.

Speakers
avatar for Joshua Moe

Joshua Moe

Founder/CEO, Odigia
Josh brings over 15 years of experience leading technology design and development teams for small, medium & large organizations. Josh spent over 4 years working in Boston’s higher-ed IT space, where his passion for education technology helped him identify opportunities to improve it with user-centric design principles. When he’s not manning the helm @Odigia, you can usually find him outdoors trailblazing in his Jeep, hanging from a cliff... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:10am - 11:35am
B14

11:10am

A little bird told me... Using social media for promotion and community building
A tweet might just be 140 characters but it can mobilize a political revolution. A Facebook post written in Cambridge, Massachusetts can inspire a retired farmer in Auckland, New Zealand to study linear algebra. More people are beginning to look to the internet to continue their education and expand their subject expertise. In a time where people are choosing to gather news and current affairs from sources on social media, integrating these channels into your organization's communications strategy has never been more important.

In this session, we will share our experience in growing a following, promoting MIT OpenCourseWare, and fostering an online community of individuals who become essential ambassadors for disseminating our work. We will provide practical tips for why and how you can promote your organization, lessons learned in experimenting with campaigns, and touch upon quantitative and qualitative reporting.

Attendees will leave this session with a better understanding of how social media efforts can make a difference in an organization's reach and impact as well as serve as a powerful tool in communicating the value of your open educational resource.

Speakers
avatar for Yvonne Ng

Yvonne Ng

External Outreach and Annual Giving Manager, MIT OpenCourseWare
Marketing, social media, fundraising, and stewardship.
CS

Cheryl Siegel

Publication Manager, MIT OpenCourseWare


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:10am - 11:35am
B13

11:35am

How to utilize research to create a case for an OER initiative
How do you convince your institution, state, etc. to support an Open Education Initiative? John Hilton of Brigham Young University will cover the efficacy research of student success including grades, test scores, completion, and retention. Nicole Finkbeiner from Rice University's OpenStax will then cover student savings metrics, testimonials, and strategies on how to utilize the data to effectively advocate senior administrators, faculty and others for institutional support and a dedicated Open Education Initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Finkbeiner

Nicole Finkbeiner

Associate Director, Institutional Relations, Rice University's OpenStax
Nicole is the Associate Director of Institutional Relations, focused on developing and managing the relationships with faculty adopters and administrators. A graduate of Kellogg Community College, Western Michigan University and Michigan State University, she worked in college relations for community colleges prior to joining OpenStax College. When not promoting Open Education Resources, Nicole fills her time attending lectures, spending time... Read More →
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B17

11:35am

The Content Paradox: The Open Ethos in the Abyss of Access
The Open movement has enjoyed unprecedented mainstream successes over the past several years, such as the United States Department of Education's #GoOpen campaign, the UNESCO Open Education Resource platform, and more popular references to free or low-cost textbooks by celebrities such as Kanye West. Such successes are indicative of the resiliency of the movement, but a growing conflation of openness and access or even openness as textbooks hinders further growth of a movement founded in creation and development for social justice (Worth, 2015). Now that the licensing arguments for OER are more widely accepted, the space of Open in further discourse and the success of further OER development and policies requires a larger scope from which Open cannot be viewed as omnibenevolent or just.

Building upon a growing body of critical research (Bayne, 2015; Moe, 2015a; Moe, 2015b), this paper identifies the fallacies in the Open definition where Open is stratified on a copyright spectrum. Taking Wiley's rethinking of his Reusability Paradox and subsequent escape hatch (Wiley, 2015), the paper uses critical theory and the philosophical work of poststructuralist Roland Barthes (1980) to identify a subsequent content paradox: "When we open the escape hatch from the reusability paradox and let the content out into a world unencumbered by copyright, we leave the safety of discussing open as a copyright problem and enter into a larger and more problematic space where open cannot be a use-value product nor a universal value. By opening the escape hatch and leaving the reusability paradox, we make open less absolute than when the hatch was closed" (Moe, 2015b).

The Open community must face the reality of Open in a sociocultural setting much larger than its genesis of 13 years ago, where warranted criticism will go beyond the contention of Open as an absolute to the contention that there are contexts where it is plain wrong (Worth, 2015). Moreover, unwarranted or debatable criticisms will go much further. By engaging recent literature pushing back on the universality of openness, this paper identifies that for openness to continue to grow as a movement rather than a political arm for materials production, the adoption of open as a principle must engage both users and creators on a personal and transformative level rather than bureaucratized and passive. The ease of conversations about copyright, if continuing as the pre-eminent manner to discuss Open, will render the OER movement conflated into textbooks, unable to realize further gains in process, implementation and ideology. The struggles of the Open concept in a space greater than copyright offer opportunity if we allow ourselves to embrace the paradoxes inherent in the movement.

Speakers
avatar for Rolin Moe

Rolin Moe

Director of Educational Technology & Media, Seattle Pacific University
truth is not capitalized =)


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B12

11:35am

Scaling up OER Publishing with a Networked Approach
This presentation will outline development of long-term sustainability and operations plans for an open access textbooks and OER publishing program. The first stage in Open SUNY Textbooks' (OST) development was initially funded by grant money and participating library contributions towards author and peer review incentives and copy editing services. The primary output were open access textbooks.

In the second phase of development, OST (based at SUNY Geneseo), along with the system-level SUNY Academic Technology (ATIS) office and partner SUNY libraries, are developing a scaled-up, networked approach to digital learning and publishing development within the system, using curated OER content, course supports, editorial services, and instructional technology development and design, based on a new funding model. The presenters will discuss the partnerships under way in SUNY; the developing collaborations with Lumen Learning; and share strategies for developing business models to fund open educational resources and publishing.

The guiding vision for is this plan is to empower campuses across the SUNY system to provide OER adoption and support by:

Improving OER scale-up by providing insight on potential service models.

Evaluating the impact of cost structures and pricing on all constituents.

Advocating for increased awareness of OER and benefits to students and faculty.

We will offer:

Flexible models for participation that allow customized participation at different levels of cost.

A facilitated framework for assessing campus readiness for OER success that includes a rubric, process, and assessment tools.

A mentorship network that includes professional development to build OER expertise across campuses.

Copy editing, peer review, and open and modular publishing platform.

Grant funding for implementation and professional development incentives.




Speakers
MM

Mark McBride

SUNY, Monroe Community College
avatar for Kate Pitcher

Kate Pitcher

Library Director, SUNY Geneseo and Open SUNY Textbooks
Kate Pitcher is Head of Technical Services & Collection Development at the State University of New York (SUNY) College at Geneseo, where she is also a member of the library’s publishing team and chair of the scholarly communications team. At SUNY Geneseo, she worked in reference, instruction, government documents and as Web Development Librarian before her appointment as Head of Technical Services. Technical Services is a seven person... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B18

11:35am

Video-based Copyleft OERs for Teachers: Lessons Learned
Abstract:
Experiences & realizations from designing, producing, & sharing CC-BY-SA video-based, interactive online short courses for K-12 teachers.

More information:
Earlier this year, we developed and shared customizable, modularized, online "short courses" that are designed to help elementary and secondary teachers learn to plan curriculum-based lessons, projects, and units that incorporate educational technologies in effective ways. (See: http://activitytypes.wm.edu/shortcourse/.) As we designed and developed these courses, we planned to offer the materials to the larger teacher education community as OERs. In so doing, we worked to anticipate the needs of a wide range of teachers with varied experience, working in differing contexts and cultures, as much as possible. Framing our work in this expansive way brought much unanticipated learning, which we hope to share with interested OpenEd16 participants.

The content of the courses is divided into brief, sequential modules that help teachers to build their professional knowledge while learning to design technologically enriched instruction. Each module begins with an overview and learning goal for the segment, and is presented as video-based content that includes narrated slides, interviews with practicing teachers, imagery, and additional online resources. Each of the videos ranges from 2-13 minutes in length, and includes verbatim closed captioning. In addition to the video segments, the modules also offer editable student learning guides that scaffold each step of the learning, and regular prompts for realtime or asynchronous discussion with colleagues and mentors. The modules can be used as supplements to face-to-face courses or as a completely online learning experience that would span approximately 2-3 weeks. We have created different versions of the short course for elementary and secondary preservice and inservice teachers so that we could customize the examples included to maximize relevance for the learners.

We consciously created the materials to be perhaps too prescriptive and detailed for more experienced and/or advanced learners, since we suspected that it would be easier for users to remove some of the material than to have to create additional supports. We acknowledge, however, that despite our efforts to create content and structure in the short courses that could be used productively in many different teacher learning programs, providing options for other teacher educators to freely customize, amend, and remix the modules and supporting materials offers the most flexibility for using these materials. Therefore, we offer the course materials in three forms, providing instructors with maximal options for addressing their students' professional learning needs.

1. The courses can be used "as-is" through open Web sites.

2. Users can also download a learning management package file to import into a number of different learning management systems, such as Blackboard and Canvas. Once imported, users can modify the content, prompts and materials.

3. For those who would prefer more customization options, we also offer all of the course components for download, including video files, PowerPoint slides, and Microsoft Word document versions of the scripts and student materials. These can be modified, remixed, and used in any digital learning format.

We hope that our efforts will catalyze more widespread sharing and adaptation of professional learning OERs among teacher educators.

Speakers
avatar for Judi Harris

Judi Harris

Professor and Pavey Family Chair in Educational Technology, College of William & Mary
I work as a professor, coordinating the doctoral program in Curriculum and Educational Technology (CET), in the School of Education at the College of William & Mary in Virginia. My research and development focus upon technology integration in K-12 curricula, and the TPACK (technological pedagogical content knowledge) construct in particular (see: http://tpack.org/). Previously, my work focused upon learning activity structures used in designing... Read More →



Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B16

11:35am

Student learning gains after replacing traditional textbook with open source instructor-created website readings and videos
Biological Principles (BIOL 1510) at Georgia Tech is required course for many science and engineering majors and is typically taught in a 200+ seat flipped lecture format. Until this Fall 2015, students were required to purchase a textbook and subscription to an on-line homework system, Mastering Biology. In Fall 2015, a team of three faculty replaced the textbook with an open source collection of instructor-created written content and instructor-curated video materials. We also replaced the on-line homework system with instructor-written questions delivered to students outside of class in Learning Catalytics. In-class activities remained the same, where students submitted Learning Catalytics responses while working with informal student groups in class. Here we report the results of a comparison of student learning gains between Fall 2015 and Fall 2014, with a traditional textbook, using student learning metrics of comparable test questions, homework questions, and in-class activity questions, as well as student perceptions of their learning from participant surveys.

Speakers
avatar for Chrissy Spencer

Chrissy Spencer

Biological Sciences Faculty, Georgia Tech


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B11

11:35am

Creative Commons Open Business Models
In the summer of 2015 Creative Commons ran a successful Kickstarter campaign raising funds to write a book about open business models made using Creative Commons. With the help of backers, and through an open public call, Creative Commons identified businesses and organizations from around the world and across all sectors who have successful Creative Commons based open business models. From that list twenty four were chosen to interview, profile, and analyse.



This session will report out on the results of this work. The twenty four businesses and organizations will be identified and highlights of their stories and models shared. Analysis showing how these models work and how they generate economic and social value will be summarized. The differences between open business model success and those of traditional models where success is defined solely in monetary terms will be portrayed. Commonalities and unique innovations across models will be described along with the evolving strategies these organizations are pursuing to sustain their work.



This session aims to provide participants with a framework for thinking about about open business models and the sustainability of open education initiatives. By drawing on a wide range of models from within and outside education participants will be given a spectrum of possibilities and strategies that can be adopted to fit their own initiative and/or spark new, innovative ideas. Participants will be provided with tools they can use to design their own model.



This session will conclude with a look at how Creative Commons open business models fit within a larger open context that includes open source software, open hardware, open access, open data, and the sharing economy. The implications and possibilities associated with free, open and abundant goods generated by a network will be contrasted with a system of monopolies, banks and governments trying to keep things private, scarce and commercial. Participants will leave with an understanding of how to survive with a foot in both worlds while working toward a more open and equitable future.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B14

11:35am

Investigating Foreign Language Open Education in the US
Much of the open education movement to date has centered on the creation and use of open educational resources (OER) in areas such as science and technology, which are on the leading edge and currently the more prominent users of OER. Connexions, Merlot, and OER Commons show two to three times as many entries for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics categories as compared to the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

While other contexts (e.g., Europe) have created and made use of OER in foreign language (FL) curricula since the early 2000s, OER only recently began to affect FL education in the United States (US). A small-scale study that surveyed university-level FL program directors in the US indicated that one of the primary reasons for interest in OER as the growing number of blended and fully online courses offered in a variety of languages (Thoms & Thoms, 2014). However, discussions of how OER can be best utilized in both traditional face-to-face, blended, and fully online FL courses have not sufficiently addressed the issue of effectively mixing open and closed materials, tools, and practices (Blyth, 2013). Furthermore, little is known about how FL educators teaching in K-12 contexts in the US perceive and make use of OER in their courses.

As the open education movement continues to grow, there is a critical need for research that explores (a) how FL educators perceive and make use of OER in their classrooms, and (b) the nature of and reasons for the rise in open educational practices (OEP). In response to the paucity of research related to OER and OEP in FL education in the US, this presentation reports on the results of the first wide-scale survey study sponsored in part by the Center for Open Educational Resources and Language Learning (COERLL) housed at UT-Austin. Data was collected in summer 2015 from 1,673 FL educators collectively teaching over 20 FLs and working at all levels of the US educational system-K-12, community colleges, and 4-year colleges/universities. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the response data focus on (a) how aware FL educators are of OER and open education in general, (b) reasons why FL educators adopt OER/OEP, (c) perceived benefits and challenges of creating and incorporating OER in FL courses, and (d) how OER has changed FL educators' teaching. The presentation will report on this data and will provide suggestions for raising awareness among FL educators about OER and OEP. In addition, future avenues of research in this area will be delineated.

Speakers
JT

Joshua Thoms

Utah State University


Thursday November 3, 2016 11:35am - 12:00pm
B13

12:00pm

Lunch
Thursday November 3, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Grand Ballroom

1:15pm

Different Aspects of the Emerging OER Discipline
The more recent interpretation of open education is related to open education resources (OER), open education practice (OEP), and open access publishing. Although related to the original, distance education based interpretation, there is a distinct community around these areas. The inception of the OER movement can be used as the basis for open education movement, which dates it back to 2001. Although still relatively young, this is a sufficient timeframe for different sub-communities to develop with a range of priorities and interests. Using a content analysis of the OER Knowledge Cloud repository, this presentation will examine the emerging sub-cultures within open education practice. Ten types of research article are identified and these represent different approaches and issues for the groups involved.


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B12

1:15pm

A Synthesis of OER Efficacy and Perceptions Research: 2015-2016
In this presentation we will synthesize all of the efficacy and perceptions OER studies that have been published in 2015-2016. This will include the research of the Open Education Group as well as other research initiatives. Specifically, we will categorize and critique the different studies. We will discuss gaps in the literature and suggest future research initiatives that will strengthen our understanding of efficacy and perceptions of OER.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B11

1:15pm

Essential learning model (ELM ) transformation in Pratice
The presentation description is currently being reviewed for permission to release prior to its announcement on the campus. We had hoped to have that done before the deadline tonight, unfortunately it will probably take until early next week. We hope this is okay, but if not we understand.

Speakers
PS

Peter Smith

University of Maryland University College (UMUC)


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B13

1:15pm

An Open Ed Tech Collaborative for Creating Open Ed Tech Infrastructure
We believe that tools, environments, and processes are as integral to open practice as the sharing of open content, or the development of policies. Yet due to the complexity and expense of developing and supporting rich open online environments, too often this element stands as a barrier to effective action. The British Columbia Open Ed Tech Collaborative (http://bcopened.org/) is dedicated to supporting a broad community while implementing specific strategies. This work has taken place in the context of the global "indie ed tech" community, and it is hoped that this session will deepen the connection between that community and the practitioners of OER.

In this panel presentation and discussion that includes different members of the the BC Open Ed Tech Collaborative, we will briefly outline the purpose of the Collaborative, its principles and processes. We will demonstrate a Docker-based hosting environment that allows for collaborative, multi-institutional management of WordPress that allows for organizational and individual differentiation. We also outline a collaborative arrangement that allows participants to rapidly deploy a wide range of open source tools via a locally-hosted sandstorm.io application market. We are working towards a service that enables non-technical end users to install and run software downloaded from an audited app store, installed with one click - much like installing apps on Google Play or iTunes. Each app runs in a secure "containerized" environment, where it cannot interfere with other apps without permission. It also ensures that corrupted applications do not disturb the operation of others. This approach allows for rapid prototyping and experimentation, while reducing the risks associated with them.

The ability to easily share, or "clone" pre-configured and ready-to-use learning apps across courses, or organizations, offers immense potential benefits. In a sense, it would allow educators to share ready-to-use online learning tools the way we now share OER. It could also allow us to share our OER already packaged with a technology wrapper that is optimized for the learning resources. In addition to sharing our progress to this point, this session hopes to engage #OpenEd16 attendees in a discussion on how best to optimize this capacity for the open educational community, addressing challenges familiar to the early adopters of OER: how best to share? How do we ensure these approaches achieve their potential to enhance the experience of learning?

Speakers
avatar for Brad Payne

Brad Payne

Technical Analyst, BCcampus
Brad Payne is currently the lead developer for the Open Textbook Project whose work focuses on open source software using PHP (LAMP). When not contributing to other developers’ projects on github, he builds his own and invites participation. Through exploiting API’s and with a penchant for design patterns, he helps BCcampus implement new technologies for post-secondary institutions. Prior to his current position at BCcampus, Brad worked in IT... Read More →
avatar for Novak Rogic

Novak Rogic

Web Strategy Manager, CTLT - UBC
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rogic


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:15pm - 2:05pm
Grand Ballroom

1:15pm

Roadway to Success: The Intersection of Guided Pathways and Z-Degrees
Lansing Community College is a Guided Pathways school, as such, it has created clear Program of Study (degree) maps that define the courses students take, and the order in which they are taken. The goal of Guided Pathways is to increase timely completion of degrees while focusing on the educational needs that best match the students' goals. Another main initiatives at Lansing Community College is Operation 100% in which the goal "is nothing less than 100% completion for the students in degree, certificate, and/or transfer pathways." Through the adoption and successful use of OER and Open Materials both the Operation 100% initiative and Guided Pathways can be strengthened as the research shows that students who use OER are able to complete more coursework since there is no cost for course materials. Therefore, creating Z-degrees within Guided Pathways is a way the presenters believe Lansing Community College will be able to support their students needs best. This session focuses on the collaboration between the Guided Pathways Coordinator, the OER Project Manager, the Operation 100% Faculty Project Manager, full-time and adjunct faculty in advocating for the implementation of sustainable Z-degrees within Guided Pathways. Both the challenges associated with the beginning stages of creating Z-degrees and strategies to overcome these will be addressed. The presenters of this session envision Guided Pathway Z-degrees to be able to rapidly take off at their institution and therefore make Lansing Community College a national leader in this area.

Speakers
CC

Christine Conner

Guided Pathways Coordinator, Lansing Community College
MK

Mark Kelland

Professor, Lansing Community College


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:15pm - 2:05pm
B18

1:40pm

Free + Freedom: The Role of Open Pedagogy in the Open Education Movement
What if faculty co-constructed their course syllabi with their students, allowing them more control over learning outcomes, policies, required readings, assignments, and even grading? What if students were encouraged to engage in public scholarship and tasked with producing or refining open resources for the commons? And what if universities collaboratively developed their courses with radical transparency? Would rethinking education in this fashion prompt students, faculty, and administrators to recoil in fear or give in to territoriality? Or are there ways that open pedagogy can contribute to a new and relevant vision for education, one built on an ethos of sharing?

Post-secondary institutions frequently claim to be student-centered; however, they are often hard-pressed to offer any truly compelling ways in which their students (not faculty, course content, accreditation or testing requirements, or budgetary concerns) actually drive the learning process. Open education advocates routinely describe OER as "beyond free"; however, faculty who reuse, redistribute, and retain OER (themselves a minority) vastly outnumber those who revise and remix OER (let alone those few who involve their students in the process). Taken together this begs the question of whether "student-centered" and "permissions" are just soothing ideas or marketing ploys that are rarely implemented? In other words, are we are merely paying lip service to the pedagogical potential of open?

At OpenEd15, spirited conversations began about the role of open pedagogy in the OER community and the question of whether "free" is truly a gateway to "freedom." This presentation considers how "open" can manifest a learner-driven educational philosophy and how its practice can enhance our classrooms, our courses, and even our advocacy. We will offer a broad definition of "open pedagogy," explore it in practice (including providing specific examples from a range of academic fields and levels), and then raise questions about the potential benefits and pitfalls of widening the focus of open education advocacy and scholarship from open textbooks and cost-savings to include pedagogy and the value of the open license. Embedded in this presentation is our belief that the power of "open" is being underutilized, and that we as advocates should be thinking more broadly about access and more ambitiously about how the big tent of "open" can contribute to a critically needed, sustainable, and aspirational vision for education by and for the public.

Speakers
avatar for Robin DeRosa

Robin DeRosa

Program Director, Interdisciplinary Studies, Plymouth State University
Interested in Open Pedagogy, interdisciplinarity, and learner-centered futures for public higher education. Find me on Twitter @actualham.
avatar for Rajiv Jhangiani

Rajiv Jhangiani

Open Studies Teaching Fellow & Psychology Professor, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
I am the Open Studies Teaching Fellow and a Psychology Professor at Kwantlen Polytechnic University in Vancouver, BC, where I conduct research in open education and the scholarship of teaching and learning. I also serve as an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group, an Associate Editor of Psychology Learning and Teaching, and a faculty workshop facilitator with the Open Textbook Network. I have revised two open textbooks—for... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B16

1:40pm

Exploring the Remix Hypothesis
Open educational resources may hold significant promise for contributing to the kind of progress that genuinely improves higher education. While breathless pronouncements of "Ödisruptive innovations' seem to accompany the predicted demise of universities, a relatively small group of advocates, researchers, and practitioners have been working on projects that seem to have actually made a difference.

Bliss et al., (2013) suggest that there are four primary categories of effects from OER use, including cost, outcomes, use, and perceptions. These four categories, which form the acronym COUP may be useful in identifying specific, measurable benefits of OER."Â

The 5R permissions, (retain, reuse, revise, remix, redistribute) may provide opportunity for faculty to teach with OER differently than they might with commercially produced resources. In a blog post in March 2015, David Wiley introduced the idea of the Remix Hypothesis, which states that "changes in students outcomes occurring in conjunction with OER adoption correlate positively with faculty remixing activities."

Wiley suggests that OER adoptions will roughly fall into three categories of remix activity: replace, realign, and rethink. Faculty who simply replace commercial resources with OER may do so for the financial benefit to their students, but without changing their courses in any other meaningful way, leading to very limited or no gains in learning outcomes. Those who realign will identify OER which align with their current learning outcomes in order to better support learning, leading to modest positive improvements in learning outcomes. Finally, those who rethink their courses will remix their resources but will take the additional step of remixing the learning activities and assessments, leveraging the 5R permissions of OER to change what students are required to do in order to attain the intended learning outcomes. Wiley refers to the rethink level of remixing activities as 'open pedagogies'.

This presentation will describe a study undertaken to explore Wiley's remix hypothesis by investigating how the use of OER influences both learning outcomes and perceptions of OER using data from a survey of faculty at Thompson Rivers University who have adopted a textbook from the BCcampus open textbook repository. Slightly modified versions of the survey were also sent to students in these courses, administrators, and instructional designers. The study explored how open textbooks, open platforms, and open pedagogies influence the ways in which faculty and students use OER to enhance learning outcomes.

This study was supported by the Open Education Group through an Open Education Research Fellowship.

Speakers
avatar for Colin Madland

Colin Madland

Director, Online Shenanigans, Trinity Western University


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B11

1:40pm

Open Educational Resources as Public Goods
How should governments and educational authorities such as universities ensure the provision of educational material such as textbooks? Using the logic of public goods theory I argue the that best access regime for educational materials is not the default copyright regime but when resources are licensed open for re-use by anyone. Since educational materials are neither scarce nor consumed by use, and using digital technologies they may be almost costless reproduced and shared the most economically efficient use is when educations resources are unrestricted. Public goods theory suggest that governments can either use tax generated revenue to pay for a public good or offer exclusive control over a good, for example through copyright.



Current systems for government procurement of educational resources impose costs, prevent teachers and students from getting resources that they need and it prevent them from using those resources that they get in some ways that would be useful for teaching and learning. They also hinder innovation. Although public monies are expended neither government nor public acquire any lasting asset.



Public procurement policy should treat educational resources as public capital goods rather than private consumable goods. Where textbooks are bulk purchased with funds from the public purse the procurement process can be restructured to require that the textbooks are licensed under an appropriate open licence. This will not require increased levels of funding since the change will free the components of the consolidated value chain increasing competition. The resulting open educational resources will constitute intellectual infrastructure on which competitors are free to innovate.



When educational resources are made open that harnesses the self organizing power of the market. Innovation by competitors and innovation by users both follow because the transaction costs inhibiting innovation are reduced to close to zero. If the move to open educational institutions is not made now, the effects of the technological change will be that control over educational resources is even more concentrated in the hands of technology vendors or publishers, or more likely an amalgamation of technology vendor and publisher.

Speakers
AR

Andrew Rens

SJD, Duke University Law School


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B14

1:40pm

#TateGate: A Case Study in the Ethics of Open
The presentation analyzes #TateGate, the controversy around web-enabled annotation platforms such as Genius and Hypothes.is, as a case study of the ethics of open. Bloggers can moderate, delete, or forbid comments. Should they be able to do the same with annotations? What if the notes are abusive, or more like graffiti than reasoned commentary? Can the open web also be a safe space? Should it be? Hypothes.is, a popular annotation platform for web documents, says its mission is ""To enable a conversation over the world's knowledge."" What happens when conversation turns to argument? What happens when argument becomes hate speech? What happens when argument descends to catcalls and abuse? Yet what are the consequences of trying to protect and regulate speech on the open web, for any reason? Most of all, how does the possibility of unregulated and unmanageable commentary mean for educational practices such as blogging on the open web?



This session raises far more questions than it supplies answers. By examining the complexities of this question, however, and drawing analogies ranging from the Glossa Ordinaria and the Geneva Bible to Trump Chalking, and by including specific examples from the use of hypothes.is in teaching and learning, this session seeks to provoke and catalyze deeper learning and more searching, poignant modes of thought in both attendees and speakers. Come wrestle with some of the fundamental contradictions? paradoxes? riddles? tragedies? of the human condition, as revealed by a new World Wide Web affordance. (And yes, part of the session will be available ahead of time so attendees may annotate the document in real time as a semi-permanent backchannel, a new phenomenon in computer-mediated communication.



If you like "wicked problems," and if you have a mind for recursion, this is the session you won't want to miss.

Speakers
GC

Gardner Campbell

Special Assistant to the Provost and Associate Professor of English, Virginia Commonwealth University


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B12

1:40pm

Excelsior's Open OWL: engaging students and improving basic writing skills
Excelsior's multimedia Online Writing Lab (OWL), developed in partnership with eight community colleges across the nation, applies best practices in instructional design and education technology to provide students with a truly immersive user experience. Two pilot studies found the OWL to be effective in improving student writing and increasing course grades. Designed so that it can be easily incorporated into any traditional, online or blended courses at no cost, the OWL offers an alternative to developmental writing courses.

We recently launched a rebuilt version of the OWL. I'm going to open the hood of the new OWL and tell the story of the platform's creation. Highlights:

  • Cost of the original OWL platform? $250,000... Cost of the new one? $0.
  • Owlets - a feature that lets you customize the OWL for your courses.
  • The free HTML5 authoring tool we used to create interactive activities.

Speakers
avatar for Mark D. Oppenneer

Mark D. Oppenneer

Director of Web Systems, Excelsior College


Thursday November 3, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B13

2:15pm

Making Open Special
Mountain Heights Academy, formerly Open High School of Utah, has learned a lot over the past 8 years in operation. Through failures and successes our faculty have elevated their open pedagogy and practice to best serve the needs of their students. Special education students benefit greatly from openness. General ed teachers can adapt and tier open content to meet student needs. Special ed teachers have access to a wealth of open educational resources to remix to customize lessons for their students. Open pedagogy + open practice + special ed students = winning. The best practices discovered for SpED also make the general ed courses better as well.

Speakers
avatar for DeLaina Tonks

DeLaina Tonks

Director, Mountain Heights Academy
I am the Director of Mountain Heights Academy (formerly the Open High School of Utah), an online public charter school committed to building and sharing OER curricula.


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B16

2:15pm

Designing OER for Reuse: Tips from an Instructional Designer and Instructor
While there seems to be increasing acceptance by individual faculty and institutions of open practices and open resources, there are still many considerations and challenges for course developers who wish to use OER in a course, as well as create OER for reuse by others. There are several factors that should be considered at the design and development stages as faculty experiment with OER use and reuse. The manner in which OER are designed and presented involves many critical considerations and decisions on the part of the development team, including the instructional designer, subject matter experts, media team and Production personnel.



As part of my job as an instructional designer at Thompson Rivers University Open Learning in Kamloops, BC, I was the pedagogical coach and project manager of a major revision of a popular first-year English course, ENG 1101: Introduction to University Writing. After having worked previously on two OERu projects (ART 100: Art Appreciation and Techniques and PSYC 2111: Introduction to Research Methods in Psychology), with fellow open champions such as Dr. Irwin Devries, Dr. Rajiv Jhangiani and Dr. Frahd Dastur, I was successful in "selling" the idea of using an open text and other OER to a campus faculty who was hired as the subject matter expert for the project. We decided to make the course as "open" as possible and also create some OER ourselves as supplementary resources to the open BC Campus text we adopted.



This presentation focuses on some of the challenges we encountered and lessons we learned in our attempt to be OER adopters, adapters and creators e.g. designing OER in such a way that they can be easily mixed and matched by others at a later date to suit their individual needs, fitting OER creation into a traditional workload job structure, and changing our thinking about the way we use learning materials as educators.


Speakers
avatar for Gail Morong

Gail Morong

Instructional designer, Thompson Rivers University
Gail has been an educator for over 33 years with experience in learning design, curriculum development and delivery, distance education and online learning, open educational resources, undergraduate and graduate collaborative program design, educational technology and educational leadership.


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B11

2:15pm

The Open Learning Initiative at 15: Successes, Lessons Learned and the Road Ahead for OLI.
Founded at Carnegie Mellon University with funding from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Open Learning Initiative is a now fifteen-year-old open educational research project. Leveraging CMU's traditional strengths in technology, the learning sciences and cross-disciplinary collaborations, OLI was initially conceived as a science-based exploration of how the affordances of technology and lessons from learning science can be leveraged to demonstrably enact instruction for learners. Designed to simultaneously improve learning and facilitate learning research, OLI courseware has been widely recognized for Its role in supporting students and instructors, and for it's success in discovering and improving approaches to engineering learning. Since that founding, the use and creation of OER has been more than a simple element in the OLI approach; open has been foundational in OLI's mission and principles, and is essential part of OLI's vision for research, community and the continuous improvement of courses.



This session will reflect on these first 15 years, providing an overview of OLI's history, with a high level look at the OLI's approach, results and key successes; the session will also consider failures and lessons learned. Key themes in this retrospective include: specific challenges of open in higher education; economics and sustainability; discoveries; community development; and supporting tools and technologies. A key focus: the "ÖO' in OLI. How fully has OLI participated in and lived up to open education's vision and ideals? What has been the result of the interplay between OLI's open and scientific agendas?



After considering OLI's history, the session will then look ahead, discussing OLI's current state and projects and longer-term strategic goals and future plans. Key to these plans are contributions to the tools, technologies and infrastructure that will support the next generation of open education; a continued, thoughtful participation in open education; a more forceful leadership role at the intersection between OER, data and analytics; strong push in realizing OER potential to improve outcomes through continuous improvement; the ongoing role of open education in driving and benefiting from scientific discovery.



The remainder of the session will solicit reactions from the audience on lessons learned, future plans and points of intersection with trends and participants in open education.


Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B14

2:15pm

Creating a Culture of Open at Northern Virginia Community College
Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) has built a large and robust nationally recognized OER program and is the first community college to openly share a full OER degree pathway in partnership with Lumen Learning. NOVA's award-winning zELI initiative currently offers two online OER Associate Degree pathways. A third OER Degree pathway at NOVA is currently being developed on-campus with support from the VCCS Zx23 project.

In order to establish a culture of openness to support sustainable growth of OER at one of the largest and most diverse institutions in the nation, key faculty and staff had to blaze the trail of accepting open education as a professional responsibility. NOVA's comprehensive OER program was built by pioneering faculty and staff, with resources and support from a vibrant OER community, but it hasn't been all rainbows and unicorns.

During this session a panel of NOVA administrators, faculty members, instructional designers, and a college librarian will discuss their roles in introducing OER into a broad college curriculum. We will give an overview of the challenges we faced, mistakes that were made, and the lessons we learned. We will talk openly about issues of college communication, cross-campus collaboration, technology infrastructure, and competing priorities. We will take a candid look at what was necessary to get us to where we are today and suggest ways to resolve these and other potential challenges, both internally and with the help of key external partners.

Finally, we will share the process that we developed and implemented to integrate OER into NOVA's institutional culture. We will invite participants to make use of our open degree pathway available on Lumen Learning's Candela platform, and provide a roadmap that offers suggestions for introducing, implementing, and expanding OER initiatives at virtually any institution.

Speakers
avatar for Preston Davis

Preston Davis

Director, Instructional Service, NOVA
I have worked in higher education for 20 years… as faculty, administrator, and consultant. As Director of Instructional Services at NOVA, I oversee the online learning and educational technology services, manage instructional training and certification, and lead the OER initiative. I also find time to teach a philosophy course on occasion. | I earned BS and MA degrees from Old Dominion University, and a doctorate from The George... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:15pm - 3:05pm
B17

2:15pm

Open Education in Virginia's Higher Education Institutions: an environmental scan
What is the status of open education initiatives at Virginia two- and four-year institutions? Is infrastructure in place to support faculty who are interested in course redesign using open educational resources (OER)? Are there common obstacles that impede or prohibit OER adoption?



The State Council of Higher Education in Virginia (SCHEV) wanted to find out more about these and other issues affecting the introduction and growth of open education at member institutions. Consequently, SCHEV's Open Virginia Advisory Committee (OVAC) developed and distributed a survey to members in January 2016. Seventeen institutions were initially contacted, with response data currently being collected and evaluated. Here are some preliminary results.



Interest in OER is pervasive, although the stage of institutional programs varies widely, with the Virginia Community College System serving as a model for 4-year institutions. As the predominant learning management systems used, Blackboard and Canvas allow faculty to share learning materials seamlessly at their institutions. Moreover, instructional design support is readily available to faculty who are integrating OER into their courses.



Nevertheless, the lack of 1) policies addressing OER, 2) demonstrable high-level administrative support, and 3) integration into institutional strategic plans are examples of the greatest challenges to institution-wide, not to mention state-wide, movement toward real growth in open resources to replace expensive learning materials. The detailed findings of the OVAC survey of two- and four-year institutions in Virginia will be presented during this talk, as will legislation affecting open education that has been introduced in the Virginia Assembly. Representatives of two- and four-year institutions will share their perspectives and answer questions.


Speakers
avatar for Preston Davis

Preston Davis

Director, Instructional Service, NOVA
I have worked in higher education for 20 years… as faculty, administrator, and consultant. As Director of Instructional Services at NOVA, I oversee the online learning and educational technology services, manage instructional training and certification, and lead the OER initiative. I also find time to teach a philosophy course on occasion. | I earned BS and MA degrees from Old Dominion University, and a doctorate from The George... Read More →
avatar for Claudia Holland

Claudia Holland

Head, Scholarly Communicaton and Copyright, George Mason University
Claudia C. Holland is Head of Scholarly Communication and Copyright in the Mason Publishing Group, George Mason University Libraries. She leads the libraries’ scholarly communication initiatives and educational outreach, and has served as the University’s Copyright Officer since 2008. As part of her work, she administers Mason’s Open Access Publishing Fund, dedicated to assisting faculty and students with publishing in open access... Read More →


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:15pm - 3:05pm
B18

2:15pm

The OER Degree Initiative
In the early 21st century, the nation is struggling to address numerous social and economic challenges. We are witnessing a shrinking middle class, increased income disparities, lack of opportunity for young people, and the need to build a skilled workforce to attract good jobs, increase regional economic development, and ensure prosperity for all. Americans fervently believe that education is the route to opportunity, social mobility, and to rebuilding our diminished middle class. As never before, our society demands high-access, low-cost opportunities to get the knowledge and skills required for good jobs that pay a family-sustaining wage. Leaders at all levels are looking to community colleges to help solve these complex challenges. Our community colleges are the nation's premiere open-access institutions that educate the largest percentages of low-income students and students of color in higher education. They are trusted institutions where America develops the skills of its workforce and millions of nontraditional college students gain traction toward college degrees and credentials and sustainable careers.

Yet completion rates for students attending community colleges remain stubbornly low. Many factors are thought to contribute to these low rates including financial pressures on community college students, many of whom are already supporting young families. Institutional factors are also believed responsible, including outdated pedagogy and curriculum, weak advising systems, and inadequate supports for learning.

The Open Educational Resources (OER) Degree Initiative seeks to boost college access and completion, particularly for underserved students, by engaging faculty in the redesign of courses and degree programs through the replacement of proprietary textbooks with open educational resources. The short term goal is to reduce costs for students and accelerate their progress through college, but an important secondary impact is to change the culture of institutions so that they create systems and structures that better connects curriculum and pedagogy to updated student learning outcomes.

The new initiative builds off groundbreaking work in several states and particularly at Tidewater Community College in Virginia. Tidewater is the first community college to adopt an open educational resources degree which enables students to complete a two-year degree in business administration with no textbook costs. Tidewater's "Z-Degree" program has experienced high student satisfaction levels, improved student retention, and an estimated 25 percent reduction in college costs for students (tuition and books).

Over the next three years, the Open Educational Resources Degree Initiative will lay the groundwork for nationwide adoption of OER Degrees. Recognizing the growing expertise and interest in developing OER degrees beyond US borders, the Open Educational Resources Degree Initiative invites two-year public higher education institutions and systems in the U.S. and Canada to apply for three-year grants to support the creation of new OER Degree programs.

The work of selected colleges and state systems will be supported by a robust technical assistance component that will help faculty and staff re-design courses using open educational resources; opportunities to engage in a community of practice with OER experts, peers, and other resources; and research and evaluation efforts.

Speakers
UD

Una Daly

Open Education Consortium
DD

Donna Desrochers

Associate, rpk GROUP
RG

Rebecca Griffiths

Senior Researcher, SRI Education
RS

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Initiative, Achieving the Dream, Inc.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:15pm - 3:05pm
Grand Ballroom

2:40pm

Open Practice as a Tool for Educational Change
Often institutions focus on textbook cost and saving money for students as a reason to invest in open education. Opportunity and access are important missions, and OER help us to meet those missions by focusing on the value of saving students money. This very necessary part of OER initiatives causes many of us to focus on the adoption of OER- because the more adoptions we can pursue the greater cost savings to students. However, OER is about more than saving students money. Open education initiatives should also focus on intrinsic motivations toward education such as interest in classes and high-value learning experiences. Open practices are the key toward moving the institutional conversation beyond savings and adoptions to scaled and sustainable growth of pedagogies that value openness above the access to education. After all, access isn't the true goal of educational institutions; our goal is to graduates who think critically and engage responsibly with our communities and world. Open education should be bigger than saving students money so that they can afford to take more classes. Open education initiatives, at their best, should focus on the rights of open access, open licensing, and open practices to encourage the best learning experiences for a variety of students.

At Pierce College our efforts focus heavily on adoptions, but greater emphasis is being made on open practices that encourage leadership, faculty, and students to focus on the power of openness as a way of practicing education. This presentation will discuss the philosophy of open practices and how to grow them into the opportunity to improve institutional goals through focusing on the core principles of openness and institutional interest in improved student achievement.

Speakers
avatar for Quill West

Quill West

OE Project Manager, Pierce College


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B16

2:40pm

Khan Academy in Chinese: A Case Study in OER Revision
Khan Academy videos have 700,000,000+ views in English. The website "Netease" has used the CC-BY-NC-SA license to create Chinese Khan Academy videos. This represents an outstanding example of revision of open materials. Over 100 courses and 2,000 specific videos have been translated into Chinese. As stated on the Khan Academy website, "NetEase is the first portal site in China to partner with Khan Academy to localize its content and this greatly enhances NetEase Open Courses' content and user base. Meanwhile, the cooperation with NetEase will promote the localization of Khan Academy courses in China, to achieve the purpose of providing a world class education for anyone anywhere" (https://www.khanacademy.org/about/blog/post/29838569844/netease-subtitles-videos-in-chinese).



This research study will quantify the impact of the revison of the Khan academy videos by exploring (1) the number of times these videos have been watched, (2) classifying which courses have been of greatest interest to viewers, (3) user habits in watching Khan Academy vides (4) comparing the number of views of dubbed videos with subtitled videos, and so forth. We frequently hear that "people don't take advantage of the 5Rs - this study shows that this is not true.

Speakers
AR

Allen Rao

Global Business Director, Netease


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B11

2:40pm

Open Education as a Real Utopia
The proliferation of educational resources, practices, and policies across the globe is presenting a promising array of potentials for change in education. Yet, Cronin's (2016) intriguing prompt for the OER16 conference keynote, "If open is the answer, then what is the question?" highlights the rather uncertain ambitions and ambiguous principles that permeate the movement. Propelled by the material possibilities of the Internet, the networks that flow through it, and the liberation of intellectual property through open licensing, open education has been focused on exploration of the possible to the neglect of a theoretical or ethical grounding. Indeed, Wiley (2015) too has recently argued for a deepening of engagements with notions of care and sharing in open education to ground open practice beyond mere rules or directions.

For instance, in North America the focus of the open education movement lies squarely upon the provision of open textbooks. This development is a well-warranted response to an educational context rife with exceedingly expensive educational materials. It is a powerful approach to embedding open principles in education by highlighting the alignment to "access" and "affordability" that dominate in North American educational policy discourse. However, this focus limits broader understandings of open education such as open research, open pedagogies, and other open educational practices. Further, the focus on open textbooks shies away from an explicit engagement with political and theoretical underpinnings of "open" and as such limits exploration of the emancipatory potentials of open education.

In this paper, I lay out a framework that balances theoretical and ethical formulations with an eye towards practical implementations. In development for over 20 years, Wright's (2010) framework of "real utopias" is an approach to constructing "a normative theory of the possible" (2012, p. 2). Following Wright, the paper is laid out in four parts. First, referencing Farrow's (2016) nascent development of an ethics for open education, I review a set of moral principles by which we can judge existing educational institutions. Second, I mobilize those principles as an analytic for diagnosis of problems and critique of practices in education. Third, I explore how open can be applied as a viable alternative to the problems exposed. Finally, I conclude with some reflection on how "real utopias" can offer a grounded theory of what is possible in open education.



References:

Cronin, C. (2016, April 18). If open is the answer, Then what is the question? Keynote address for the OER16 conference. Edinburgh, UK.

Farrow, R. (2016). A framework for the ethics of open education. Open Praxis, 8(2). Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpr axis.8.2.291

Wright, E. O. (2010). Envisioning real utopias. London, UK: Verso.

Wright, E. O. (2012). Transforming capitalism through real utopias. American Sociological Review, 78(1), 1-25. doi: 10.1177/0003122412468882

Wiley, D. (2015, January 15). The deeper ethics of education and open: Generosity, care, and relationships [Web log]. Retrieved from http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/3732






Speakers
avatar for Jamison Miller

Jamison Miller

PhD Candidate, The College of William and Mary
I am a doctoral candidate and early-career researcher in open education theory, policy, and practice.


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B12

2:40pm

Connecting Open Courses to Tuition-free College Credit
As part of its "Direct Credit" program, Saylor Academy has 22 courses recommended for 64 credits, with guaranteed acceptance by 16 partner schools and another 40+ schools accepting some credit. under the American Council on Education's "Alternative Credit Project". University partners have forged additional programs using their own in-house quality review processes that recognize dozens of additional Saylor Academy courses for credit. In 2016 alone, students will save hundreds of thousands of tuition dollars toward starting - and, perhaps more importantly, completing - their degrees.



While the world wondered aloud about the elusiveness of college credit for MOOCs and learned about several high-profile (and laudable) public-private partnerships that connect specific employers with specific universities, Saylor Academy has quietly been connecting informal open learning opportunities to formal degree programs without regard for where the students live or who they work for.



In this presentation, we will discuss several initiatives that share the common thread of earning college credit for open courses, bypassing barriers of cost, geography, and time. Specifically, we will tell of our Saylor Direct Credit program, which sees our OER-rich courses put under rigorous external reviews, improved by educators working with Saylor Academy, and redeployed for credit-seeking and recreational learners alike; we will tell of our work with the University of Memphis, whose faculty independently vetted and approved Saylor Academy courses to support degree completion for students whose financial situations had delayed graduation indefinitely; we will tell of our partnership with City Vision University and Qualifi to offer a $5,000 bachelor's degree; we will tell of our founding participation in the Alternative Credit Project, to which we have contributed 14 OER-based courses with guaranteed transfer to dozens of schools.



Together, these programs have so far saved students hundreds of thousands of dollars in tuition. Students whose graduation dates were indefinitely postponed due to financial hardship have since earned their degrees thanks to tuition-free courses made possible by open educational resources.



When open courses comprised of open resources are vetted and recommended for college credit, everybody wins - partner schools, formal and informal students, the public, and HEIs more generally. The programs that we have piloted can readily be replicated by additional colleges and universities for a low implementation cost and a strong reward in terms of student retention and completion rates. The work put into Saylor Academy open courses as a result of quality reviews pays dividends to the open community through our open-licensed syllabi, learning outcomes, and both curated and original content.

Speakers
avatar for Sean Connor

Sean Connor

Director of Community Relations, Saylor Academy
Open online courses; LMS; marketing; business & institutional use cases for OER; community management; libraries; edtech; equity; college affordability; alternative credit options; alternative credentials.
avatar for Devon Ritter

Devon Ritter

Director of Education, Saylor Academy


Thursday November 3, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B14
 
Friday, November 4
 

8:30am

Keynote: Sara Goldrick-Rab
Friday November 4, 2016 8:30am - 9:15am
Grand Ballroom

9:15am

Keynote: TJ Bliss
Friday November 4, 2016 9:15am - 10:00am
Grand Ballroom

10:00am

Break
Friday November 4, 2016 10:00am - 10:30am
TBA

10:30am

Advancing OER policy through Open Government Partnership
Open Government Partnership (OGP) is an international organization promoting multilateral initiative that seeks to make government more open, effective, and accountable. In OGP, governments of member countries adopt strong commitments (developed in cooperation with the civil society) that adhere to the organization's core principles: government transparency, accountability, citizen participation and technology innovation. Historically, countries have focused strongly on open data but several countries, most notably USA and Slovakia, have also used the OGP as avenue for open education advocacy. In late 2015, governments of over two thirds of the 69 participating OGP countries endorsed the Joint Declaration on Open Government for the Implementation of United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This declaration commits participating governments to take advantage of the OGP infrastructure - including the National Action Plan and the guaranteed participation of Civil Society - to help achieve the United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals. Because education is a key part of the agenda, this created a great opportunity for furthering open education policies through OGP in many new countries. The presentation will discuss the latest developments in the area and show specific ways how the conference participants can get involved in the OGP process.

Speakers
avatar for Nicole Allen

Nicole Allen

Hi! I'm Nicole Allen, Director of Open Education for SPARC and part of the Organizing Committee of OpenCon 2016. My day job is leading SPARC's work on Open Education, including advocating for U.S. federal and state policy, supporting on-campus efforts to advance OER through academic libraries, and international advocacy for open education through the Open Government Partnership. I also help out with organizing OpenCon by coordinating the application and review process, and logistics for attendees. I've been working to advance open education since I graduated university about ten years ago (even before), and have a background in grassroots organizing and policy advocacy.

, SPARC
https://static.sched.org/a10/2885121/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?c1e
avatar for Jan Gondol

Jan Gondol

Open Government Advisor, SPARC
PhD in Library and Information Science, caring deeply about open source, open data and open education. Worked & consulted for the Government of Slovakia on the Open Government Partnership.


Friday November 4, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B17

10:30am

Benefits and Challenges of Adopting Open Textbooks in a K-12 School
This presentation will report on the benefits and challenges faced by a K-12 school implementing open textbooks. This case study focuses on a large K-12 public school located in the Midwestern part of the United States with an enrollment of over 18,000 students. The open textbook initiative began during the 2015-2016 school year with the adoption of open science textbooks in 6th through 9th grades. These open textbooks have been curated by district curriculum coordinators and teachers. Middle school students may access these open textbooks though computer labs, mobile computer carts and their own mobile device or a device provided by the school district as part of a 1:1 initiative. They may also use a printed copy provided by the school district.

Much research has been conducted on the money saving aspects and outcomes of using open textbooks for students in higher education environments. In K-12 environments however, the research, especially in the form of case studies that may inform administrators venturing in the OER space is very limited. With continual budget concerns of K-12 schools and the rise of expectations, cost saving benefits may help schools increase academic success with less funding.

As with many new innovations being introduced in the classroom there are often logistical issues that need to be addressed to facilitate successful implementation. For example, one consideration that needs to be addresses with the use of open textbooks is the availability of mobile devices on which to allow access to all students. While some students have their own mobile devices to use, other students may not. K-12 schools must consider how students will access their required open textbooks while they are at both school and home.

Evidence of open textbooks use in K-12 environments is emerging. For example, the CK-12 foundation, the largest U.S. publisher of open textbooks used all over the world include public, private, and charter schools on six of the seven continents. Goals of these schools using open textbooks include: creating and acquiring digital content, digital devices, and maintaining the devices with a relatively static budget, providing high-quality and current instructional material using no new textbook resources, and addressing instructional needs not being addressed by current textbooks. This presentation considers the attainment of these goals through an open textbook initiative at one K-12 school and their plans for the continued development and use of open textbooks in other content areas.


Speakers

Friday November 4, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B13

10:30am

Big Data, Little Data: A story behind the numbers
The low completion and certification rates in MOOCs lead some to question the learning effectiveness of these new learning environments. However, current reports show that the number of people who sign up for these courses has risen from an estimated 16-18 million to over 35 million users in 2015 compared to the previous year. This growth is also evident in the number of MOOCs offered, the breadth of topics covered in these new learning settings, and the number of universities collaborating to offer MOOCs across the globe. This is indicative of the fact that users see value in these learning environments that may be hard to detect using a single measure of completion or certification. Consequently, our research team has begun to explore available Canvas MOOC data in order to discover latent patterns among its learners and course design features that can support new and effective forms of knowledge production and learning.

On March 1, 2016, Instructure, the creator of the Canvas learning management system and the Canvas Network MOOC platform, released a de-identified dataset from Canvas Network courses that were offered from January 2014 to September 2015. The data was queried, organized, and de-identified using a process similar to the one used for the HarvardX-MITx Person-Course data release of 2014, and then the data was made available to researchers on Harvard's Dataverse service. Instructure has opened access to this data to create opportunities for identifying and solving educational challenges in online learning. The dataset includes over 325,000 aggregate records, with each record representing one individual's activity in one of 238 Canvas Network courses. The variables available in this dataset include administrative variables from the Canvas Network system or computed by the research team, as well as variables generated by the users either through their interaction with the course or collected through surveys.

In line with the call for the need for "better data" to help understand the experience of MOOC stakeholders that extends beyond the number of clicks users make as they interact with a MOOC platforms, our analysis includes contextually rich data in the form of qualitative course metadata, course review notes by MOOC designers, and instructors' end of course feedback on their experience with Canvas Network.

After reviewing the data set from Canvas Network, a single course from that larger set of courses was selected and comparisons of this course v. the larger dataset will be shared. The #HumanMOOC was selected for this review as the authors have worked together on the course and can share their stories from a quality review and course facilitation perspective.

This research is exploratory in nature. Hence, no formal a priori hypotheses have been formulated or tested. However, by exploring data from multiple sources, we hope to be able to formulate explanatory relationships that can be examined in future research efforts. During the session, we'll be sharing our initial insights gleaned from our effort at making sense of these diverse data sets as well as next steps and futureplans.

Speakers
avatar for Katie Bradford

Katie Bradford

Director, Platform and Partnerships Marketing, Instructure
As Director of Platform & Partnerships Marketing at Instructure, Katie’s role is to guide innovation and open education initiatives at Instructure. She works across multiple teams to implement new processes and ideological shifts, marketing initiatives, and product changes that will promote openness at Instructure. | | | In the past, Katie has worked with Canvas Network, Instructure’s open, online course platform, where Katie has... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B11

10:30am

OER Advocacy and Adoption in Utah Libraries
With the rapid expansion of OER, Libraries need to become intrinsically integrated into the open education movement. In the state of Utah the role of libraries advocating for and supporting OER adoption and application takes multiple forms. One advocacy project that embodies this shift in the attitudes of Libraries is the ILEAD (Innovative Librarians Explore, Apply and Discover) project "Utah OER". ILEAD is an initiative designed to help librarians understand and respond to user needs through the implementation of participatory technology tools. "Utah OER" is a cross-institution collaboration exploring librarians' unique authority to utilize their expertise with information literacy, academic support, and advocacy to promote the finding and use of open access academic materials through the "Utah OER" advocacy website and additional resources. At a higher level in Utah, the Utah Academic Libraries Consortium (UALC) is discussing the role of libraries in OER adoption and application. This consortia level of support for OER in Utah activates conversations considering Library roles of leadership and advocacy. As a member of UALC, Salt Lake Community College (SLCC) Libraries are examining their role with OER and the UALC initiatives around OER. The academic libraries in Utah have a variety of roles in implementing and assisting in the use of OER. Some libraries are on the vanguard of OER on their campus, others are merely supporting the larger work schools have already done. This presentation will examine these varying levels of roles libraries in Utah that have advocated and supported for OER adoption and application as well as address the pitfalls/barriers involved with such efforts.

Speakers
ZA

Zack Allred

Salt Lake Community College Libraries


Friday November 4, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B12

10:30am

The Future of Open and Online? Toward Peer-Led Collaborative Learning
One of the traditional models for peer learning involves a group of students gathering in the library or a coffee shop, pulling out their textbooks and class lecture notes, and helping each other consolidate their learning by looking up information in their books or notes and solving example problems (for math or science courses) together.

Today, in the age of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) and other open and online courses that enroll tens of thousands of students, it would be nice to have a way of fostering the same kind of small, intimate study groups that exist in this traditional peer learning model. But how can we do this?

At UC Irvine, we have been developing a prototype for a web application that combines all of these activities - content search, real-time communication, and collaborative problem solving - into one system centered on our large topically indexed OpenChem video lectures . The application associates OER video and textual explanations with problems, solutions and even simulations. It allows peer groups to manage online study groups, and meet virtually for collaborative study sessions.

Search:

Students enter a search term and the system returns links to all lecture videos in the OpenChem library that address that topic. The system simultaneously returns associated text from an open source, such as UC Davis' ChemWiki or an OpenStax textbook, as well as selected relevant practice problems on which the students can work together online.

Meet:

Students who wish to join study groups create accounts for themselves in the system. An advanced student who has been trained as a peer leader can then set up these groups and invite students to join. He/she can also use the system to initiate synchronous online study sessions that employ VOIP voice communications and a shared whiteboard for collaborative work.

Collaborate:

The students log into their accounts when their study session is scheduled to begin and access the online conferencing feature. The peer leader guides their study, perhaps by using the search function to find relevant videos and text, and the students can use the shared whiteboard capability to work on practice problems together.

One of the advantages of this system is that the content is carefully curated so students can find answers through video and associated text more quickly than they could by searching through class notes or textbooks. Because the content is curated, only relevant and useful information is returned from the searches, which makes more effective use of students' study time by reducing the time needed to find answers and increasing the time available for collaborative problem solving.

Our presentation will provide more details about this peer learning application as well as encourage discussion on ways to bring massive learning contexts down to a human scale.

Speakers
SS

Stefano Stefan

University of California, Irvine


Friday November 4, 2016 10:30am - 10:55am
B14

10:30am

Designing Effective Open Educational Practices and Policies at Community Colleges with the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER)

A key component in many successful community college adoption campaigns has been participating in communities of practice (CoP). Members of the CCCOER community of practice from across the US and Canada will share how participating in and leveraging the community activities supports their design of effective open educational practices and policies at their college.

Panelists:  

  • Quill West, Open Education Project Manager, Pierce College District, CCCOER Advisory board president.

  • Sue Tasjian, Jody Carson, Northern Essex Community College, co-leaders of the Massachusetts Community College Go Open project.

  • Regina Gong, OER Project Manager, Lansing Community College

  • Jason Pickavance, Director of Educational Initiatives at Salt Lake Community College

  • Alisa Cooper, Glendale Community College Faculty, co-chair of the Maricopa Millions OER project.

Educause’s definitive Communities of Practice Design Guide: A Step-by-Step Guide for Designing & Cultivating Communities of Practice in Higher Education (Cambridge, Kaplan, Suter, 2005) identified 4 key activities that support the identified purposes of a CoP:

  • Develop Relationships and Build Trust

  • Learn and Develop Practice

  • Carry Out Tasks and Projects

  • Create New Knowledge

Develop Relationships and Build Trust

CCCOER members build community through participating in an active online discussion forum where new information and activities related to open educational practice and policy are shared.  Members use this forum to get expert advice on finding and adopting OER, motivating faculty, involving students, and many other topics.   Both asynchronous and synchronous online meetings are scheduled monthly to further support interactions.

Learn and Develop Practice

Monthly webinars and advisory meetings feature OER thought leaders from within the community and outside.  These activities keep members tuned into new research findings, OER collaboration opportunities, and open education policy updates. Members are strongly encouraged to share their early project successes during online meetings and get feedback on various approaches. The CoP involves members in selecting specific topics for meetings and the annual member survey provides another vehicle to involve members in developing the focus for the CoP. Volunteering to serve on the executive team gives members experience in helping to build a CoP that reflects the diversity of its members.

All professional development webinars and other online meetings are recorded and provide ongoing artifacts for exchanging new knowledge.  A campus OER toolkit is being revised to reflect new and evolving understanding of open educational policies and practices.

Carry Out Projects and Create New Knowledge

CCCOER panel presentations and workshops are organized at regional and national conferences to provide an opportunity for members to work together in-person, promote their OER adoption successes, and share new knowledge with colleagues throughout higher education.  Panelists will describe how their participation in the CCCOER has informed and strengthened their local OER projects and helped them create and exchange knowledge with newcomers and experienced OER practitioners alike.

CCCOER works with over 250 colleges in 21 states and provinces to promote open educational practices and policies to expand access and to enhance teaching and learning at community colleges.


Speakers
UD

Una Daly

Open Education Consortium


Friday November 4, 2016 10:30am - 11:20am
B18

10:30am

Reading, Writing & Arithmetic Meet the 5Rs: Opening the Adult Education Classroom with Open Professional Development
Beyond providing no-cost and freely reusable content and resources for instruction, Open Educational Resources (OER) are beginning to shift teaching and learning practice in adult basic education. Historically, the focus on adult basic education has been on literacy and the basic math skills students need to attain a high school credential or its equivalent.



OER help to meet the high demand for quality instruction and increase the capacity of adult educators to teach more rigorous content, particularly in science and math. OER and other resources developed for K-12 and higher education are giving direction for standards implementation in adult education, which provides a connection to college for adult learners. As the use of OER ramps up in the adult basic education community, the future looks promising but it is not without challenges which need to be resolved through training and professional development.



In this presentation, staff from the American Institutes for Research will discuss their lessons learned providing practical training about OER and open educational practices in adult education to address the immediate need to engage the adult education field in the use of OER. Presenters will provide an overview of two open professional development solutions: (1) Teacher OER User Groups and (2) a three month training of trainers program - both funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education with the goal of supporting adult learners with development of 21st century skills to ensure students are college and career-ready. Presenters will also comment on their assessment of the use of these approaches as models for professional development on about how OER can be shared, reused, and adapted. Participants in this session will walk away with a better perspective on the applications for OER in adult basic education and how training can help to create a shift in thinking among adult educators about the value of teaching with OER and the use of technology to do so.

Speakers
DB

Delphinia Brown

American Institutes for Research
AD

Amanda Duffy

Senior Researcher, American Institutes for Research


Friday November 4, 2016 10:30am - 11:20am
B16

10:55am

Open Math Adoption in Elementary Schools: An Empirical Study
To date, very little research has been done K12 adoption on open education. We will focus on OER adoption in two school districts in the state of Washington. We compared 5,242 students who used EnagageNY Math with 6,552 students in comparable districts who used traditional curriculum. In a quasi-experimental study involving multiple regression analysis, we compared end-of-year test scores for these students. Even after controlling for socioeconomic factors, there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups.

Speakers
avatar for John Hilton

John Hilton

Professor, Brigham Young University
I began researching issues related to OER in 2008. I'm passionate about increasing OER research - especially research related to efficacy and student perceptions. See http://openedgroup.org/review.
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Friday November 4, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B13

10:55am

'All the words of wisdom sound the same' - open research in a closed world
The practice of citation started as a way of indicating whose shoulders we stood on - it now means big money as researchers use citation, journal impact and other "use measures" to land grants and jobs. The "open scholarly graph" is how we could describe the ideal situation where citations, the papers they referred to and other resources (such as datasets) are all open. In reality these relationships are owned and defined by a small number of commercial academic publishers, using opaque algorithms and often-incorrect data.



In this session I will attempt to explain the strange world of scholarly metrics, with reference (no pun intended) to legendary sources and citation from the world of research into open education. And I will touch on the strange and complex nature of "the citation" as artifact, relationship and metaphor, before offering some small steps towards a solution.



How good an academic are you? And is there any way we can tell other than by reading your work for ourselves?

Speakers
avatar for David Kernohan

David Kernohan

The Followers of the Apocalypse


Friday November 4, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B11

10:55am

But What About The College Store? The Impact of Textbook Affordability Projects
When academic librarians gather to share information about textbook affordability initiatives, the college bookstore position is invariably debated. That conversation is typically more about uncertainty than a concrete understanding of the relationship between the library, campus OER partners and the college bookstore. It is also the case that this relationship is shaped by the nature of the institution and how the college store is operated. Some of the frequently heard issues are;



- How will the college store react to a campus textbook affordability initiative

- Will the college store share information about textbooks and data on student textbook purchasing

- How will an affordability initiative impact the revenue a college store contributes to the institution

- Does it make a difference if the college store is run by the institution or outsourced to a for-profit retailer

- Can the college store be a partner in the OER initiative, and if so, what role can the bookstore play

- Why do some OER project leaders report productive relationships with college store managers while others report frustration and lack of progress.



The volume of questions with few answers suggests higher education needs to better understand what happens when an institution launches a textbook affordability project, and how that impacts the college store and its response. This presentation is based on a survey of academic libraries and college stores that have initiated some form of textbook affordability project that leverages OER and open textbooks.



The desired outcome of the survey research is to gain more information about what happens to the relationship between the library and the college store when the library is advocating for and leading a textbook affordability initiative. To what extent do academic librarians and college store managers demonstrate concerns about their relationship, and under what circumstances do textbook affordability initiatives encounter barriers because of opposition from a college store or owing to perceived concerns about how it will impact the store?



In addition to adding more clarity to our understanding of the relationship between the college store and other campus participants in a textbook affordability project, this presentation will offer some recommendations for best practices in bringing the college store into the project to facilitate a partnership, rather than raising the potential for conflict. In its "Learning Ecosystem" analysis The National Association for College Stores recommends in "deciding what's best, administrators, campus store leaders, IT, libraries, and faculty should work together to come up with a recommendation" for a learning content delivery model. This raises the prospect that the nature of the campus store is evolving from a past focus on selling textbooks to playing a larger role in the academic success of college students so that they are retained and persist to graduation.



A wise bookstore manager said that if students fail to persist and dropout, that's one less student to buy goods at the college store. We all have a common goal in retaining our students and helping them persist to graduation.


Speakers

Friday November 4, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B12

10:55am

Credits for MOOCs
Delft University of Technology started the Credit for MOOCs initiative to move the international recognizing of MOOCs forward. The alliance started with 7 universities: Rice University (US), University of British Columbia (Canada), EPFL in Lausanne (Switzerland), Delft University of Technology (Netherlands), University of Queensland and Australia National University (Australia). The alliance will extended with 3 more universities in the next couple of months.



The alliance starts with a 3 year pilot project in which each university offers around 10 MOOC for credits. Students of their own university and of the partner university can receive credit for the MOOCs. This can be seen as a virtual exchange program where not the students, but the exams travel. The first students can participate in January 2017.

The alliance is based on trust. If a university gives credit for a mooc for their own students, other should also give credit for it. For most of the MOOCs additional proctored assessment is necessary. The course team of the MOOC decided what additional assessment is necessary to give credit.



Within the alliance there is only transfer of credit, no money transfer. To make the transfer easier the alliance is setting up a coding system for the MOOCs: level, workload, type of assessment, etc.


Speakers
avatar for Willem van Valkenburg

Willem van Valkenburg

Boardmember Open Education Consortium, Delft University of Technology
Responsible for the production and delivery of all the Open, Online and Blended Courses of TU Delft. This includes OpenCourseWare, MOOCs, ProfEd, Online MSc and blended courses. | I'm also Board member of the Open Education Consortium.


Friday November 4, 2016 10:55am - 11:20am
B14

11:30am

SUNY Open Educational Resources: Improving Faculty Discovery and Adoption
During 2015-2016 eight campuses from the State University of New York (SUNY) collaborated on a SUNY Innovative Instruction Technology Grant (IITG) to trial a support model designed to allow librarians and instructional designers a framework with which to guide teaching faculty in accessing discovery tools through SUNY Affordable Learning Solutions, Lumen Learning while utilizing local talent in SUNY libraries and instructional design offices; modularizing and improving interoperability in the collection of existing Open SUNY textbooks; and embedding assessments in OER courses. The overarching goal of the service model was to:

- increase OER adoption
- improve OER alignment with course learning outcomes and
- increase student completion and success in OER courses

This model was tailored to take a specific next step forward for SUNY; by using the power and collective knowledge of established relationships on individual campuses, the aim was to further develop a systematic approach to SUNY's use and creation of OER.

In this presentation, teaching faculty, librarians and instructional support staff from Monroe Community College, Fulton-Montgomery Community College and Buffalo State College will discuss the first-year results of this model wrap-around service. Faculty will offer insights on the un/necessary presence and leveraging of OER-champions on their campus in fostering course-level and institutional changes. Librarians and instructional designers involved in the project will provide a ground-level view of how the service model operates on individual campuses and how collaborative partnerships with other SUNY campuses have developed. The course support teams that worked with faculty to adopt OER is a model that all campuses in SUNY are utilizing to scale OER using the Open SUNY Textbook as the SUNY OER Hub to build an OER community of practice in SUNY.

As a means of assessing both this service model for faculty and the impact of OER on student success, surveys were distributed to faculty and student participants during the Fall 2015 and Spring 2016 semesters. The results of those surveys indicated that:

- Students and faculty rated OER has being equal or better than publisher content

- Students overwhelming wanted printed versions of OER, but ranked the digital components of OER highly

- Faculty indicated the cost of course materials are a concern when selecting course content to teach from

In consideration of these findings and with the ending of IITG funding, the presenters will posit how this forward-thinking, success-orientated path potentially answers the challenges of sustaining and scaling this service model to positively impact SUNY's sixty-five campuses and 460,000 students.

Speakers

Friday November 4, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B18

11:30am

A Pilot's Eye View - from concept to roll out
In the last year the K12 OER Collaborative has spun out from incubation by The Learning Accelerator, to be a stand alone 501(c)(3) OER publisher. We have done extensive work on our brand and have established a style guide for the OER we are publishing. We have contracted with our partner Illustrative Mathematics to build a new middle school math curriculum to be licensed as CC BY OER. We have partnered with EL Education to deliver the next generation of their leading Engage New York Elementary ELA to market as part of our offerings. We have contracted with classroom teachers who have conducted thorough quality assurance with help from Student Achievement Partners (SAP), ACHIEVE and UnboundED. We have been working with University researchers led by Kenji Hakuta of Stanford University to imbed precise supports for English Language Learners (ELLs) and with national experts to assure accessibility for students with special needs. We are partnering with some of the most innovative purveyors of adult learning to assist school districts in their adoption of our OER. We are ready to go to market....except for one thing:



Full scale pilots in school districts whose student bodies disproportionately impacted by poverty, who have higher than the national average rate of students for whom English is a second language and whose district leadership is fully committed to giving those "disadvantaged" kids all of the advantages of a first class education to prepare them for college and careers that they can be proud of. Those pilots began as far back as July and are in full action mode today.



This presentation is an update on our progress as we prove out our theories regarding promotion of widespread adoption of the highest quality instructional materials in the marketplace to promote equity of access to the best opportunities a k-12 education can deliver.

Speakers
LS

Larry Singer

CEO, K12 OER Collaborative


Friday November 4, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B13

11:30am

Slaying GOBLINs: Gamification as Open Educational Practice
How do we slay the GOBLINs of traditional instruction and use open educational resources (OER) to instill new pedagogies? As we move beyond content delivery as the paradigm for education and the textbook as the posterchild for OER, can we reintroduce play and with it the motivations accompanying agency and personal growth into professional development and the classroom?

Games Offer Bold Learning Insights Nowadays (http://goblin.keeganslw.net) or GOBLIN is an open, interactive adventure game built as a vehicle to experientially teach and learn. GOBLIN combines professional development, storytelling, and a role-playing game into a faculty development opportunity for instructors at the University of Oklahoma.



Traditional approaches to gamification in education have relied on badges and extrinsic motivations. Instead, GOBLIN baked elements of gamification-including agency, personalized feedback, and collaboration-into the gameplay to engage participants in metacognitive reflection.



Taking a commercial approach to building a game or gamifying an entire class can be expensive and time consuming. GOBLIN consists of an in-person workshop, a table-top role playing game, a website, and a participant-curated collection of resources. By repurposing the public domain assets of an open source video game (https://www.glitchthegame.com/) and using open source tools, we developed the multi-modal components of GOBLIN in a free and replicable model. However, this was not without its challenges. For instance, the limited nature of open artwork meant that it was hard to present diversity (both in terms of gender and race) within our fantasy world.



The gamified GOBLIN workshops offered an experiential faculty development opportunity demonstrating the utility of play as motivation. Being in the GOBLIN game, allowed us as instructors to approach games in education from a critical perspective. Interaction within the workshop and our post-course study reflect strong faculty engagement. Twenty-one participants produced more than two hundred reflections, blog posts, and curated resources-all of which were optional assignments-and they have integrated gamification and open resources into their own courses (see http://goblin.keeganslw.net/participant-responses/).



In this presentation, we will present the gameplay and faculty experience of GOBLIN. Like GOBLIN, our presentation will use gamification to open a dialogue on the role of gamification and open pedagogy in professional development, instructional design, and the classroom. And of course, we need your help to defeat the GOBLIN!

Speakers
avatar for Keegan Long-Wheeler

Keegan Long-Wheeler

Educational Technologist, University of Oklahoma
Educational Technologist @TeachOU. Teacher of teachers. I'm intersted in ed tech, GBL, gamification, STEAM, OER, OpenPed, APIs & learning more! My favorite project at the moment is eXperience Play (http://xp.keeganslw.com), a professional development program where faculty design and produce text-based games while engaging in pedagogical concepts related to game design. | | Currently playing Life is Strange, & Star Wars Battlefront, and... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B16

11:30am

Make Open Education and OER Practical with Open Standards (LTI & Common Cartridge)
Taking advantage of OER and its potential benefits can take a lot of work. You have to learn it exists, find the right materials, adjust it for your context, make sure students know how to access it, keep it up to date, etc. With all that, many don't have time to learn and use Open Education pedagogical practices too.
I think we can lower the initial overhead to adopting both OER and open practices to the point where, for example, an adjunct hopping into a course the weekend before the semester begins would be able to use them.
We can achieve that using open standards like Common Cartridge and LTI. I'll show how you can easily import an editable course with built in renewable assignments and tools like Choral Explanations into an LMS. This allows teachers to start learning these open practices by actually doing them.

Speakers
avatar for Bracken Mosbacker

Bracken Mosbacker

Director of Development, Lumen Learning


Friday November 4, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B11

11:30am

LOUISiana OER Faculty Survey: Librarians opening doors
We know from the literature on open educational resources that faculty awareness and institutional support are two barriers to widespread adoption, addressing these issues through trusted library networks is one strategy to impact change. Libraries are natural partners as they are already positioned to support all areas of the curriculum in higher-education. They have expertise in the subject areas they support, such that they can identify, vet, and thereby reduce the sometimes overwhelming number of materials that faculty consider for course adoption. Libraries have already demonstrated their excellence as a profession in this area through their support of materials for online education. With this new role promoting OER, libraries continue what they've always done in building quality collections, but now expanded to materials for the classroom, and with an eye for adopting a price agnostic approach. To support this work, LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network surveyed faculty across the state over a two month period in 2016 to assist with developing the program goals and initiatives of their Affordable Learning LOUISiana project. Over 700 faculty participated in the survey, representing two & four year and public & private institutions of higher education. Faculty shared their perceptions of the suitability of OER for their courses, their levels of concern for textbook affordability, and provided insight into what strategies would persuade them to include OER in their courses. In addition to sharing results from this survey, a general discussion of how these results influenced the design of a program for library advocacy will be discussed. Topics covered will be aligning educational programming for librarians to build capacity on campuses, investigating library sponsored programming that directly engages faculty and instructional support staff, leveraging Open Access and Open Education Weeks, as well as developing partnerships and best practices within the library community.

Speakers
TG

Teri Gallaway

LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network


Friday November 4, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B12

11:30am

The Open Research Agenda
The Open Education Research Hub (OER Hub) is an award-winning open education research group based at The Open University, UK. The Open Research Agenda is a global consultation exercise that has been taking place throughout 2016 and will reach its final presentation at Open Education. So far, contributions have been received from dozens of key stakeholders in the open education world and results presented at the Open Education Global 2016; OER16; CALRG Annual Conference 2016 and other international meetings and events. At the time of writing (Apr 2016) we have received contributions from 60 respondents across 17 countries (5 continents) but this is expected to significantly increase by the time of presentation.



One of the aims of this ongoing consultation is to understand how different stakeholders (advocates; educators; funders; managers; producers; policymakers; students) in different countries perceive the challenges and priorities for research into open education. Analysis of the existing results will be presented with key findings and talking points highlighted. The conference session will be divided between plenary presentation of key findings and moderated discussion involving delegates, who will be encouraged to contribute to the consultation. The session will be used to interrogate and validate existing results as well as generate new data about research priorities.



Key thematic findings that have already emerged include:

- Different research agendas for the Global North / Global South

- Understanding barriers to adoption

- Recognition of non-formal learning resulting from use of open resources

- Understanding OER policy through key implementation drivers

- Sustainability in the OER ecosystem



The consultation is also supported online through the project website and social media accounts, allowing contribution from those who cannot make the session in person but also allowing participants to connect with others who have taken part.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Farrow

Rob Farrow

Research Fellow, The Open University
Research Fellow @openuniversity / Open Education through a philosophical lens / Projects: @oer_hub @gogn_oer @oerworldmap @JIME_journal / Cat: @tailz_of_terror | | Project URLS: | http://oerhub.net/ | https://oerworldmap.org/ | http://go-gn.net/ | http://www-jime.open.ac.uk/
MW

Martin Weller

Open University


Friday November 4, 2016 11:30am - 11:55am
B14

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday November 4, 2016 12:00pm - 1:15pm
Grand Ballroom

1:15pm

Course Redesign Pilot for OER Implementation at George Mason University: A University-Wide Effort
Successful course redesign for OER implementation requires a university-wide effort, with faculty working together with their academic departments, libraries, instructional design units, university presses/publishers, centers for faculty excellence, as well as other stakeholders across the university. Among the stakeholders, librarians play a critical role, assisting faculty with locating and identifying digital resources, open educational resources, and public domain materials, as primary or supplementary course materials. In order to reduce instructional costs for students, and to improve teaching and learning outcomes, George Mason University has recently launched a pilot project focusing on innovative and accessible course redesign which integrates use of open educational digital materials. In Spring 2016, competitive grants were awarded to 11 faculty to lead the redesign of 20 undergraduate and graduate courses across 10 disciplines. Courses in the pilot include those that (1) have high enrollment numbers; (2) required courses for majors; (3) count in the Mason Core (general educational requirements); or (4) carry high textbook costs. The redesigned courses using open educational resources will be taught in Fall 2016 or Spring 2017. In this presentation, we will provide an update on the course redesign pilot for adopting, assessing, and developing OERs; we will describe the role of Mason University Libraries and other university stakeholders in the course-redesign OER project; and we will share Mason faculty and student perspectives about integrating OERs into the redesigned courses.

Speakers
avatar for Claudia Holland

Claudia Holland

Head, Scholarly Communicaton and Copyright, George Mason University
Claudia C. Holland is Head of Scholarly Communication and Copyright in the Mason Publishing Group, George Mason University Libraries. She leads the libraries’ scholarly communication initiatives and educational outreach, and has served as the University’s Copyright Officer since 2008. As part of her work, she administers Mason’s Open Access Publishing Fund, dedicated to assisting faculty and students with publishing in open access... Read More →
avatar for Darlene  Smucny

Darlene Smucny

Assistant Director, Quality in Online Instruction, George Mason University
Darlene oversees the online course peer review process at Mason and assists departments with customized course and program reviews. Her focus is quality in online courses and programs, with an emphasis on faculty development, services, and support. Offering an experienced instructor’s perspective of online teaching and learning, Darlene can share guidance, tips, and resources for getting started and actionable feedback for course improvement... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B18

1:15pm

Local OER: developing collections for developing nations
This session discusses the development of the Darakht-e Danesh Library for Educators in Afghanistan, a repository of open educational resources in Dari, Pashto, and English - the three languages taught in Afghan public schools. We are creating a multilingual collection of teaching and learning materials for teachers, education organizations, and others with an interest in education in Afghanistan, a region in which teachers have limited access to learning resources. We describe the process of seeking permissions not only to include content in our collection but also to translate it from English (by far the most common language for OERs) into Dari and Pashto, as well as the work done with volunteer translators to produce said translations. We believe that OER collections in the local language, which can be developed and adapted to fit the local context, present untapped potential for supporting teachers in developing countries and promoting literacy in the mother tongue(s) of students in these countries. We pursued partnerships with local organizations such as the Afghan Women's Writing Project to facilitate the development of locally contextualized educational materials. The incorporation of crowdsourcing principles allows for the creation and sharing of local learning materials by educators for each other, although education of contributors around issues such as licensing is required for such a system to work effectively. The systems and processes the Darakht-e Danesh Library has developed through the trial-and-error of applied practice may serve others interested in exploring this model as one strategy to generate a pool of relevant local language content that helps to vitalize the teaching and learning of mother tongue languages in developing nations.

Speakers
NA

Nicole Askin

Darakht-e Danesh Library


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B17

1:15pm

The Open SUNY COTE Quality Review (OSCQR) Process and Rubric for the review and improvement of online courses.
The Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence (COTE) has developed an online course design rubric and process that addresses both the instructional design and accessibility of an online course that is openly licensed for anyone to use and adapt. The aim of the Open SUNY COTE Quality Review (OSCQR) Rubric and Process is to assist online instructional designers and online faculty improve the quality and accessibility of their online courses, while also providing a system-wide approach to collect data that informs faculty development, and supports large scale online course design review and refresh efforts systematically and consistently. The OSCQR rubric and process are currently being used by 38 SUNY institutions.



There are two components OSCQR:

1. The OSCQR Process provides a Framework and Dashboard that support a campus-tailored and scalable approach to improving the instructional design of online or blended courses.

2. The OSCQR Rubric has 37 online course design standards and 37 accessibility standards. The Rubric is flexible and designed to be used in a variety of course quality assurance approaches.



We are in the process of improving OSCQR and will launch a new version of the rubric that will have integrated accessibility standards and will include course-level standards for incorporating OER into online instruction and be more extensible for standards dealing with other topics.

The rubric can be used formatively with new online faculty to help guide, inform and influence the design of their new online courses. It is non-evaluative: Conceptually the rubric and process approach course review and refresh as a professional development exercise, to guide faculty in their understanding of improving course design from an effective practices perspective, rather than as a course evaluation, or quality assurance procedure. It prioritizes changes. An Action Plan is automatically generated by the course review process that presents recommendations for course design improvements based on the review, and assists in prioritization of course revisions based on the estimated time to make those improvements. The rubric also provides suggestions for course design improvements for each standard that can be selected from a menu of options by each reviewer to supplement reviewer feedback. The rubric can be customized. Standards can be added, edited, and /or eliminated. There is no license fee for use of the rubric. It is shared with a creative Creative Commons license: CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US. Because the OSCQR Rubric is licensed under Creative Commons, and the Dashboard is licensed under LGPL, the entire process can be shared, used by anyone with no cost, and can be customized to address individual campus environments.

If you attend this session you will:

1. Become an Open SUNY Fellow in the "Friend of SUNY" role so we can continue the conversation started in the session.

2. Earn a badge for participation by giving us feedback on the planned improvements to the rubric.

3. Take home the OSCQR Rubric



OSCQR Links:



The Rubric:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1ICwNCdRQTw7thRKCMLonrVaoyIin584gjUcu96YGzS8/edit?usp=sharing



OSCQR rubric annotations:

https://1e91997432919e6f3d6f400e666382bb0475f7f7-www.googledrive.com/host/0BzXVZ_L-QpX8ZUtERjhBU2UyZUU#1a



Adopting the OSCQR rubric:

http://commons.suny.edu/cote/course-supports/oscqr-rubric/if-you-want-to-use-the-oscqr-analytics-on-your-campus/



A video overview of the rubric and dashboard:

https://youtu.be/XfoHwjb_AEA

Speakers
avatar for Alexandra  M. Pickett

Alexandra M. Pickett

Director, Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence
I lead the Open SUNY Center for Online Teaching Excellence. Talk to me about online teaching and learning. Online faculty development. Online instructional design. Large-scale online faculty development. Building online communities of practice. Online course quality, standards, and effective practices. Online instructional designers. Open content. Badging. Badging professional development and online community engagement.


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B16

1:15pm

Incorporating Open Source Into Computer Science: Why (and how?!)
This presentation is intended to provide instructors with working knowledge of open source software concepts and communities. In this brief introduction, we will:

* talk about what open source is and why it is gaining traction in the business world;
* explore how instructors (and their students) can benefit by incorporating open source into the curriculum;
* review what differentiates open source from proprietary software; and
* discuss how teaching open source in an open way aligns with many current pedagogical practices, such as continuous assessment and cooperative learning.

We'll start with a quick definition and history of open source as a prelude to talking about the state of open source in business today. Then we'll cover the business drivers that are creating a need for students to learn open source, and what benefits you and your students can expect to see when you incorporate more open source into your classes.

Next, we will look at the key differences between open source and proprietary software, from a legal point of view as well as a philosophical one. We'll talk about how the legal aspects of open source, combined with open source principles, create a fundamentally different, community-centric software development environment.

We'll talk about the benefits -- and potential "gotchas" -- of embedding students in open source projects and how you as an instructor can think about those.

Finally, we'll talk about additional resources for instructors who want to learn more about open source: mailing lists, courses, and online resources will be provided for additional exploration of the topic.

Speakers
avatar for Gina Likins

Gina Likins

University Outreach, Red Hat
I have a long history with and interest in education, having obtained my North Carolina teacher certification and taught both high school biology and environmental science. In addition, I’ve taught computer science classes (mostly “Introduction to the Web/HTML”) to students ranging from seventh graders to adult learners (and everything in between). | | The University Outreach team at Red Hat exists to help universities incorporate... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 1:40pm
B11

1:15pm

A year in review: Where are we with #GoOpen and what's next?
Over the past few years there has been an increased interest around high-quality open educational resources (OER) in K-12 and the benefits OER can provide in terms of access, equity, and personalization of resources. In the fall of 2015, the U.S. Department of Education launched the #GoOpen Campaign to encourage states, school districts and educators to use openly licensed educational materials to transform teaching and learning. As of early 2016 there were 15 #GoOpen States and over 40 #GoOpen districts. This session provides an update on the first year of #GoOpen from Joseph South, Director of OET at the U.S. Department of Education and Layla Bonnot, OER Lead at CCSSO. It also features Bobby Keener, Chief Information Officer and Team Lead for #GoOpen Virginia and includes both a district representative and educator sharing their perspectives on the first year of the campaign and the move toward implementation, adoption, and sustainability of OER.

This session will be set up to allow attendees to hear the federal/state/local/classroom perspective in small groups after a brief presentation to the full group.

Speakers
avatar for Layla Bonnot

Layla Bonnot

Senior Program Associate, CCSSO
I lead the OER work at CCSSO. We serve state superintendents of K-12 education in the U.S. Talk to me about #GoOpen, the Learning Registry, K-12 OER education, and Federal and state policies.
EL

Ernest Longwort

Assistant Director of Technology, Chesterfield County Public Schools
Ernie Longworth is the Assistant Director of Curriculum and Instruction for Chesterfield County Public Schools and is a member of the executive board of the Virginia Society for Technology in Education (VSTE) . His current work is at the intersection of educational technology, curriculum and instruction with a focus on the creation of a digital curriculum to support blended learning. Additionally, Mr. Longworth is working to ensure students in... Read More →
avatar for Kristina Peters

Kristina Peters

K-12 Open Education Fellow, U.S. Department of Education
Talk to me about transitioning to the use of openly licensed educational resources in place of traditional instructional materials. #GoOpen
MW

Mary Williams

Teacher, Chesterfield County Public Schools


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 2:05pm
B13

1:15pm

The future is now: a network-based approach to the next generation of open textbooks
In the past year, the Open Textbook Network (OTN) has grown to include more than 40 members representing over 150 college and university campuses. The OTN helped these members start or expand local open textbook programs, with programming that resulted in 44% of participating faculty adopting an open textbook from the OTN's Open Textbook Library. However, a large number of faculty who are willing to adopt open textbooks are turned away because there is no open textbook available for their courses (in their subject area).

The OTN is regularly approached by faculty wanting to know how to get support writing an open textbook. While this is an encouraging trend, only a few large institutions currently have the resources to explore it, and each is investing a significant amount of money and duplicative effort to build their own technical platform and navigate the complex technical and logistical issues of publishing.

At the same time, Hugh McGuire - the founder of Pressbooks, an open source book production platform used in many open textbook projects and co-founder of The Rebus Foundation, which works with organizations and academic institutions and individuals to help create more open textbooks - was looking for partners to develop the Rebus workflow for open textbook creation.

The OTN invited three OTN members to participate in a pilot - UMass Amherst, University of Arizona, and University of Washington - to create textbooks on their campus while helping to develop and refine the Rebus workflow. Between them, these institutions presented a variety of open textbook projects at different stages, in different disciplines, and with different needs in terms of services.

This presentation will provide the vision for a collaborative, network-based approach to publishing the next generation of open textbooks by sharing the results of this pilot project. Marilyn Billings and Jeremy Smith (UMass Amherst), Cheryl Cullier (University of Arizona) and Chelle Batchelor (University of Washington) will present a needs assessment of their pilot projects and what challenges they face in creating open textbooks at their individual campuses. Representatives from the OTN and Rebus pilot will also outline how a long-term solution for these challenges is addressed by developing a workflow and process that enables members of all types and sizes of institutions to engage in publishing. It creates the next generation of open textbooks in multiple subjects (going beyond the "highest enrolled" model) and emphasizes the network's, and higher education's, capacity for developing global solutions that support the needs of our faculty, our students, our institutions, and higher education.


Speakers
avatar for Karen Lauritsen

Karen Lauritsen

Director of Publishing and Collections, Open Textbook Network
HM

Hugh McGuire

Founder, Pressbooks


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 2:05pm
B12

1:15pm

FutuOER: Designing the Next Generation of Open Education
What is the future of Open Education? This panel and audience discussion will explore possible visions of open education in 2036, using a series of broadly solicited papers as a starting point. These essays are available at http://futuOER.org — please review, comment and consider in preparation for this discussion.

The "open education" conversation of the last few years has been consumed with the hype of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and the use of Open Textbooks and Open Educational Resources (OERs) as the savior for spiraling college costs. However, these discussions obscure an underlying opportunity for Open Education-one that is not driven by a vendor's interests nor governed by the constraints of higher education's traditional models--to focus on demonstrated learning and mastery for the betterment of oneself whether in formal or informal settings.

Combining longstanding approaches from instructional design, psychology and learning science with new affordances provided by advances in technology and data science afford us an opportunity to build the better mousetrap when combined with the core philosophy of the "open education movement." Recent conversations have focused around OER 2.0, but these are mired in the world of today-politics, limitations and hype-to really consider what a truly innovative and game changing innovation might be possible with Open Education. This panel discussion will explore what we believe is truly possible with the understanding, tools and resources at our disposal.

One of the strongest benefits of the "open" of today (whether they be traditional OER, MOOCs, Open Textbooks or anything open) is the scale at which educators, administrators and policy makers at a wide range of institutions are really beginning to pay attention to "Instructional Design 101" in the way they design and construct learning experiences. (Yes, they should have been doing this all along!) Whether they are driven by cost considerations, or the hype of MOOCs many faculty are looking at their courses with fresh eyes. In examining their instructional practice, more and more faculty find the need to rethink the way they've been teaching. This is an incredible opportunity to use open-educational resources, practice, pedagogy, data and more-to build a true next generation learning experience. What if we dare to dream? What does education look like in 20 years if we can side-step existing constraints, use a true open approach and leverage new scientific and pedagogical advances?

At the core of the matter are the following questions: What have we learned or do we know about how "open" can amplify effective learning experiences? And how do we realize these things in next generation of Open Education?

We begin with what we know includes things such as: competencies; learning outcomes; analytics; the power of scale; interactive, feedback loops; limitless formative assessment included in or linked to content; generative learning; linking digital with hands-on/physical; and so on. And continue with what's possible with creative integration and innovative approaches to open education.

Speakers
avatar for Norman Bier

Norman Bier

Director, Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon University
UD

Una Daly

Open Education Consortium
CG

Cable Green

Creative Commons
avatar for David Kernohan

David Kernohan

The Followers of the Apocalypse
avatar for Brandon Muramatsu

Brandon Muramatsu

Assistant Director, Strategic Education Initiative, MIT
avatar for Hal Plotkin

Hal Plotkin

Senior Open Policy Fellow, Creative Commons USA
Particularly interested in strategies for promoting institutional and instructor adoption of open educational resources.
avatar for Katsusuke Shigeta

Katsusuke Shigeta

Associate Professor, Hokkaido University
Associate Director at Center for Open Education, Hokkaido University. Open Education and Educational Technology
avatar for Kim Thanos

Kim Thanos

CEO, Lumen Learning
avatar for Willem van Valkenburg

Willem van Valkenburg

Boardmember Open Education Consortium, Delft University of Technology
Responsible for the production and delivery of all the Open, Online and Blended Courses of TU Delft. This includes OpenCourseWare, MOOCs, ProfEd, Online MSc and blended courses. | I'm also Board member of the Open Education Consortium.
MW

Martin Weller

Open University


Friday November 4, 2016 1:15pm - 2:05pm
Grand Ballroom

1:40pm

Canvas Network's transition from passive promoter to active promoter of open education
Canvas Network was born in 2013 as an open platform for open education. You could say that openness is in our DNA.

We believe openness is critical to making learning accessible for everyone and to ensuring that creativity and innovation thrive in education. That's why, at the start of 2016, we conducted an internal review of our primary mission-to promote openness, innovation, and experimentation in education. We discovered that although Canvas Network is an open platform, some of our policies and practices have actually hindered our ability to champion open education. This, and concerns voiced by open education advocates about the status of MOOCs, was the impetus for a new strategy to further align our mission with the open education movement.

In 2014, David Wiley declared that "MOOCs "_ have done more harm to the cause of open education than anything else in the history of the movement. They have inflicted this harm by promoting and popularizing an abjectly impoverished understanding of the word "open.'"

Wiley's statement reflects the view that MOOCs and MOOC providers have hijacked the term "open," replacing the movement's definition and popularizing their own. Our strategy is to embrace-and be embraced by-the open education movement by striving to achieve the true meaning of openness. This type of change will require an internal cultural shift, which we plan to bring about through new policies and processes, as well as a campaign to encourage educators (both teachers and administrators) to embrace open education when they launch courses on Canvas Network.

We began this shift by envisioning what our ideal open, online platform would look like. First, it would have a low barrier to entry for learners. It would offer more courses with Creative Commons than private licenses. And it would make content accessible to other instructors and designers to retain, reuse, revise, remix, and redistribute.

When we compared our ideal platform with the reality of Canvas Network, we discovered that only 40 percent of our courses had Creative Commons licenses and only 25 percent were publicly-viewable with the course URL. Only 21 learning resources from our courses had been shared to Canvas Commons, a learning object repository where teachers can access all or parts of courses for reuse. The takeaway: Having the ability to deliver open education is not the same as promoting open education.

Our team identified three goals we could implement right away with a target completion date of March 1, 2017:

* Increase the number of publicly-viewable courses to at least 60 percent, which will lower the barrier to entry for learners.
* Increase the number of Creative Commons-licensed course materials to 60 percent.
* Contribute at least 300 courses and/or objects to Canvas Commons.

In this session, you will learn about our efforts to shift Canvas Network from being a passive to an active promoter of open education through policy changes and an educational campaign. We also want to take the time to hear your questions, comments, and suggestions.

Speakers
HM

Hilary Melander

Instructure, Instructure
I am passionate about life, learning, challenging myself, and striving for excellence.


Friday November 4, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B18

1:40pm

How to FLOSS, but not for your teeth!
Free libre open source software (FLOSS) has the potential to be a powerful open educational ICT tool, particularly in the developing world, but also any community where educational resources and services are challenging to come by. In spite of considerable potential gains for education in rural or inadequately funded areas, FLOSS is under-utilized, under-staffed, and unsupported. Both educators' and students' perspectives must be understood if this gap is to be ameliorated. Toward supporting open educational resources in the world's education systems, this research investigates usage and perception of FLOSS as well as pedagogical preferences from a sample of participants (N=40) at the Gaeddu College of Business Studies in the Kingdom of Bhutan. Although the unified technology acceptance and use theory (UTAUT) guides this research and is supported in organizational settings, it is not supported in the context of higher education in Bhutan. Statistically significant results indicated that students and faculty or staff have disparate perceptions of FLOSS. Interviews elaborated that there was a relationship for this sample between how technology is used and incorporated with attitudes toward technology. The research's validity is limited by low participation, frequent lack of electricity, and low bandwidth. However, results imply that pedagogy, attitude, and especially teachers' roles, are relevant constructs for understanding educational technology acceptance and use in Bhutan and potentially other communities with similar barriers to education. This work aims to contribute to the growing body of investigation of open education resources, including ICT acceptance, in areas where education is especially difficult to support. Despite formal centers and programs in Bhutan for technology and computer training, one of the most interesting findings of the research was that students eschew these in favor of informal networks among themselves in their social groups to learn and share ICT resources, including those for education.

Speakers
avatar for Cathryn Bennett

Cathryn Bennett

Director of International Programs, Greensboro College
Open, international, and cross-cultural higher education are my focal areas. Current research projects and collaborations with experts from the U.S., Europe, and South Asia continue to hone my expertise and interest in research methodologies for various settings, culturally-situated approaches, and new pathways to expanding my knowledge and understanding. Research interests include social and educational psychology, motivation theory, teacher... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B17

1:40pm

Playing with Jello: Faculty experiences adopting openness as a core value
This presentation reports on the experiences of three faculty members designing and developing a Master's degree in Learning and Technology when they adopted openness as a core value and key design principle.



A growing body of evidence suggests that adoption of open educational resources (OER), and especially open textbooks, leads to lower costs for students without having negative impacts on academic outcomes (e.g., Hilton, in press; Wiley, Williams, DeMarte, & Hilton, 2016). While the benefits of open textbooks and OER are compelling, little is known about programs that are designed with openness as a core value. What does it mean to embrace open practices and embody an open philosophy at the program and course level within a Master's program? What are faculty experiences with such an approach? How can the student experience be optimized? In what ways does openness support a diverse student body? What tensions arise and what supports are required to facilitate the transition to an MA degree that not only uses open textbooks but is defined by openness?



The MA program that we will present represents a case study for the open community. In this degree, students contribute meaningfully to digital learning networks and communities in the field. The degree prepares students to work in the creation and evaluation of digital learning environments and apply theoretical and practical knowledge to critically analyze learning innovations and assess their impact on organizations and society. Openness is central to the achievement of this program goal. Openness was adopted as a program value predicated on the philosophical stance that open practices lead to collaboration and the development of a digital mindset that values sharing and cultivates networked learning.



In this case study of an MA program, open practices are evidenced at the course level in the design of the online experience; through the use of "renewable assignments"; authentic assessment opportunities, in resource curation and, through online facilitation approaches. At the program level, it manifests itself in the intentional open spaces that have been designed into the program which require student identification and completion of personalized areas of inquiry. It is also evidenced through the adoption of open pedagogy as a design principle that informs design and delivery decisions at the course and program level.



Initial tensions such as coming to a common understanding of openness and what openness can be within the constraints of an institution; how openness supports or detracts from online community; the role of openness in the creation of safe learning environments and, ways to support adjunct faculty for designing for openness will be highlighted in this presentation. This MA program is currently under development so by November additional strategies that have been used to develop a common understanding around openness and open pedagogy at the faculty and institutional level will also be discussed. In addition, various supports that have been used in working with adjunct faculty in course design with openness as a core value will be shared.



References



Hilton III, J. (in press).

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Childs

Elizabeth Childs

Associate Professor and Program Head MA Learning and Technology, Royal Roads University
designing a Masters program with openness, networked learning and digital mindset as core design principles.


Friday November 4, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B16

1:40pm

College Affordability, Social Justice and the Case for an Ethic of Openness
Higher education is approaching a period of transformation unlike anything experienced since the Enlightenment era. The long held belief that college is a privilege is being questioned not only by a generation of young adults seeking the opportunities of previous generations, but also by the top contenders of a political party seeking to hold the highest position in our nation. The assertion that college is a right, and as such must be made available and affordable to all citizens brings with it a host of assumptions, questions and dilemmas.



The ethics of education is among the most talked about issues in the run up to our next presidential election. Proposals for tuition free community college, tuition free public colleges and universities, and student loan forgiveness are grounded in a theory of Social Justice. What seems to be missing from these crucial discussions is the fact that educational leaders and activists have been addressing the ethics of education through the concept of Openness.



This presentation will give a brief history of some of the key transitions in education from Ancient Greece through modern times, and highlight ethical theory as it applies to educational opportunity. The idea that college affordability is a social justice issue that has been largely influenced by the open education movement will be presented, and participants will be invited to share their own thoughts on how open education redefine higher education for the 21st century.


Speakers
avatar for Preston Davis

Preston Davis

Director, Instructional Service, NOVA
I have worked in higher education for 20 years… as faculty, administrator, and consultant. As Director of Instructional Services at NOVA, I oversee the online learning and educational technology services, manage instructional training and certification, and lead the OER initiative. I also find time to teach a philosophy course on occasion. | I earned BS and MA degrees from Old Dominion University, and a doctorate from The George... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 1:40pm - 2:05pm
B11

2:15pm

Leveraging Open Educational Resources to Expand Access to Adult Higher Education
Higher education is expensive, especially when including textbook costs. This presentation will explore how leveraging open educational resources (OER) and technologies can significantly reduce costs for students and increase access to higher education. Presenters from College for America will provide insight on their strategic use of OER.

College for America (CfA) is an accredited, nonprofit college dedicated to developing online, competency-based degrees specifically for its diverse population of working adults. The student experience at CfA is unique-students work at their own pace to complete workplace-relevant projects in order to demonstrate mastery of competencies. Part of CfA's challenge is to design rigorous academic programs for a total cost to students of $3,000 a year. Two of the areas that CfA targets to reduce costs for students include adopting and adapting OER and open technology. CfA students never purchase textbooks, nor do they need to purchase software-all of the learning resources and tools they need are provided. This presentation will provide an overview of CfA's approach, including a discussion of its successes and challenges. It will also present a framework that participants can use to select and apply free and open resources and tools for online education.

Topics will include:

- essential free and open-educational resources (OER) and technologies
- approaches to curating, archiving and maintaining learning resources
- essential considerations for selecting and supporting a mix of free educational tools
- selecting free desktop and web-based applications for instructors, designers and students
- using curriculum design principles that let students successfully use the technologies they already have access to.

Speakers
DB

Dan Blickensderfer

College For America (CfA) at Southern New Hampshire University


Friday November 4, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B11

2:15pm

Beyond the Repository: Toward Deeper Understanding of OER Implementation
Tracy Pitzer, Director of Instructional Leadership at Puyallup School District will be co-presenting this session.

In the K-12 space, there is a push to increase discoverability of open resources and develop repositories of OER. While important, this is not the endgame. It's critical to recognize that there is a range of OER interest from K-12 districts and their needs go beyond just finding discrete resources.

Each of the stages along the scale from using open materials to promoting open practice, has its own set of questions. For some districts, the initial foray into using OER may be as far as they go, but for others it can be the beginning of a journey to iterative curriculum development and student involvement in the creation of open resources.

It's important to recognize where educators are entering this OER continuum and provide them with the appropriate supports and guidance to help in their effective implementation. In this session, we'll share some stories from the field in Washington State:

- Fife School District is just starting to explore OER. They need to understand how OER fit into the instructional materials landscape, ascertain whether there are appropriate resources for adoption consideration, and communicate to their stakeholders the value of open beyond "free stuff on the internet".

- Spokane Public Schools needed comprehensive, standards-aligned mathematics materials and adopted an open resource as an alternative to expensive purchased or leased instructional materials. Now, they need collaboration on developing implementation resources, strategies for dealing with print to ensure equity of access, and professional development options.

- Puyallup School District, dissatisfied with current instructional materials choices, set out on their own to pull together resources to develop their own Civics curriculum. As a district starting to curate and create, they need help understanding licensing, clarity on copyright ownership, proper attribution examples, remixing tutorials, and a firm grasp that free is not open. 

For each case, we'll discuss the vital supports for their stage along the spectrum and brainstorm how to best provide assistance to sustain their efforts.

OSPI Interactive Copyright and Licensing Guide: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2689472/CopyrightLicensingGuide
Generic version of Interactive Copyright and Licensing Guide and Quick Start Guide to Openly Licensed Images:
http://digitallearning.k12.wa.us/oer/licensing.php

 

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Soots

Barbara Soots

OER and Instructional Materials Program Manager, OSPI
Barbara Soots is the Open Educational Resources Program Manager at the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction in Washington. She implements state legislation directing creation of an openly licensed courseware library with alignment to state K-12 learning standards. She also manages an awareness campaign informing school districts about open resources and their importance in the changing educational landscape.



Friday November 4, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B13

2:15pm

'Open Education in the Indian context : new approaches and challenges'
India has the largest population of University-age students in the world and the growing numbers by 2025 may challenge the inadequacy and quality of the Higher Education system. "New Education policy" is taking adequate measures to address this challenging task of providing world class education to the youth of India and steer the economy of the country on an upward trajectory, by taking initiatives to link higher education with employability, skill development and entrepreneurship.



Due to lack of physical seats in higher education institutions, open and distance education plays an important role to provide access to the masses in terms of quality education for degree programs and skill enhancement certificate courses e.g. University of Delhi ( http://www.du.ac.in) .Open education can make higher education more accessible to working students with limited financial resources , and encourage them for "Earn while you Learn". The students pursue degree programs through distance learning mode and simultaneously, take up industry linked professional certificate courses which makes them employable. With millions of Indians leap-frogging technologies, going from limited access to electricity to ownership of smart phone technologies; even rural and impoverished Indians are connected to the world like never before and therefore, ODL is a sustainable approach to achieve the target of educating large numbers.



In developing countries like India, MOOCs( Massive Online Open Course) could help towards building a new model of higher education which is away from a Bricks and mortar model of an Institution of higher learning. There could be MOOC on basic general components in respective subject fields. Also, e-learning and MOOC courseware could be used by Indian Universities to lower the cost of instruction even for the science labs. However, the rise and potential decline of MOOC educational system in the developed world presents a unique challenge for the Indian system to learn from; as educational institutions attempt to connect and educate these population. Apart from MOOC, there can be online- onsite courses with subsidized fees, e -learning manuals and use of flipped class.

With a robust system of accreditation and credit transfers; Open and Distance learning is the key to meet the needs and aspirations of higher education system in developing countries.

However, the major challenge of implementing massive open education source and industry oriented online courses , lies in the fact that firstly the country's economy should be able to support and promote digital literacy for the masses and envisage provision for access devices to institutions and learners. Other challenge lies in quality content creation as per global standards and also to overcome impediments like the bandwidth issue, online assessment, credits transfer to Universities, certification etc. The use of ICT and Cloud Technology can leverage their potential for the benefit of all learners in educational institutions by encouraging "learning anywhere anytime" mode and also promote lifelong and continuous learning that will contribute to global knowledge economy.




Speakers
avatar for Mamta Bhatia

Mamta Bhatia

Associate Professor, Acharya Narendra Dev College,University of Delhi
Dr. Mamta Bhatia is a recipient of Fulbright – Nehru International Education Administrator’s Award for 2014 and attended the Seminar under which she visited several community colleges in Washington, New York and Florida; to understand the concept and challenges of community colleges and Higher Education. | She received Young Scientist award in 1987 for outstanding research on Fusion Reactor. | As a member of CII (Confederation of Indian... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B17

2:15pm

Transforming and opening education with practical pedagogy and publishing strategies
The value of academic libraries is established by demonstrating support for student and faculty success, however, our role and value is expanding as a result of the demands to transform the academy; making college education more affordable, increasingly accountable for performance, increasing student access, while controlling costs. These extraordinary challenges for colleges and universities are opportunities for libraries to provide key leadership and support strategies that open doors for transformation and sustainable practices that enhance teaching, learning, research and scholarship.



This talk focuses on a set of high-impact strategies that support student and faculty success by developing open access digital scholarship, publishing open textbooks, and providing student scholar internships. The presentation will provide useful ideas that draw from experiences with Open SUNY Textbooks, Digital Thoreau, Humboldt State University Press, and the HSU Library Scholar Internship program. Attendees will understand practical library tactics that can become crucial assets to campuses, and emerge as key strategies for transforming higher education.


Speakers
avatar for Cyril Oberlander

Cyril Oberlander

University Library Dean, Humboldt State University
Just launched Humboldt State University Press http://digitalcommons.humboldt.edu/ | | Special Collections Librarian and Library Student Scholar Interns are working on very exciting publishing and digital scholarship projects.


Friday November 4, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B16

2:15pm

A Library Consortial Approach to Facilitating OER Adoptions
In April 2015 the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC) Directors Council hosted David Ernst, Director of the Open Textbook Network (OTN), at its spring meeting to learn more about OTN and the resources of the Open Textbook Library. His visit spurred UALC members Brigham Young University-Lee Library and the University of Utah-Marriott Library to join OTN as institutional members and later for UALC to join as a consortial member.



To create a broader conversation around open textbooks and OER among the state's academic librarians and interested faculty and students, UALC adapted a successful two-day workshop template developed by Texas A&M University for the Southeastern Conference. Financial constraints and a desire to hold this workshop during the middle of the academic semester with student and teaching faculty participation made a one-day workshop more viable. Working with SPARC's Nicole Allen, UALC workshop planners devised a one-day workshop hosted by Brigham Young University (BYU) to which 3-5-person teams were invited from each member school. During the October 2015 workshop, teams were guided through a process that resulted in at least the creation of a local skeleton plan for coordinated and strategic action related to advancing open textbook adoptions.



As teams reported out, it became clear that a common part of most local plans was the creation and administration of a baseline survey to determine local awareness of and attitudes toward open textbooks among students and faculty. Members of BYU's OER Research Group offered to devise a survey which could be administered by each institution for the purpose of providing local data and a comparable statewide data set. In January 2016, participating institutions began administering the survey to selected faculty and students. Due to local IRB requirements and surveys that had been previously scheduled for administration, some institutions were not able to participate until fall 2016. Analysis of this data indicates differences in awareness and attitude across the various institutions, strongly suggesting that a one-size-fits-all approach to facilitating open textbook adoptions would not be optimal.



In addition to the survey, UALC worked with OTN to develop a train-the-trainer model in place of its one-day on-campus faculty workshops to enhance creation of a state-wide knowledge base among academic librarians. UALC formed an OER Committee to create a mechanism for Utah's academic librarians to exchange information, to identify other sources of appropriate training for the state's academic librarians, and to develop and utilize best practices in their individual settings. The OER Committee also provides statewide coordination for events such as OER Week, long-term maintenance of a Utah OER website, training opportunities for librarians, faculty, and students, and other relevant activities.


Speakers
JP

Jennifer Paustenbaugh

University Librarian, Brigham Young University


Friday November 4, 2016 2:15pm - 2:40pm
B12

2:15pm

Indie as Open: Decentralizing the University with Personal API's
What happens if we break student data out of the bowels of the institution, hand it back to students, and provide them with an API to moderate institutional access? It's a revolt against centralized, monetized, dehumanized data farming (our cultural paradigm?) - and it makes awareness of digital exploitation fundamental to the pedagogical mission of the university.



A Personal API creates a culture of openness, promoting digital literacy by revealing the structures of institutional data-gathering on the one hand and lending students and third party providers the documentation to create their own tools on the other. Sounds something like EdTech going Indie, going Open.



After meeting in March of 2016 at the #IndieEdTech weekend at Davidson College Kin, Phil, Olga, Adam, Erika, and Andrew connected around this two-fold mission of the Personal API. Kin Lane, the API Evangelist, and Adam Croom, Director of Digital Learning at the University of Oklahoma, will discuss the technological and ideological implications of using retainable, reusable, revisable, remixable, and redistributable API's. Andrew and Erika will offer student perspectives, showing that revealing the structure of the institution built for you can only do its job when students design the structures with you. Phil Windley, Enterprise Architect in the Office of the CIO at BYU, and Olga Belikov, a BYU Instructional Psychology and Technology graduate student, will outline BYU's implementation of complementary University and Personal API's.



This panel represents a reclamation of identity and power in education through decentralized data ownership and use.


Speakers
avatar for Olga Belikov

Olga Belikov

Student, Brigham Young University
AR

Andrew Rikard

Student, Class of '17, Davidson College


Friday November 4, 2016 2:15pm - 3:05pm
B14

2:40pm

Open Education to Support Adult Basic Education: An Exploration of Opportunities and Constraints
In June 2013, UNESCO's Institute for Statistics reported the global adult literacy rate for those age 15 and older was 84%. In absolute numbers, 774 million people over the age of 15 lack the basic literacy skills to read and write. In the U.S., an estimated 36 million adult learners lack basic math, language, and literacy skills. Despite their numbers, these adults who are in need of educational opportunities to gain basic math and literacy skills are too often the "forgotten segment" in discussions of open education.



Session presenters will lead a discussion of both the untapped opportunities and constraints of open education for designers, instructors, and learners in adult basic education (ABE) contexts. Through an analysis of recent reports on the ABE instructional context, as well as the experiences of the presenters and the audience, we will contemplate (a) the reasons why adult learners engage in ABE courses, (b) the nature of the knowledge, skills, and motivation gaps faced by these adult learners, and (c) factors within the learning and instructional environment that may affect adoption of open educational resources (OER) and open educational practices within the ABE context.



In addition, we will explore the needs of those facilitating ABE courses and programs, such as volunteer and part-time instructor professional development, and identify the unique constraints and affordances of the ABE instructional setting (e.g., online, in-person, or blended settings) that could influence OER and open education creation and use. Presenters will also contemplate the feasibility of remixing and revising existing K12 OER for the ABE context, as well as involving adult learners in the creation of open materials.

Speakers
AD

Amanda Duffy

Senior Researcher, American Institutes for Research
avatar for Jennifer Maddrell

Jennifer Maddrell

Designers for Learning
I founded Designers for Learning as a nonprofit to offer service-learning experiences for instructional design professional development. Ask me about our #OpenABE service-MOOC on Canvas Network. Participants in the service-MOOC are "gaining experience for good" by designing and developing OER for adult basic education both in OER Commons and Canvas Commons.



Friday November 4, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B11

2:40pm

The Open Textbook Network: the value of working together to advance open textbooks
During our four years of experience with open textbooks at the University of Minnesota, we discovered several reasons why faculty don't adopt open textbooks. While the barriers might appear to be small, they are significant enough to stop faculty members from making the change. These barriers include:

- Faculty don't fully understand how financial stress impacts students academically.

- Faculty aren't aware that open textbooks are an option.

- Faculty don't know what open textbooks are or confuse them with electronic textbooks.

- Faculty don't know where to find open textbooks.

- Faculty are skeptical of the quality of open textbooks.



With the support of the Hewlett Foundation and the University of Minnesota Libraries, we were able to develop and deploy solutions and strategies to help faculty overcome these barriers. The Open Textbook Library, now hosting upwards of 215 complete open textbook titles, has built these titles' credibility and increased faculty exposure to open textbooks by incentivizing textbook reviews by faculty from institutions across the country.



At the invitation of our partner libraries, we've visited dozens of schools to seed and support their open education programs. As a result, our partner institutions' data shows that nearly 40% of their faculty attendees adopt an open textbook. This small pilot group of faculty has saved students nearly $410,000 in textbook costs in less than three years. It took outreach, education, conversations, and strategies to engage faculty with the textbooks. And it works.



While workshops have shown to be successful, workshops alone are not enough. What can our growing community of faculty and libraries who visit the Open Textbook Library do to further open textbooks on their campuses? Enter the Open Textbook Network.



The Open Textbook Network (OTN) is a consortium of institutions workingξto:

- help facultyξovercome barriers to adoption of open textbooks

- increase institutional capacityξto support faculty adoption and use of open textbooks

- collaborativelyξdevelop new understandingsξand best practices of open textbook adoption and use.



With close to 40 members representing 150 campuses across the country, the OTN is pooling the experience and expertise of our members to address the most pressing needs in open textbook adoptions. This presentation will introduce attendees to the Open Textbook Network and offer the chance for representatives from our member schools in attendance at OpenEd16 to share stories from their institutions of how Open Textbook Network programming supported their program development and their results. The panel will also discuss the benefit a network-approach to open education has made on their campuses. Join us to hear these perspectives on the value of working together to increase awareness and adoptions of open textbooks, demonstrate impact, and ultimately advance open education on individual campuses.




Speakers
avatar for Sarah Cohen

Sarah Cohen

Managing Director, Open Textbook Network


Friday November 4, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B18

2:40pm

Moving Towards An Open Credit Diploma Program
The Connecticut Adult Virtual High School program serves adults seeking a high school credit diploma via a blended/online curriculum. As budgets shrink and student needs increase, the only way to address this community's specific needs through customized and expanded offerings is through Open. This session will review the path taken in assessing the community needs, OER opportunities, the adaptations made, and the results so far.

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Corcoran

Kevin Corcoran

Executive Director, Connecticut Distance Learning Consortium
Creating the Northeast OER Consortium


Friday November 4, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B13

2:40pm

Extending Open Textbook Usefulness Through Reformatting and Multimedia
The high cost of commercial textbooks has become increasingly newsworthy as a significant obstacle for students, even in wealthy countries. This is even more the case in economically developing countries, where the price tag even on international editions of commercial textbooks often leaves them hopelessly out of reach. As a result, one reason that OER textbooks are rightfully gaining ground, in wealthy and developing countries alike, is that they are freely accessible, as in costless to the user.

While the pool of OER textbooks is steadily growing, often they are only available in PDF or Word formats. Because many students in economically developing countries use a mobile phone as their primary Internet device, and have uncertain access to computers, those textbooks are not easy to view on the screens that are most readily available, which can hinder their adoption by those who need them the most. One way to solve this problem is to convert OER textbooks into mobile-friendly formats such as the EPUB format to make them more accessible and thus easier to adopt.

Moreover, commercial publishers often justify the high cost of their textbooks by including digital enhancements such as simulations and videos. By creating custom videos and creating playlists of readily accessible online resources that supplement OER textbooks, they can be more engaging for students and more appealing to instructors and institutions.

This presentation discusses these two categories of textbook extension, primarily in the context of economically developing countries. Our institution has built curricula around OER textbooks, and has an interest both in extending their usefulness for our own students as well as in releasing those extensions under as permissive a license as possible to give back to the community.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Foerster

Steve Foerster

President, New World University
I'm a writer, technologist, and educator. Currently I am President of New World University in Roseau, Dominica, reaching students worldwide through distance learning and partner organisations. I have a longstanding interest in OERs which stemmed from my interest in open source software.


Friday November 4, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B17

2:40pm

Open Pedagogies: Levels of Learning, Support, and Community
During the Spring 2016 Semester, three instructors at UMW collaborated on an open pedagogy experiment, all teaching a section of "DGST 101: Introduction to Digital Studies." With over 100 students over four sections, we wanted students in each of our sections to benefit from participating in that larger peer community and share their experiences and work with an authentic and supportive audience. To accomplish this, our students blogged on websites created through the Domain of One's Own Project, used resources and assignment modules on a central website (DGST101.net), and shared their work through discussions in the messaging and productive app, Slack. The faculty also used the Canvas LMS for logistics and communication specific to each of our sections. We also incorporated the web tool Hypothes.is to allow students to annotate spaces online, and to promote discussions around data and online presence. Each of these tools and platforms provided opportunities for students to share and interact with each other and the instructors in different ways with varying levels of openness and privacy that students were given agency to engage with at their discretion. The purpose of our presentation is to explore how these different technologies promoted openness and at the same time supported student's agency to decide how open they choose to be, while protecting their privacy and promoting safe spaces to experiment. Finally, this presentation will discuss the underlying pedagogical philosophies that informed our decisions and what we learned from the experience.


Speakers
avatar for Lee Skallerup Bessette

Lee Skallerup Bessette

Instructional Technology Specialist, University of Mary Washington


Friday November 4, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B16

2:40pm

A Bottom-Up, Data-Driven Approach to Encouraging OER Adoption
The Lee Library at Brigham Young University initiated separate surveys of faculty and upper division undergraduate students to gauge attitudes toward open textbooks as well as to ascertain the impact of textbook cost on students' decisions to register for courses and purchase required or recommended textbooks. The study highlighted some intriguing perceptions and feelings about student textbook costs and faculty perceptions of the same.



Students report that they would use the savings that open textbooks afford them to meet personal financial needs including housing, healthy eating choices, and savings. The students report postponing, avoiding, or dropping certain courses because of textbook prices. Perhaps most significantly, registering for or completing fewer courses because of textbook costs causes students to delay graduation and can add to the overall expense of an education. The aggregated influence of approximately one-fifth of all students taking fewer courses because of textbook costs can be significant. The fact that over one third of the students actually select specific sections of a course because of textbook costs is interesting because it implies that textbook cost is a larger barrier than is often discussed or acknowledged.



Although most faculty respondents indicated that they know the price of textbooks they assigned, more than two thirds were not aware of OER alternatives. When presented with a description of open textbooks, more than half indicated that they would appreciate help learning more and 91% said they would be willing to use a suitable, open alternative. Faculty motivation for adopting OER included a desire to help alleviate costs to students but also to encourage students to have access to updated content. Although the barriers of adopting OER are high, faculty who are aware may be willing to invest themselves in adopting OER with the proper institutional training and support.



In the absence of an administrative directive or institutional policy to consider the affordability of course materials, the library formed a partnership with university's Student Advisory Council, the Center for Teaching & Learning, the Copyright Licensing Office, the BYU Store, and the the Student Center for Financial Management and Planning to raise awareness and to help find solutions that support faculty efforts to adopt or create open textbooks. Utilizing the results of the two surveys, a variety of strategies were implemented included determining the textbook affordability landscape on campus and highlighting best practices involving existing or new adoptions of open textbooks; instituting a donor-funded pilot project to assist with converting materials in existing courses from commercial to open textbooks; educational campaigns focused on informing students of the financial benefits of using OER; training and using subject librarians, who already have established relationships of trust with faculty around campus, on resources that support the creation and use of disciplinary-based OER; and engaging and training students-especially student leaders-to become more informed and articulate consumers of the resources that support their classroom learning experiences.


Speakers
JP

Jennifer Paustenbaugh

University Librarian, Brigham Young University


Friday November 4, 2016 2:40pm - 3:05pm
B12

3:15pm

Opening Content for Developing Countries (www.oc4d.org)
Come discuss successes, strategies, and challenges for opening content in developing countries. We hope this session will provoke hearty dialogue and opportunities for collaboration.



Open Content for Development (www.OC4D.org) fills a specific niche for OER access by facilitators of lower- literate learners in low-tech areas with a paucity of critical content tools related to community development and self reliance (e.g. health, human rights, environmental stewardship, income generation and community action).



OC4D was created in 2006 with support from Utah State University's Instructional Psychology & Technology (IPT) Department and the Center for Open and Sustainable Learning (COSL). OC4D gained encouragement from the Hewlett Foundation together with Dr. David Wiley (founder of the concept of "open content") for specific launch in Nepal (2007) to find ways to improve access to critical content in remote Himalayan community centers.



During the past 10 years, technology has leapfrogged and mobile devices have proliferated. The scaffolding of OC4D is transforming to improve mobile responsiveness and user-friendliness for peoples across the globe. Our reach is now expanding in Africa and the Middle East as well as for Islamic communities and Arabic-speaking users.



OC4D hosts literacy materials in disparate languages (French, English, Spanish, Portugese, Kiswahili, Xhosa, Tagalog, Nepali, Hindi, Haitian Creole, Guyanan Gulu and more). We have just agreed with Interweave Solutions to host their self reliance modules and manuals for open access in 60 countries around the world. We anticipate that the new OC4D will increase opportunity for even more users with expanded access to content and improved capacity to house more iterations of localized tools to grow the repository. But, are we ready for the growth? What questions must be considered?


Friday November 4, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B17

3:15pm

Pathways: Facilitating an Online OER Training Course for Faculty
The Z-degree at Tidewater Community College was the nation's first zero textbook associate's degree. Additional Z-degrees and courses have since been developed and continue to expand to community colleges across Virginia. Faculty who would like to teach a Z-degree course at TCC are required to complete a 6-week online training course called Pathways. Pathways was developed by a member of the TCC business faculty, and introduces faculty to core concepts in open access and the use of open educational resources. One of the ways that TCC librarians support OER efforts at our institution is by facilitating these online Pathways courses.

Attendees at this session will learn about Pathways content and structure, and the challenges and successes of librarian-led faculty OER training. Presenters will discuss the development of library involvement with Pathways, and will highlight their experiences working with teaching faculty and other academic partners to support OER adoption.


Speakers
avatar for Olivia Reinauer

Olivia Reinauer

Reference Librarian, Tidewater Community College
Olivia Reinauer is a Reference Librarian at Tidewater Community College. Her professional interests include OER, library instruction, instructional design, outreach, assessment, and user experience.


Friday November 4, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B12

3:15pm

In the MOOD: Building the Creative Commons Certification
Deeply woven into successful open education and pedagogy is an understanding and practice of what Lumen Learning defines as the 5R Permissions - Retaining, Reusing, Revising, Remixing and Redistributing content and ideas. As one of the most visible ways to communicate these permissions, Creative Commons makes the 5Rs clear in the licensing of over a billion pieces of content.



But *understanding* Creative Commons-- as a content producer, as a content user, or as organizations supporting open practices-- is more than reciting a list of licenses. Therefore a new project has been underway to develop a Creative Commons Certification to provide organizations and individuals with a range of ways to demonstrate their knowledge and use of Creative Commons to place even more information into public spaces. It's value is in the focus on a certification of performed skills and principles, not just an examination of factual knowledge.



Openly sharing materials is a common value for the the Open Education community, and in this project we are pushing openness farther by sharing the process of design and develop of the Certification. We absolutely implore that this *not* to become a repeated acronym, but we share in this presentation how the project is an experiment in Massive Open OER Development.



This work is being done openly with opportunities for public input at every step, it's being built on an ecosystem of open licensed educational resources already developed, and is designed in a way for institutions in many sectors, not just education, to remix to best serve their needs. We will be sharing as many things that go wrong as well as what works.



At the core a Creative Commons Master Certificate defines the general body of knowledge and skills needed to master the use of Creative Commons. Being certified will show a broad and deep understanding of all things Creative Commons and demonstrated by practices and work openly visible in the world.



Our work is using and influenced by the software development process of GitHub, where what we are building is (a) visible as we build it; (b) open to participation by anyone interested; (c ) created in a manner here it ultimately can be remixed for different organizations, cultures, and locations.



In fact the certificates are being built as "forks" of the Master Certificate, for specific sectors of individuals and organizations that have expressed interest of adding components that are more specific to their work.. The first ones being developed address the needs for showing understanding and application of Creative Commons in Higher Education, Government, and Libraries.



This presentation will provide more than a summary of the collaborative development and work team structure in the first third of the project (to be completed in September 2017); we are going to have the audience get right into the MOOD with us and contribute to the project.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Stacey

Paul Stacey

Associate Director of Global Learning, Creative Commons
I live just outside Vancouver Canada and work on Creative Common's global open education and open business models initiatives. I like ping pong, cycling, art, food, and drink - count me in on parties.


Friday November 4, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B13

3:15pm

OER scholarship in review: The thematic past and possible future of OER research
"Open" has received increased attention and investment from educators over the past decade. One such investment has led to the proliferation of open educational resources (OER). Generally, open educational resources are considered to be, "teaching and learning materials that provide users with (1) free and unfettered access and (2) 5R legal permissions to retain, reuse, revise, remix, and redistribute them, that can be used to replace traditional expensive learning resources (such as textbooks)" (http://openedgroup.org/review).

As the field of open education has emerged, the number of available resources has grown exponentially to include a wide variety of instructional materials such as free alternatives to traditional textbooks like those published by OpenStax (http://www.openstaxcollege.org), historical publications and artifacts made available in the public domain, open source multimedia and information sources (such as TED Talks or Khan Academy), and open access academic journal articles. Creative Commons, the prominent open licensing organization, found that application of their open licenses grew from 800 million materials in 2014 to over one billion by the end of 2015 (Creative Commons, 2015). The future of educational resources online is increasingly open.

Given the rising costs associated with post-secondary education, it is unsurprising that OER have seen such rapid growth and development. Colleges and universities that move toward OER will likely assure student access to materials from the first day of class as well as a significant cost savings. As is often the case with any new movement, much of the evidence that currently exists about such OER benefits is anecdotal. Empirical evaluation is needed to determine if and how these resources compare to their monetized counterparts and to validate long-term strategies for lowering costs while improving learning outcomes for students.

One of the best ways to comprehensively legitimize OER is by reviewing and contributing peer-reviewed research about these resources. Given the novelty of the subject matter, the pool of peer-reviewed and published research is a small one. By examining the types of studies that have taken place and the research questions that have been answered thus far, however, certain themes and possibilities may construct a publication-rich path forward for those of us investigating OER. This presentation details the results of a study in which we evaluated the current state of peer-reviewed, OER-focused research by way of the following considerations:

1. What peer-reviewed literature exists about OER?
2. How might we best classify these publications?
3. What are the trends have emerged in OER scholarship over time?
4. How might we describe the current state of OER literature?
5. What future implications and opportunities exist for OER researchers? ξ

By highlighting what the field already knows and publishes about OER, this presentation employs data-driven speculation about the types of OER research studies that will most benefit the future of "open."

Speakers
avatar for Alesha Baker

Alesha Baker

Oklahoma State University
DC

Deanna Cozart

Coordinator of Open Educational Resources, The University of Georgia
avatar for Jonathan Lashley

Jonathan Lashley

Director of Texts and Technologies, Clemson University


Friday November 4, 2016 3:15pm - 3:40pm
B14

3:15pm

Participant Experiences in a Service-MOOC to Design OER for Adult Basic Education
In the U.S., over 30 million adults do not have high school credentials, but less than 2 million are currently supported within federally funded adult basic education (ABE) programs. To put this figure into perspective, nearly 50 million children were enrolled in U.S. public elementary and secondary schools in 2014. If all adults in the U.S. who had not reached high school equivalency entered the public school system, enrollment would increase by 60%.



The massive gap between needed and available adult basic education resources fueled a recent project to design and develop open educational resources (OER) for ABE instructors and learners as part of a service-learning experience. During a 12-week course on Canvas Network, a massive open online course (MOOC) platform, over 1,300 participants enrolled in a project-based instructional design course to develop OER for adult educators and learners on OER Commons.



In this panel discussion, several designers, ABE subject matter exerts, course facilitators, and participants will share their experiences from this service-learning project. Through prompted discussion, the panelists will contemplate how well this open service-MOOC model supported both professional development via open education, as well as OER development and use for an adult basic education audience. MOOC design and facilitation issues (including costs, learner feedback / guidance, and assessment) and OER design and development topics (such as authoring and quality / evaluation) will be considered.



A unique aspect of this service-MOOC was the design and facilitation of the course by an all volunteer team of professional instructional designers and adult basic educators. Starting in the fall of 2015, volunteer designers and subject matter experts in ABE spent 13 weeks designing and developing the course. Another team volunteered for 12 weeks as the course facilitators. In total, these professional educators and instructional designers volunteered over 1,000 hours to design and facilitate this service-learning experience. A conservative estimate of the professional services donated by the volunteers who designed and facilitated this course exceeds $50,000.



The service-MOOC participants began the OER design process by dissecting the adult basic education design scenario to explore key aspects of the opportunity. What are the needs, goals, and constraints? Who are the target learners? What is the instructional context? Participants then developed OER to support adult learners who have not completed high school and are taking adult basic education courses as they prepare for high school equivalency exams (i.e. the GED, HiSET, or TASC tests) or other certifications. The instruction aligned with the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS) that underlie high school equivalency exams and other ABE programs in english language arts / literacy and math subjects.



The OER was designed and developed using Open Author, an online authoring tool on OER Commons. The instructional materials each MOOC participant developed incorporated all necessary content presentation, learner practice, and assessment materials for 15-30 minutes of instruction, as well as guidance for instructors regarding use of these materials. Upon successful completion of this project-based course, participants earned an Instructional Design Service Badge and Certificate of Recognition.

Speakers
MB

Mindy Boland

Manager, OER Products & Services, ISKME
Creating and sharing OER, digital libraries, and how to spread the word, create advocacy, and empower teachers to create and share resources.
AD

Amanda Duffy

Senior Researcher, American Institutes for Research
avatar for Jennifer Maddrell

Jennifer Maddrell

Designers for Learning
I founded Designers for Learning as a nonprofit to offer service-learning experiences for instructional design professional development. Ask me about our #OpenABE service-MOOC on Canvas Network. Participants in the service-MOOC are "gaining experience for good" by designing and developing OER for adult basic education both in OER Commons and Canvas Commons.
HM

Hilary Melander

Instructure, Instructure
I am passionate about life, learning, challenging myself, and striving for excellence.



Friday November 4, 2016 3:15pm - 4:05pm
B11

3:15pm

Achieving the Dream's OER Degrees College Panel

Last June, Achieving the Dream (ATD) announced the largest initiative of its kind to develop degree programs using high quality open educational resources (OER) at 38 community colleges in 13 states.  The program is designed to help remove financial roadblocks that can derail students’ progress and to spur other changes in teaching and learning and course design that will increase the likelihood of degree and certificate completion.  

Grantee colleges have been busy this summer and fall developing OER courses and planning the delivery of their OER Degree programs with cross-functional teams of stakeholders including faculty, librarians, administrators, and other staff.   Grant partners Lumen Learning, the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources (CCCOER), and SRI International are providing technical assistance, community of practice, and research support to grantees

Come and hear from a panel of four college leaders on their early successes, lesson learned, and challenges ahead in rolling out OER Degree programs to students over the next few years. Topics include fostering faculty and administrator engagement, effective professional development, creating awareness among students, measuring outcomes, and creating sustainable policies.

Panelists:

  • Clea Andreadis, Vice-Provost, Bunker Hill College, MA

  • Mark Johnson, Department Chair, English and Modern Languages, San Jacinto College, TX

  • Cynthia Lofaso, Psychology Professor, Central Virginia Community College, VA

  • Carlos Lopez, Vice-President of Academic Affairs, Santa Ana College, CA


Speakers
UD

Una Daly

Open Education Consortium
RS

Richard Sebastian

Director, OER Degree Initiative, Achieving the Dream, Inc.
avatar for David Wiley

David Wiley

I've spent the last 18 years creating, clarifying, elaborating, and evangelizing the core ideas of open education to individuals, faculty, institutions, and governments. I've also worked to place a solid foundation of empirical research beneath these core ideas. Now, with my colleagues at Lumen Learning we're trying to change open education from a niche curiosity to a mainstream, unstoppable force for improving the quality and lowering the cost of education., Lumen Learning
https://static.sched.org/a6/731344/avatar.jpg.320x320px.jpg?7cd


Friday November 4, 2016 3:15pm - 4:05pm
B18

3:15pm

Opening the Dissertation: Exploring the Public Thesis Spectrum
In North American higher education, the doctoral thesis process has long been acknowledged as isolating and private: a vaguely defined series of milestones witnessed and assessed by a small number of faculty (Katz, 1997). Although the close nature of the process can be mutually rewarding for students and faculty mentors, it has also been known to mask highly idiosyncratic pedagogical demands and abuses of power. Even within the same programs at the same institutions, Ph.D. candidates may have very different experiences in terms of their research, writing, and defense processes. Furthermore, the conventional closed door format can make it difficult to assess or alleviate inequalities or to establish terms on which changes might be understood as productive or desirable.



However, the last decade has brought challenges to the closed nature of North American higher education. "Open" practices, in terms of information sharing, transparency, open educational resources, and open scholarship have begun to permeate multiple disciplines and levels of the academic hierarchy. Benefits of open educational practices, including sharing iterative work and building connections and audiences via networked public platforms such as blogs and Twitter, have been articulated and found to be particularly strong among graduate students and early career researchers (Stewart, 2015).



These changes have begun to impact the Ph.D thesis process, if only in an unevenly distributed fashion. For example, in 2014 HASTAC hosted a "Remix the Diss" seminar in which five recently graduated or soon-to-be graduated doctoral students and their advisors led a full room in questioning the conventional models of doctoral research and defense as the "gold standards" of scholarship (Davidson, 2014). While participants used novel formats or media to represent their work, many of these formats had an underlying public or open quality and would not have been feasible in private forums of traditional academe.



This panel presentation illustrates some ways in which the doctoral thesis/dissertation process can be opened so that the research, writing, and defense components might be shared and experienced with a multitude of peer, faculty, and other community voices. The panelists will draw on their own experiences as recent graduate- and faculty-participants in open dissertation processes. They will describe it as a spectrum of expression and practice, pointing to "granular options" along the way and how those points impact the risks, benefits, and experience of the process. Then they will answer questions related to why a student or faculty member might or might not want to engage in an open doctoral experience. Finally, the panelists will reflect on how experiences such as theirs might impact the future of the PhD and the academic community as a whole scholarship.



References:

Davidson, C. (2014, August 24). What is a dissertation? New models, methods, media.

Retrieved from:

https://www.hastac.org/blogs/cathy-davidson/2014/08/28/what-dissertation-new-model-methods-media

Katz, E. (1997). Key players in the dissertation process. New Directions for Higher Education,

99, p. 5-16.

Stewart, B. (2015). Open to influence: What counts as academic influence in scholarly

networked Twitter participation. Learning, Media, and Technology, special issue: Critical

Approaches to Open Education, 40(3), 1-23.

Speakers
avatar for Bonnie Stewart

Bonnie Stewart

University of Prince Edward Island
Bonnie Stewart is a writer, educator, and researcher fascinated by who we are when we're online. She explores the intersections of knowledge and technologies in her work, taking up networks, institutions and identity in contemporary higher education. Published in Salon.com, The Guardian UK, and Inside Higher Ed, as well as peer-reviewed academic venues, Bonnie has advised educational projects and programs in Sweden, the UK, the US, and Canada... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:15pm - 4:05pm
B16

3:40pm

Virtually Connecting Fishbowl
Virtually Connecting is a guerrilla movement led by volunteers who seek to enliven virtual participation in academic conferences.

We received survey feedback that Virtually Connecting is an open practice that is valued for creating space for connection and conversation at conferences while expanding access to the more valuable aspects of conferences to those who cannot attend (e.g. adjuncts, graduate students, international scholars and parents of young children). We also received feedback that one of the key barriers to participating in this otherwise largely inclusive practice is that many people do not know what it is or cannot imagine it before participating in it. Therefore we propose a session in which participants can observe a Virtually Connecting session in progress while Virtually Connecting team members talk them through the process and reflect as a group afterwards on the potential of this open practice and possible ways of enhancing the experience and expanding it. 

The session format borrows from the "Fish Bowl" teaching strategy, such that participants will be observe a live Virtually Connecting session. The "inner circle" of the fishbowl will consist of those participating in the live streamed Virtually Connecting session from onsite, and those participating in the Virtually Connecting session through the Google Hangout. The session audience and those choosing to view the live stream on YouTube will make up the outer circle of the fish bowl. This allows those who may not be comfortable with actively participating in a session to see how the sessions work, and glean a deeper understanding about how one might be able to participate in this type of hybrid conference experience. Throughout this, there will be a meta conversation on the process and opportunities to discuss the experience afterwards, focusing on how it relates to open pedagogical practice and how it can be enhanced.

The topic of the virtually connecting session will be drawn from the conference themes.

Speakers
avatar for Maha Bali

Maha Bali

Associate Professor of Practice, The American University in Cairo
I'm a MOOCaholic and writeaholic, passionate about open, connected learning. Co-founder of virtuallyconnecting.org (join us during #dlrn) and edcontexts.org) write for us!) and columnist/editor at Hybrid Pedagogy (you probably already know us)
avatar for Autumm Caines

Autumm Caines

Associate Director of Academic Technology, Capital University
Hi! I'm Autumm Caines @autumm on Twitter and yep those are 2 m's. I'm the Associate Director of Academic Technology at Capital University in Columbus Ohio. I blog at http://autumm.edtech.fm I like to help people in Ed Tech connect with one another through this thing called Virtually Connecting which is a sort of movement or an idea more so than a technology or an organization - you can find out more at http://virtuallyconnecting.org/
avatar for Rebecca Hogue

Rebecca Hogue

PhD Candidate, University of Ottawa
I’m Rebecca J Hogue (@rjhogue). I’m a blogger (http://rjh.goingeast.ca, http://bcbecky.com, and http://goingeast.ca), a scholar, an educator, and aspiring writer. I'm a PhD Candidate at the University of Ottawa and an Associate Lecturer at the University of Massachusetts-Boston. I teach Emerging Technologies and Instructional Design online. My research and innovation interests are in the development of health literacy through peer-to-peer... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B14

3:40pm

Lessons Learned from the African Scholarship Cohort
The Darden Graduate School of Business is a leader in providing massive open online courses (MOOCs) on the Coursera Platform. There are 2 specializations, almost a dozen courses, and over a million learners to date. In partnership with the Mbarara University of Science and Technology, we did a pilot providing a free specialization to accepted applicants to the African Scholarship Cohort. Over 100 learners started the specialization, all from sub-Saharan Africa. There were several goals: developing a stronger partnership with Mbarara, increasing learner enrollment in Africa, understanding persistence of African students in specializations, and trying to transform lives through open educational resources (OER). We've learned a lot in this program with 70 active students and it has been an amazing journey. This presentation will review some of our lessons learned, some transformative stories of learners, and a general overview of the program.

Speakers
avatar for Kristin  Palmer

Kristin Palmer

Director Online Learning Programs, University of Virginia
Take a wild guess - online learning. Getting faculty fired up. Improving the student experience at UVa. Having great conversations about increasing the quality of teaching and building high quality open educational resources. | I'm also a mom of 3 boys commuting to UVa from the SF Bay Area. Random items of interest - I traveled around the world at 18 instead of going to college (picture sailing down the Nile, climbing a mountain in Nepal... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B17

3:40pm

What Libraries are Doing Regarding OER and Affordable Course Content: A Summary of Findings from the ARL SPEC Kit
In July 2016 the Association of Research Libraries published a SPEC Kit Survey on Affordable Course Content and Open Educational Resources. The purpose of this survey was to determine the degree to which ARL member institutions are engaged in ACC/OER advocacy, support, and development. The survey is designed to gather information on ACC/OER initiatives at the institutional level and the role of the library in these initiatives. It examines initiatives' origins, implementation, governance, and funding, incentives for faculty participation, and the types of affordable/open course content that have been developed. It also explores library support of ACC/OER activities with staffing and services. The results of this survey can inform senior library decision-makers who are considering new or additional initiatives to support ACC/OER. Over 50 libraries from ARL institutions completed the survey. This session will present a summary of findings from the survey.


Speakers
avatar for Anita Walz

Anita Walz

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Virginia Tech
Anita Walz is the Open Education, Copyright & Scholarly Communications Librarian at the University Libraries, Virginia Tech. In this role, she leads library exploration and initiatives related to open education, OER, and online learning; she serves as a library liaison to the Legal studies, Economics, and Mathematics Departments at Virginia Tech and manages several active collaborations with the University’s learning technologies and... Read More →


Friday November 4, 2016 3:40pm - 4:05pm
B12